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Ford Ranger Automatic Transmission Identification

  

Model Trans Code Vehicle Speed Ratios
C3 V
1983-1984 2WD Ranger
1985-1988 Ranger Without Overdrive
3-Speed 2.47 / 1.47 / 1.00
C5 W
1983-1984 4WD Ranger
2WD & 4WD Bronco II
3-Speed 2.46 / 1.46 / 1.00
A4LD T 1985-1994 Ranger & Bronco II With Overdrive 4-Speed 2.47 / 1.47 / 1.00 / 0.75
4R44E T 1995-2000 4-Cylinder & 3.0L Rangers (2001 w/2.5L) (1995-1996 Explorer w/4.0L) 4-Speed 2.47 / 1.47 / 1.00 / 0.75
4R55E T 1995-2001 4.0L Rangers 4-Speed 2.47 / 1.47 / 1.00 / 0.75
4R70W U 1996-1997 5.0L Explorer 4-Speed 2.84 / 1.55 / 1.00 / 0.70
5R44E   2001-2009 w/2.3L & 3.0L 5-Speed  
5R55E D 1997 - 2009 4.0L Rangers (1997-2001 Explorer w/4.0L) 5-Speed 2.47 / 1.87 / 1.47 / 1.00 / 0.75
5R55W   2002 Explorer 5-Speed 3.22 / 2.41 / 1.55 / 1.00 / 0.75
5R55S   2003-2009 Explorer 5-Speed  

The transmission codes can be located on the safety compliance certification label on the drivers door post.

C-3 Automatic Transmission:

The C-3's were said to be offered in 1983 and 1984 in the Rangers and from 1974 - 1987 in other Ford Products.  In the Ranger they are identified with a 'V' transmission code and are not compatible with V-8's.  Here is an Exploded View of a C-3. This was a a hydraulically controlled rear wheel drive transmission.  The rear cooler line is the cooler return line.

Band Adjustment:

Intermediate = 1 turns

Reverse = Not Adjustable

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.47:1

2nd = 1.47:1

3rd = 1.00:1

Reverse = 2.1:1

Images:

C-4 Automatic Transmission:

The Ford C-4 was not a transmission offered in the Ford Rangers, but it has been swapped in by numerous enthusiasts with various engine combinations including 4.0's and V-8's. Advance Adapters offers a kit to install this in to a Ranger along with a V-8

The C-4 is a 3-speed hydraulically controlled rear wheel drive automatic transmission produced from 1964-1980.  Rear cooler line is the cooler return line. Exploded View of C-4.

Length:

17-Inches plus tailhousing.

Band Adjustment:

Intermediate = 1 turns (coarse thread)

Intermediate = 3 turns (fine thread)

Reverse = 2 turns

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.46:1

2nd = 1.46:1

3rd = 1.00:1

Reverse = 2.18:1

Images:

C-5 Automatic Transmission:

The C-5 replaced the C-4 and had a lock-up torque converter and was used in 1983 - 1984 Ford Rangers and other Fords from 1981 - 1986. In the Ranger they can be identified by transmission code 'W'. The C-5's can be identified by the hump in the oil pan. 

C-5's from a 4WD Ranger are very desirable. The output shaft and tail housing can be swapped in to a C-4 for a V-8 conversion.  This would same several hundred dollars buying conversion parts to install a V-8 and C-4 in a Ranger. 

This transmission is almost identical to the C-4 except only for a few minor differences. The major difference between a C-4 & C-5 is in the hydraulic system. The valve body on the C-5 has several new valves and an added timing body where the filter would normally be found on the C-4. The converter relief valve has been moved from the pump to assembly reactor support to the timing valve body, thereby causing the oil pump assemblies not to be interchangeable. The 12-inch torque converter on the C-5 is a centrifugal controlled lock-up converter negating the use of electrical or hydraulic lock-up components.  The lock-up mechanism is designed to engage at various predetermined speeds of the converter resulting in improved driveline efficiency and fuel economy.  This type of converter is no longer available, the replacements are a called TT converters (non lock-up). The valve body from a C-4 can be directly bolted into a C-5 without modification. The torque converter from a C-4 will fit a C-5 so long as the spline count and shaft diameters are the same. C-5's can be built just as strong as their C-4 counterparts, because they both use the same internal parts (gear train, clutches, bands, servos, etc.).

Exploded View of C-5 Transmission. The C-5 has a 2.46 first gear and no overdrive.

 

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View Of Hump In C-5 Transmission Pan - Do not confuse with an A4LD

 AOD - Automatic Transmission:

The AOD was not a Ranger transmission, but is an optional swap.  Advance Adapters offers a conversion kit to install this in to a 4WD Ranger along with a V-8.  The AOD is a 4-speed hydraulically controlled rear wheel drive overdrive transmission introduced in 1980 and was used until 1993.  Exploded View of AOD. Even though Ford's designation for this transmission was AOD, some people (and catalogs) referred to it as FIOD (Ford Integrated Over Drive) or AOT (Automatic Overdrive Transmission). This transmission was replaced by the AODE and shares a few common components.  1992 & 1993 were crossover years and could have either an AOD, AODE or 4R70W. 

Length:

20.50-Inches plus tailhousing.

Cooler Lines:

The bottom cooler line is the cooler return line.

Band Adjustments:

Overdrive = Not Adjustable

Reverse = Not Adjustable

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.40:1

2nd = 1.47:1

3rd = 1.00:1

4th = 0.67:1

Reverse = 2.00:1

Images:

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A4LD - Automatic Transmission:

The A4LD four speed overdrive transmission was introduced in the 1985 Ford Ranger and saw use behind many 4 and 6 cylinder engines until the 1995 model year when it was replaced by the 4R44E and 4R55E electronic transmissions. The A4LD is identified by transmission code 'T'.

The A4LD was the first Ford transmission to use an EEC-controlled torque converter lock-up clutch and later became the first to use electronic shift control (via a 3-4 shift solenoid). The French-built A4LD was created by adding overdrive to the front of the C-3 three-speed unit. The A4ld has a 2.47 first gear and a 0.75 overdrive.

For 1995, the 4R44E (4 cylinder - light-duty) and 4R55E (6 cylinder - heavy-duty; IE: Explorer) electronically controlled transmission replaced the A4LD. It is mechanically identical to the A4LD.

These four and five-speed transmissions are used in four cylinder and V-6 applications (primarily the Ranger and Explorer).  The A4LD was derived from the C-3 three-speed automatic transmission by placing a two-speed overdrive unit in front of the original three-speed workings. As the names imply, the "E" transmissions are electronically controlled (similar to the AOD-E/4R70W transmissions), while the 5R55E is a five speed version currently used only with the SOHC 4.0L engine. The 4R44E is a light duty version of the electronic unit, similar to the old non-4.0L A4LD transmission.

The A4LD is identified by a "T" transmission code.  The overall length of this transmission is 28.687-inches.  There are no adapters available to swap this transmission to a V-8 at this time.  

Known Problems:

Premature wear or a repeat failure of the converter hub, bellhousing bushing, converter seal and/or pump assembly may be caused by a broken or worn crank shaft pilot sleeve. Located between the flywheel and the crank-shaft, the pilot on the front of the converter is centered on the hole in the sleeve.

To avoid these come backs remove the flywheel and visually inspect the spacer on every 2.8, 2.9, and 4.0 engine that may be suspected of having this problem.

If the original bellhousing bushing is not worn, reuse it.  Converter hub to bellhousing bushing clearance should be .002"-.003" Converter depth from the front of the pad to front of the bellhousing should be 1 5/8" to 1 3/4".

If you have repeated front seal blowouts on A4LD's it may not be a problem with the seal or the quality of your work. Your could have a bad bellhousing. The bushing used in the A4LD is finished in place. Because of this the bore that the bushing fits into doesn't need to be in the center of the bellhousing, and in many cases it isn't. When you're working on an A4LD you need to check the bellhousing bushing to see if it's the original factory bushing. If it is, and it's not worn (no more than .003") converter hub to bushing clearance), Don't Replace It! If the bushing needs to be replaced, you need to make sure the replacement bushing will fit in the center of the bellhousing. To do this bolt the torque converter to the flex plate. Turn the engine over and check the runout of the converter hub. Now bolt the bellhousing to the engine. If the Torque converter is contacting one side of the bushing excessively, the bushing is off center and the bellhousing MUST be replaced. However, a slight amount of contact is acceptable. By checking the bellhousing first you can avoid repeated front seal blowout.

Solenoids:

The best that can be told from the ATSG manual, the changeover date for single to dual solenoid versions occurred in mid 1988. The single solenoid originally on the 1985-1987 transmission only controls the torque converter lockup function. Later models had the 3-4 shift inhibit solenoid added in 1988.

Length:

28.687-Inches

Cooler Lines:

The top cooler line is the cooler return line.

Band Adjustments:

O/D = 1 turns

Intermediate = 1 turns

Reverse = Not Adjustable

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.47:1

2nd = 1.47:1

3rd = 1.00:1

4th = 0.75:1

Reverse = 2.1:1

Images:

(Turbo Coupe A4LD Photos Shown)

(NOTE: Ranger A4LD's have a hump in the pan (Not Shown).  Do not confuse it with a C-5)

 

Even More A4LD Information - Gloria Roosen

The A4LD 4-speed, overdrive transmission has been used in the Ranger/Bronco II/Explorer platform since 1986. As most of the early overdrive auto transmissions, the A4LD was not real reliable in the early years. The first major change came with the introduction of the 4.0 in 1990. While still an A4LD, the 4.0 version was significantly stronger than the non 4.0 versions. It also had a computer controlled torque converter lock-up. In 93.5 another major upgrade of this transmission occurred. In addition to the computer controlled lock-up, the transmission also got a computer controlled overdrive engagement. Internally, most of the thrust washers were replaced with torrington bearings, which made the transmission much stronger.

While the A4LD has gotten a bad rap, it is actually a good strong transmission. The newest version is still an A4LD, it just goes by another name due to the fact that it is completely computer controlled, and has a 5th gear.

There are modifications and upgrades available to this transmission. Better grade clutches and bands, better converters with improved lock-up clutches and brazed fins (stock converters were known for clutch failures, which takes out the entire trans), welded planetary cages, shift kits, and the ability to upgrade a non 4.0 transmission to 4.0 specs makes this transmission very versatile. At its strongest (off-road race application), these transmissions are holding up to V6's making in excess of 300hp. Once the engines get much higher than that (depends on usage) the main shafts will start bending.

One of the most interesting upgrades available for this transmission is the off-road race package. This includes numerous valve body and internal modifications. These modifications can be made by Doug Hamby of Dougs Transmissions only, due to the fact that they were developed between him and FMC. What this modification does for you, is give you an automatic with all of the advantages of a manual....... and none of the downfalls. Run in drive, you can split the 3 gears with overdrive, and you can lock-up the converter in any of the gears. This gives a much greater availability of ratios, and makes it real easy to keep the engine in its power curve. Also, because you can lock-up the converter whenever you wish, it also helps to keep the transmission cool. This mod also allows the transmission to be used completely manually.

When having an A4LD rebuilt, there are a couple of things that you need to make sure of. First and foremost, do not let a shop do a soft parts fix only (clutches, servos, and bands). This will almost ensure that you will have another repair needed right after the 1-year warranty is out. Other things you want to have replaced are: forward one-way clutch (always), overdrive drum (stamped tin, replace if out of round or heat damaged), pump (Ford only, rebuilds are prone to failure), and the converter (get the better converter with the improved lock-up clutch and brazed fins). Also, get references from the shop and call the people. Just because they can rebuild TH350's and C4's does not mean they know what they are doing with overdrive transmissions.

One of the best things you can do for your auto transmission is get the largest, aftermarket, stacked plate cooler you can fit behind your grille. The factory cooler is marginal at best, due to its being tied in with your radiator. Remember, with that set-up, if you overheat your engine, you will overheat your transmission. Heat is the biggest enemy of the automatic transmission. Change your fluid and filter every year, or every 12-15,000 miles if used hard. Use ONLY the fluid recommended by Ford. Only use synthetic fluid if it is required by Ford. With proper maintenance, these transmissions should last well over 100,000 miles.  - Gloria Roozen

4R44E/4R55E - Automatic Transmission:

The 4R44E and 4R55E were used in the 1995 - 1997 Ford Rangers.  The 4R44E were used in the 2.3L and 3.0L Rangers and the 4R55E was used in the 4.0L Ranger. This was a computer controlled rear wheel drive transmission.

The 4R44E was an updated version of the A4LD with full electronic control, introducing duty-controlled TCC lockup. 

Known Problems:

Common Fix For 4R55E / 5R55E Transmissions With A Bad Separator Plate And Valve Body Gasket can be found HERE.

Band Adjustment:

O/D = 1 turns

Intermediate = 1 turns

Reverse = Not Adjustable

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.47:1

2nd = 1.47:1

3rd = 1.00:1

4th = 0.75:1

Reverse = 2.1:1

Images:

    

5R44E/5R55E - Automatic Transmission:

The 5R55E is a computer controlled rear wheel drive automatic transmission used in 1997 and newer Ford Rangers and is identified by transmission code 'D'. This is a computer controlled rear wheel drive overdrive transmission.

The 5R55E, though mechanically identical to the 4-speed 4R55E, was a five-speed transmission, the first produced by an American maker. The ability to produce five forward gears is by improved software control. The 5R55E introduced adaptive shift control and sophisticated friction to friction shift ability. The 5R55E introduced Directional high energy frictions and eliminated all but one thrust washer with high-capacity thrust bearings. It was the first 5-speed electronically controlled transmission in an American vehicle. It was designed for the high-torque 4.0 L SOHC and 4.0 L OHV Cologne SOHC V6.

Gear Ratios:

1st = 2.47:1

2nd = 1.87:1

3rd = 1.47:1

4th = 1.00:1

5th = 0.75:1

Reverse = ?.??:1

Images:

4R70W - Automatic Transmission:

The 4R70W automatic transmission is identified by transmission code 'U' and was used in 1996 - 1997 5.0 powered Ford Explorers. This transmission replaced the AOD and shares a few common components. The 4R70W is basically a wide ratio version of the AODE.  They are NOT interchangeable.

Cooler Line:

Top cooler line is the cooler return line.

Band Adjustments:

Overdrive = Not Adjustable

Reverse = Not Adjustable

Gears Ratios:

1st = 2.84:1

2nd = 1.55:1

3rd = 1.00:1

4th = 0.70:1

Reverse = 2.32:1

Images:

5R55W - Automatic Transmission:

Used in 2002-up Explorer models.  This is a computer controlled overdrive (five speed) automatic transmission. This transmission is similar in appearance to the 5R55N, but very few parts are interchangeable with it.

Gear Ratios:

1st = 3.22:1

2nd = 2.41:1

3rd = 1.55:1

4th = 1.00:1

5th = 0 .75:1

Reverse = 3.07:1

Images:

 

 
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