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Taking camber out of Twin I-Beam after 2" lift (1987 Ranger RWD)


Samzwell

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Hey there, I need some advice on how to bring out the camber after adding 2" spacers on the front end of my '87 Ranger RWD. I did the lift after putting some Cooper Discoverer AT 235/75r15s on. I took it in for an alignment and the shop told me they can't bring the positive camber out because my ball joints are not adjustable (Shame, I replaced them a week ago). I've been researching heavily the last 3 days or so on how to fix this and can only find solutions for F150s and 4WD rangers that I believe have TTB suspension. I think an I-Beam pivot drop bracket is my best bet but I can only find them available for 4WD models and F150s + F250s. budget is thinning after replacing the ball joints, lift kit, and now new shocks all around to gain the 2" of travel back. What are your suggestions? Do you know of anyone selling drop brackets for 2WD models?
 


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ericbphoto

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You need caster/camber bushings with more adjustment than the original bushings. Even then, you may be on the edge of not being able to get it perfectly. Look for adjustable bushings that give up to 3 1/2 or 4 degrees of adjustment.

There are some good articles in the tech section on this site that explain the TIB suspension, steering, alignment and how it all works.

Drop brackets are the best way to lift the TIB/TTB suspension. But 2” isn’t too radical.
 

ericbphoto

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Here. Start with this article. It shows the 4x4 version. But they both work the same way.
 

franklin2

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Go to rockauto and plug in your truck. Go under suspension and then alignment caster/camber bushing. They have tons of them on there. I did a quick scan, the largest 2wd bushing I saw was a Moog 2 1/4 degree for a 2wd.
 

Samzwell

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Thanks for the help so far!

Aside form the Rockauto options, I found this:

https://www.moog-suspension-parts.com/moog-k80109
This one says it allows for plus or minus 4 degrees but also says it only fits '89-'97 models and does not specify RWD or 4WD. I've always seen compatibility being the same with '83-'96 or 83-89 models. Any ideas why this would be different? Contacted MOOG but I'm not going to hold my breath for a response before Monday evening. This truck is my daily driver and with a 40 mile commute I think I have about a week of driving before I will see noticeable uneven wear.

No headway on RWD drop brackets.
 
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Thanks for the help so far!

Aside form the Rockauto options, I found this:

https://www.moog-suspension-parts.com/moog-k80109
This one says it allows for plus or minus 4 degrees but also says it only fits '89-'97 models and does not specify RWD or 4WD. I've always seen compatibility being the same with '83-'96 or 83-89 models. Any ideas why this would be different? Contacted MOOG but I'm not going to hold my breath for a response before Monday evening. This truck is my daily driver and with a 40 mile commute I think I have about a week of driving before I will see noticeable uneven wear.
If is says 89+, it’s for the Dana35.
 

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These guys are correct. New camber bushing with more adjustment are probably required.
 

Samzwell

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New camber bushings are ordered, rated for 2 degrees. The options offering 2.25 or 2.5 degrees were $75-$120 for a pair so I opted to take the cheaper ($15 including shipping) 2 degree route seeing as neither would offer total relief anyway. This will help decrease the amount of camber until I figure out a complete solution. No luck finding drop brackets for an '87 RWD... thinking about trying to fabricate my own? Always open to more tips and suggestions until we've got this thing where she needs to be.
Thanks so much for all your input thus far.
 

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The front beams of the 83-88 2wd Rangers had very small upper lobes, and so the potential camber adjustment is extremely limited. The one 87 I used to build my current truck from was a 2wd that someone used spacers to lift up to 4x4 height. I was never able to bring the camber or caster into spec because of the limited adjustment.

Swapping in some 89+ beams will greatly increase your adjustment range.
 

franklin2

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New camber bushings are ordered, rated for 2 degrees. The options offering 2.25 or 2.5 degrees were $75-$120 for a pair so I opted to take the cheaper ($15 including shipping) 2 degree route seeing as neither would offer total relief anyway. This will help decrease the amount of camber until I figure out a complete solution. No luck finding drop brackets for an '87 RWD... thinking about trying to fabricate my own? Always open to more tips and suggestions until we've got this thing where she needs to be.
Thanks so much for all your input thus far.
I haven't crawled under there and studied the situation, I don't have a 2wd. But I have seen posts that if you want to convert from 2wd to 4x4 or the other way around, there is some sort of bracket that you need to bring along also. That tells me the 2wd beams and the 4x4 beams are different, and a drop bracket kit for a 4x4 probably won't work. Unlike the ttb f150's, where the 4x4 axles will bolt right in where the 2x4 axles resided.
 

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Thank you to all for contributing your advice! After a number of weeks (clearly) I finally have everything “straightened” out. The 2 degree camber bushings did the trick with just a hair of room to breathe for fine adjustments. All said and done I’ve learned my lesson, you can never do enough research.
Thanks again
 

Locotomb

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6inch custom fab lift/86
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Bagged 3 inch custom drop beams 88/89 Custom triangulated and step notched rear
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I built a 2wd last year, eventually lifted 5in. Initially, I did the spacer thing. 2-degree bushings did the trick. But even this mild lift will throw out your caster. It will feel like you're driving a shopping cart. To fix this I first fabbed some drop brackets for the radius arms (which worked) but eventually extended my radius arms 12" and relocated the stock brackets right in front of the tranny cross member. Coupled with fabbed 4-inch drop beam pivot brackets. This truck drove better than it did stock on 35's on the freeway! Have fun with it cause it was a blast building that truck.
 

Samzwell

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I built a 2wd last year, eventually lifted 5in. Initially, I did the spacer thing. 2-degree bushings did the trick. But even this mild lift will throw out your caster. It will feel like you're driving a shopping cart. To fix this I first fabbed some drop brackets for the radius arms (which worked) but eventually extended my radius arms 12" and relocated the stock brackets right in front of the tranny cross member. Coupled with fabbed 4-inch drop beam pivot brackets. This truck drove better than it did stock on 35's on the freeway! Have fun with it cause it was a blast building that truck.
I don’t suppose you would have any pictures of the drop bracket you fabbed?schematic? I had originally looked into some as a solution instead of Using the bushings but could only find 4x4 options at something like $140 a piece. That coupled with the frequents complaints of them breaking drove me away from that option. Thanks!
 

Locotomb

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2WD / 4WD
2WD
Total Lift
6inch custom fab lift/86
Total Drop
Bagged 3 inch custom drop beams 88/89 Custom triangulated and step notched rear
Tire Size
35/12.5/r18
My credo
Everything looks better lower
Later tonight I will 3D model some. You will be able to view them on 3dpaint on windows 10. Unless you have 3ds Max or similar. I used 1/4 inch plate for everything. I'll try to add templates for all your holes and cuts as well. It might be a couple of days. I'll be back when I'm done.
 

Samzwell

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Later tonight I will 3D model some. You will be able to view them on 3dpaint on windows 10. Unless you have 3ds Max or similar. I used 1/4 inch plate for everything. I'll try to add templates for all your holes and cuts as well. It might be a couple of days. I'll be back when I'm done.
You’re more than generous. Thank you, I appreciate your help! I was wondering why the handling felt off after the camber had been taken out. Looking forward to having this truck complete!
 


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