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Sudden Positive Camber after lifting.

Forlorn

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Recently I picked up an 85 ford bronco ii 2.8 manual with the 5-speed and have been working on getting it road worthy again.
Next problem after the horrendous engine timing from the previous owner or whoever is my positive camber change.
Literally just lifted it so I can get the tires off and check some stuff out, set it down, and suddenly it's got a very noticeable positive camber change, I'm not sure if something shifted or what, was just looking if anyone had any insights?
the bushings looks good to me and I'm not really familiar with the systems in this car yet so I figured Id ask.
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rusty ol ranger

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Its an I beam thing. Get in and turn the wheels back and fourth or back up or whatever they'll go back to normal.

Its just what they do coming off a jack.
 

ericbphoto

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Yeah. What Rusty said. Go drive it 40 or 50 feet. It will be back to normal.
 

19Walt93

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Or just push it forward and back a few feet in the garage. By the way, that's not a lot of positive camber, you should see a swing axle VW with the weight off the suspension.
 

Uncle Gump

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Or just push it forward and back a few feet in the garage. By the way, that's not a lot of positive camber, you should see a swing axle VW with the weight off the suspension.
Just like clockwork...

Never miss an opportunity to talk bad about my beloved air cooled VW...
 

rusty ol ranger

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Just like clockwork...

Never miss an opportunity to talk bad about my beloved air cooled VW...
Just curious cause ive only ridden in one air cooled VW ever and i was drunk as piss...

Do they have a temp gauge? And if so hows it work
 

ericbphoto

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Just like clockwork...

Never miss an opportunity to talk bad about my beloved air cooled VW...
All he did was mention an interesting quirk of your VWs.
 

Uncle Gump

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Just curious cause ive only ridden in one air cooled VW ever and i was drunk as piss...

Do they have a temp gauge? And if so hows it work
To the best of my knowledge... the early versions had nothing for temp. But being the fan was belt driven... if the battery light came on... you lost engine cooling.

We would drill and tap a cylinder head and put a gauge in for cylinder head temp. Pretty common to also use a gauge for oil temp.

All he did was mention an interesting quirk of your VWs.
VW's are love hate thing... Walt hates them... and I love them.
 

19Walt93

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If you don't have time to do it right will you have time to do it over?
To the best of my knowledge... the early versions had nothing for temp. But being the fan was belt driven... if the battery light came on... you lost engine cooling.

We would drill and tap a cylinder head and put a gauge in for cylinder head temp. Pretty common to also use a gauge for oil temp.



VW's are love hate thing... Walt hates them... and I love them.
I don't hate them, I'm just honest about them. They're underpowered, noisy, unreliable, and get lousy gas mileage for the sacrifices the driver has to make. It's a rare air cooled VW that passes 40,000 miles without major engine work- usually for a dropped #3 exhaust valve. The engine heat gets blown forward through the uninsulated rocker panels, then fails to warm the interior. The front is so light that steering on snow is treacherous. The gas tank sat in front of the driver and the dash electrics were protected by a sheet of pressed cardboard. I've built over 80 engines for VW's- to the point where I bought a valve guide driver for them when working at a service station. A good running beetle might squeeze out 28 mpg in our hills when a 6 cylinder Maverick would get 30 mpg. I rolled one over at 30 mph trying to get around an illegally parked car on a turn. The has been ex-hippies in Vt love them, probably a residual affect from youthful drug use.
 

Uncle Gump

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Lead, Follow or get out of my way
I don't hate them, I'm just honest about them. They're underpowered, noisy, unreliable, and get lousy gas mileage for the sacrifices the driver has to make. It's a rare air cooled VW that passes 40,000 miles without major engine work- usually for a dropped #3 exhaust valve. The engine heat gets blown forward through the uninsulated rocker panels, then fails to warm the interior. The front is so light that steering on snow is treacherous. The gas tank sat in front of the driver and the dash electrics were protected by a sheet of pressed cardboard. I've built over 80 engines for VW's- to the point where I bought a valve guide driver for them when working at a service station. A good running beetle might squeeze out 28 mpg in our hills when a 6 cylinder Maverick would get 30 mpg. I rolled one over at 30 mph trying to get around an illegally parked car on a turn. The has been ex-hippies in Vt love them, probably a residual affect from youthful drug use.
Yeah... it's a real surprise that the simple little "people's car" has been competing, surviving and winning the likes of the Baja 500 and other off road races in stock form for probably 4 decades.

I'm curious why you just didn't perform the fix for the number 3 cylinder problems. I'll also say that lots of vehicles in that early time frame rarely made it more then 50K without major repairs. And if in 80 engine rebuilds the only tool you needed to buy was a valve guide driver... I'd say it was a fairly good design. If they were taken care of and maintained... they're actually pretty robust.

I will say that they made for poor daily driver in cold climate areas. But they had there place and the front end... transaxle/rear torsion and engine in modified form sure built a bunch of cool off road cars... kit cars... dune buggies rolling through my shop. I've built everything from bone stock 40 horse to Formula V race car engines to 2300 cc drag car stuff. I even electronic fuel injected turbo charged one. I still have a full VW machine shop in storage back in Michigan.

Funny too... the old slug bug still ranks in the top 5 best selling vehicles in the entire world.
 

Forlorn

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thx guys, simple enough driving half a block to straight out the camber
 

19Walt93

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Ford Ranger
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Engine Size
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2WD / 4WD
2WD
Total Drop
3"
Tire Size
235/55R16
My credo
If you don't have time to do it right will you have time to do it over?
Yeah... it's a real surprise that the simple little "people's car" has been competing, surviving and winning the likes of the Baja 500 and other off road races in stock form for probably 4 decades.

I'm curious why you just didn't perform the fix for the number 3 cylinder problems. I'll also say that lots of vehicles in that early time frame rarely made it more then 50K without major repairs. And if in 80 engine rebuilds the only tool you needed to buy was a valve guide driver... I'd say it was a fairly good design. If they were taken care of and maintained... they're actually pretty robust.

I will say that they made for poor daily driver in cold climate areas. But they had there place and the front end... transaxle/rear torsion and engine in modified form sure built a bunch of cool off road cars... kit cars... dune buggies rolling through my shop. I've built everything from bone stock 40 horse to Formula V race car engines to 2300 cc drag car stuff. I even electronic fuel injected turbo charged one. I still have a full VW machine shop in storage back in Michigan.

Funny too... the old slug bug still ranks in the top 5 best selling vehicles in the entire world.
P.T. Barnum explained why they're the 5th best seller, there's a sucker born every minute. In the 60's and early 70's the only fix for the valve problem was to wait for the next failure and fix it again. By the time I was working at the garage I'd already bought the rest of the tools I needed because I built so many engines for myself and my friends' cars in high school. I didn't even mention that VW's ate camshafts or what was necessary to replace them. Chevy and AMC sixes ate cams, too. Pull the valve cover, side cover, timing cover, rockers and pushrods and the cam slid right out once the radiator was removed. A VW had to be completely stripped and the case had to be split to get at the cam. The trans axles were a well engineered, durable piece, the rest of the car, not so much. I wouldn't say "pretty robust", I'd say pretty often busted.
They were designed in the 30's because Hitler wanted a car that would go 50 mph, carry 4 people, and be affordable to the average German. Exactly zero were delivered to civilians, production was switched to build Kubelwagens for the military. In fairness, a late 30's Ford or Chevy had problems, too. But Ford and Chevy didn't sell their outdated designs into the late 70's.
I will defend your right to like them but will not allow anyone to claim they were good, dependable cars. Most guys my age, when they say they wish they had there old beetle are actually saying they want to feel 16 again with the freedom of a new drivers license, they don't want the car back and would quickly want to be rid of it if it was their daily driver. Heck, I met a guy at Carlisle who was driving around in a Trabant and claimed to like it. He seemd to be sober, too.
 

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