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Pilot Bearing NEED HELP


Initialjoe

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So I was just pulling out the transmission this evening to do a clutch job when I came across a problem with the pilot bearing. I couldn't find it. I have a new one and know where to press it in so i tried but it only goes in a little ways before stopping (See pictures). I thought maybe the other bearing is melted in there....but I don't see any ripped metal or signs of one.

I'm stumped and need my truck by the weekend. What should I do?

I have a 1994 Ranger 2.3L Manual





 


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Initialjoe

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Also, I know this is my first post, but I have been reading the forums (before signing up) for a few months now. Very helpful place.
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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I suspect the outer race of the disintegrated pilot bearing is still in there. A small triangle file and a careful groove should get it out. Or perhaps a sharp punch and work it behind the race to collapse it into the center.
 

Big Jim M

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Yep! A good picture of the old pilot bearing in there. Now how to get it out!
I get bearing grease and completely fill the hole with grease. Then I get a rod that exactly fits the inside of that bearing. Next I get my BFH and give the rod a whack. That rod shoving rapidly into the hole pushes the grease against the inside sides of the bearing and OUT IT COMES!

That is the ONLY way I know of to get it out!
Big Jim
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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^^^ yes, I've done that with sintered bronze bushings. It works well. Probably best to try that way first. I wasn't thinking on my previous post. I've even used a tree branch whittled to the right diameter in a late night thrash.
 

enjr44

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Yep, a wooden dowel will do it, too. If that doesn't get it out the next step is to grind/cut it on two sides (Dremel tool??). That race is very very hard metal and has to be fractured (it will not bend). Don't cut into the crank.
 

pjtoledo

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another trick is to run a tap into the hole and try to make some threads in it, if you have a set of big taps.
when I did the 05 there was enough outer race left that I was able put a big bolt (5/8?) into the hole, pulled it down to bind, then hammered the bolt to extract it.


Perry
 

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I had something similar happen to me about 5 years ago. I was swapping a new (used) motor into my 1998 Ranger and put a new clutch in while I had it apart. I ended up renting a tool from a auto parts store and it took less than 20 seconds to have it out after spending hours the previous day trying everything to extract it. Not sure if that helps any but this is what the tool looks like.
 

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I suspect the outer race of the disintegrated pilot bearing is still in there. A small triangle file and a careful groove should get it out. Or perhaps a sharp punch and work it behind the race to collapse it into the center.
another trick is to run a tap into the hole and try to make some threads in it, if you have a set of big taps.
when I did the 05 there was enough outer race left that I was able put a big bolt (5/8?) into the hole, pulled it down to bind, then hammered the bolt to extract it.


Perry
This is a hardened bearing race. You're never going to cut it with a file or a tap. You can grind it away with abrasives, but you can't machine it with cutting tools. If the bearing cooked, it may have softened the steel, but you'll never be able to tell before the point where you're already going to be breaking the cutting edges of your tools.

The hydraulic method (grease + rod) works really well if there's no other passage for the grease to go out. A puller and slide hammer works okay, too; that's what I used on my wheel bearings.
 

Big Jim M

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Spott!
Are you sure about that being a race? I'm sure there may be one somewhere but I have NEVER seen it where ever it is.
All I have ever seen are simple sintered bronze bearings.
As for the puller, I have never seen one like that although I know for sure there should be such. I'll have to get me one of those! Should keep grease off of my shirt!
Big Jim
 

wizkid00104

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Rent a blind hole bearing puller. Makes the job very easy.


Sent from my iPhone
 

enjr44

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Spott!
Are you sure about that being a race? I'm sure there may be one somewhere but I have NEVER seen it where ever it is.
All I have ever seen are simple sintered bronze bearings.
As for the puller, I have never seen one like that although I know for sure there should be such. I'll have to get me one of those! Should keep grease off of my shirt!
Big Jim
Take another look at the first picture. I think that is a pic of the new bearing pushed up against the old. Looks kinda like a race to me. But, I never had a modern (post 90) pilot bearing in my hand.
 

pjtoledo

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This is a hardened bearing race. You're never going to cut it with a file or a tap. You can grind it away with abrasives, but you can't machine it with cutting tools. If the bearing cooked, it may have softened the steel, but you'll never be able to tell before the point where you're already going to be breaking the cutting edges of your tools.

The hydraulic method (grease + rod) works really well if there's no other passage for the grease to go out. A puller and slide hammer works okay, too; that's what I used on my wheel bearings.


the outer shell is the race, its not so hard that it can't be cut with a good file or tap.
however, its really hard to file to file anything in that tight space. a dremel or moto-tool would be ok.

to the OP, clean up the end of the tranny shaft. its probably all chewed up from the needles failing.
 

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Spott!
Are you sure about that being a race? I'm sure there may be one somewhere but I have NEVER seen it where ever it is.
All I have ever seen are simple sintered bronze bearings.
As for the puller, I have never seen one like that although I know for sure there should be such. I'll have to get me one of those! Should keep grease off of my shirt!
Big Jim
You're probably right, now that you mention it.

Forgive me, a lot of my experience is in the bicycle industry, where something called a "bearing" always has hardened steel balls/rollers/needles inside hardened steel races, and solid bronze or plastic pieces are called "bushings". I'm slowly unlearning that, and learning the proper machinist/mechanic terminology.
 
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Andy D

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The top pic showed the PB with needle bearings. The PB for the Rat came out easily I started a sheet rock screw into the bearing cage and grabbed that with a pair of vise grips. White bread , about 4 slices. wadded up and rammed in with a dowel and a SFH will shift the PB too. The traditional PB is a bronze bushing. I watched my brother make one out of a piece of bronze stock on a lathe for his '56 Chevy More modern engines used needle bearings. :D
 


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