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Updating the 4-Cylinder Tech Page - Suggestions Needed


tylerh

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just some info dont know if its useable but here it goes just did a 2.5 swap in my 96 and have had nothing but problems
1. the 2.3 oil pan will fit on the 2.5 except one bolt and useing the 2.3 pickup tube
2. pickup tube clearance issues had to bend
3.oil leaks from rear oil pan seal
4.oil pressure issues at idle

so what i am trying to say is do not use 2.3 parts on a 2.5 or vice versa as the 2.3 pan is to small the pickup tube too short and the back of the pan is almost a 1/16 of an inch off (enough to cause 4inch puddle every time you shut it off) and if you wanna go ahead and do it any ways go ahead but it will cost you your bottom end
and just to add the engine i put in had just under ten thousand kilometers yes 10,000

used the 2.3 oil pan because the 2.5 was cracked
 
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jonnymotox

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But did the 2.5 Pan fit?

I want to put a 2.5 in my 88 and am wondering some ofthe things I might have to deal with. Will it
Bolt right in?
I'm also going to ask this Question on the 4 banger fourm, Thanks
 

Kenneth S

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Ford’s 2.0/2.3/2.5 litre engine family

These motors are commonly referred to as either the Lima or simply the 2.X OHC (Over Head Cam) engines. They started life based on the German designed 2.0 EAO Sport motors that were first introduced to this country in the Mercury Capri’s from the early 70’s. They share nothing with the 2.3-2.5 litre HSC motors that were offered in the passenger car line from ’84-’91. Initially the 2.3 was supposed to be designed so that the 2.0 EAO parts would interchange, but due to different manufacturing processes it was not feasable) according to Ford, a couple of easy ways to tell if you have a 2.0L EAO engine, or a 2.0/2.3/2/5L lima engine is that the 2.0 EAO engine has 10 valve cover bolts while the Lima engine has only 8 valve cover bolts, and the distributor is in front of the number 1 intake port on the EAO engine, while the distributor is under the number 1 intake port on the Lima engine. The 2.3 first debuted in the 1974 Pinto using a progressive 2Bbl Webber/Holley carb and a points distributor. In ’75 they were upgraded to a Duraspark ignition system. They remained unchanged until about ’81 when the intake ports were changed from an oval to a D shape (flat floor). The 2.0/2.3 litre versions that were offered in Rangers starting in ’83 used a different head having four evenly spaced round holes of equal size. A 2.0 litre 1-bbl carbed version was offered in Rangers from ’83-’85, and in ’87-’88 with a 2-bbl in some parts of the US, Canada and Mexico. EFI was added to the engines in ’85. In ’89 the 2.3 was changed to a DIS (Distributorless Ignition System) ignition utilizing a new 8-plug head. This head had larger evenly spaced D-shaped intake ports and was used until the end of production of the 2.5 in ‘01. The 2.5 litre version was only offered from ‘98 To ’01, when the engine was replaced by a 2.3 litre DOHC Duratec based engine.

In ’79-‘81 a high compression drawthru carb’ed turbo version of the 2.3 was offered. In ’83-‘88 a lower compression EFI turbo version was offered in T-birds, Cougars, Mustang SVOs and Merkur XR4Ti’s (through ’89).

Some of the changes to the motor over the years were:
Rear main seal changed from a two piece to a one piece design in ’86.
Roller cams were installed from ’88 on in Rangers and ’91 on in Mustangs.
Crankshaft main journal sizes were reduced starting in ’88.
CPS (Cam Position Sensor) was added starting in ’95 (’94 in California). At this time Ford changed to a 104-pin computer (it was a 60-pin) and moved the DIS functions into the computer, previously the DIS system had a TFI module as a separate unit mounted on the front of the intake manifold.


Major engine specs are
.......................................2.0........ .2.3 Early....2.3 Late.....2.5
Bore...............................3.520........3. 780.........3.780......3.780
Stroke............................3.126........3.126.........3.126......3.401
Bore Spacing...................4.173........4.173...... ...4.173......4.173
Main Journal Dia..............2.3986......2.3986.......2.2055.. ....2.2055
Rod Journal Dia...............2.0468......2.0468.......2.0468. ....2.0468
Con. Rod Length..............5.2047......5.2047.......5.204 7.....5.457
Crank Center to deck.......8.368........8.368.........8.368......8 .368
Piston pin height...............1.583........1.583.........1. 583.....1.2105

Differences between major engine parts are as follows:
Blocks-
2.0 is an underbored 2.3, with the exception of the bore the blocks are identical to all 2.3’s (note the ranger 2.0 block can not be bored out to accept a 2.3 pistons).
’75-’88 2.3’s are interchangeable.
’89-’94 same as ’83-’88 2.3’s but have a smaller main journal saddle, the oil pan seal surface was changed in ‘87 to eliminate the 4 piece seal and holes were added in the front to bolt on the DIS’s crank trigger assembly.
’95-‘01 similar to the ’89-‘95’s but a Cam Position Sensor was added behind the aux sprocket, the hole for the distributor was eliminated and the oil pump was moved in place of the aux. shaft itself.
Turbo blocks are identical to the ’83-’88 Ranger blocks but have an additional boss w/ a hole threaded in the pass. side about ½ way back that provides a place to drain the lubricating oil back into the engine from the turbo.

Cranks-
2.0 and early 2.3 Lima cranks are identical.
Late 2.3 Lima cranks have smaller main journals.
2.5 Lima cranks are identical to 2.3 Lima except they have a longer stroke.
Rods-
2.0 and 2.3 (including turbo) rods are identical up through at least ’94. In fact they still have the original D4 (’74) casting number on them.
Pistons-
The 2.0 pistons are unique and don’t interchange.
The 2.3 pistons are all the same excluding the turbo versions, which were forged. Low compression (8.0-1) in the ’83-‘88’s and high compression (9.0-1) in the ’79-‘81’s.
The 2.5 pistons are similar to the 2.3’s but have a different wrist pin height.

Heads-
All 2.0/2.3/2.5 heads will physically bolt in place of each other, they all have similar exhaust port shape and placement. All cams are interchangeable as long as they are used with the proper followers. Later model ('95 and newer) roller cam followers cannot be easily swapped onto an older head as the valve stem size was reduced in the newer heads and matching slot in the follower was reduced, the 83-88 2.0 carburated Ranger engine and 2.3 carburated Ranger engines have the same small round intake ports spaced evenly apart, they differ from each other in their valve sizes though.


There are several variations on the 2.3 heads though they break down into 4 distinct types:
1. Passenger car oval port heads-’74-’80 Mustang, Pinto, Fairmont, Bobcat, etc.
2. Passenger car D-port head-’81-’95? T-bird, Mustang, Etc.
3. Truck round port- ’83-’88 carburated Ranger
4. Truck D-port- ’89-’01 Ranger. The '89-'94's and '95-'01's have different combustion chambers and ports.

Roller Camshafts
'88-'94 Ranger Roller cam .215" lift at lobe. Lobe is .675 wide
Follower's roller diameter is .900"
'95-'01 Ranger Roller cam .215" lift at lobe. Lobe is .510 wide
Follower's roller diameter is .900"

Head gasket for turbo or any Lima engine (0-27psi)- Fel-pro #1035
Recommended Valve Seals (Good for N/A too)
Intake- E7ZZ-6571-A
Exhaust- E7ZZ-6571-B


Cylinder Head Flow Numbers
D=d-port / T-D= turbo d-port / L-dual= 97-01 dual plug /
E-dual= 88-96 dual plug / Ess-D= Esslinger ported d-port/

inches D T-D Oval Round L-dual E-dual Ess-D ported ARCA
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
.050"---27.55--27.8---28.6---31.0---30.0---27.3---28.1---33.2---33.7
.100"---48.9---54.5---55.9---59.0---58.0---54.9---51.4---65.6---61.3
.150"---61.8---75.4---78.9---77.7---86.7---78.3---76.7--106.5---91.6
.200"---75.2--100.6--100.3--101.6--110.7---96.1--105.5--138.8--122.0
.250"---88.0--120.7--122.3--122.0--130.3--109.4--132.3--169.3--149.8
.300"--101.6--132.3--136.8--135.5--143.3--120.4--156.3--196.5--175.8
.350"--116.5--140.1--146.6--142.7--153.1--128.4--177.7--218.6--198.5
.400"--131.0--144.0--150.5--145.3--158.9--132.3--190.7--234.8--218.6
.450"--144.0--149.2--153.1--145.9--164.1--134.9--199.8--247.1--236.1
.500"--151.8--154.4--156.9--149.2--166.8--136.8--205.6--250.4--252.3
.550"--158.2--159.5--156.3--150.5--168.8--138.8--210.1---------265.9
.600"--163.4--160.8--156.3--151.8--170.2--140.1--214.7---------275.0
.650"----------------------------------------------206.9---------283.1
.700"----------------------------------------------207.6---------290.2

Alot of information from Jspafford is included in this post
 
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jax4bangin

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how bout some duratec stuff!!!!!!:icon_confused:
 

Kenneth S

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There's nothing out there for them, the only thing I found for them was from Ford, they sell a cnc ported head but it only increases airflow by 15%, not worth the around $900.00 price tag IMHO.
 

Kenneth S

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2.3 & 2.5 Timing belt removal & installation

1. Rotate the engine so that No. 1 cylinder is at TDC on the compression stroke. Check that the timing marks are aligned on the camshaft and crankshaft pulleys. An access plug is provided in the cam belt cover so that the camshaft timing can be checked without removal of the cover or any other parts. Set the crankshaft to TDC by aligning the timing mark on the crank pulley with the TDC mark on the belt cover. Look through the access hole in the belt cover to make sure that the timing mark on the cam drive sprocket is lined up with the pointer on the inner belt cover.

2. If the belt is still on the engine and you wan't to check the timing turn the engine in the normal direction of rotation. Backward rotation may cause the timing belt to jump time, due to the arrangement of the belt tensioner, if the belt has stripped teeth, or is broken this doesn't matter.

3. Cooling system, you do not have to completely drain it, just drain it enough so the upper radiator hose can be removed from the thermostat housing and the radiator, it's easier to access the front of the engine if you remove the fan shroud. Remove the fan blade and water pump pulley bolts.

4. Loosen the alternator retaining bolts and remove the drive belt from the pulleys, remove the water pump pulley, if you have power steering rather than removing the whole power steering pump bracket just remove the one idler pulley that partially covers the timing belt cover from the bracket.

5. Remove the four timing belt outer cover retaining bolts and remove the cover. Remove the crankshaft pulley and belt guide.

6. Loosen the belt tensioner pulley assembly, then position a camshaft belt adjuster tool T74P–6254–A or equivalent, (I use a small pry bar) on the tension spring rollpin and retract the belt tensioner away from the timing belt. Tighten the adjustment bolt to lock the tensioner in the retracted position.

7. Remove the timing belt.

8. Install the new belt over the crankshaft sprocket and then counterclockwise over the auxiliary and camshaft sprockets, making sure the lugs on the belt properly engage the sprocket teeth on the pulleys. Be careful not to rotate the pulleys when installing the belt.

9. Release the timing belt tensioner pulley, allowing the tensioner to take up the belt slack. If the spring does not have enough tension to move the roller against the belt (belt hangs loose), it might be necessary to manually push the roller against the belt and tighten the bolt. (They say the spring cannot be used to set belt tension, and a belt tensioner tool must be used on the tensioner assembly, I use the spring tensioner to set the tension on the belt, and have had no problems doing it this way for allmost 25 years).

10. Rotate the crankshaft two complete turns by hand (in the normal direction of rotation) to remove the slack from the belt, then tighten the tensioner adjustment and pivot bolts to specifications. Make sure the belt is seated properly on the pulleys and that the timing marks are still in alignment when No. 1 cylinder is again at TDC/compression.

11. Install the belt guide, crankshaft pulley, timing belt cover, timing belt cover, (idler pulley if you have power steering), water pump pulley, and fan

12. Install upper radiator hose if necessary. Refill the cooling system.

13. Position the alternator and drive belts, then adjust and tighten it to specifications.

14. Start the engine and check the ignition timing. Adjust the timing, if necessary.
 

MikeInIdaho

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I agree with jax4bangin, definitely more info on the duratec mills. I've got one in my b2300 and love it, runs like a top. Maybe do a comparison of the different tuners available for these motors (JET, bamachips, diablosport etc.) to see what ones give the most noticeable performance increases. I was going to get a JET module until a forum member posted some info on the Diablosport tuners. I've also read some posts from people who've used the JET modules and didn't notice any kind of power increase.

I'd also like to know if there is any performance parts interchangeability between the duratecs found in rangers and those found in focii and other cars (like if an aftermarket throttle body for a duratec focus would work for my b2300, underdrive pulleys etc.)
 
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4 plug head on 8 plug system

yes the Dis 8 plug ignition correct pin location to convert the 8 plug system to a 4 plug head
Have you found any information on this as of yet? I have an Esslinger head for my Sprint car that I would love to try on a 2.5L.:icon_bounceblue:
 

hartwrenches

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bellhousing

just something to add to this page might be some words about the bell housing configurations. yes i know the 4.0 bellhousing and 2.3 housing bolt configurations are different but are the 3.0 and 2.3 identical ? does anybody know? i was wondering the same question. i havent found it on any of the tech library headings. i know it seems stupid to ask such a thing, but i was just wondering if they were interchangeable or not. maybe this is something that everyone knows already and i am just not in the loop yet.

john :dntknw:
The 2.3l housing is unique so that other engines can not be bolted to it because the main shaft and bearings aren't designed to handle any more torque or horsepower than the 2.3l , the starter is also on the opposite side.
 

hartwrenches

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timing belt install

2.3 & 2.5 Timing belt removal & installation

1. Rotate the engine so that No. 1 cylinder is at TDC on the compression stroke. Check that the timing marks are aligned on the camshaft and crankshaft pulleys. An access plug is provided in the cam belt cover so that the camshaft timing can be checked without removal of the cover or any other parts. Set the crankshaft to TDC by aligning the timing mark on the crank pulley with the TDC mark on the belt cover. Look through the access hole in the belt cover to make sure that the timing mark on the cam drive sprocket is lined up with the pointer on the inner belt cover.

2. If the belt is still on the engine and you wan't to check the timing turn the engine in the normal direction of rotation. Backward rotation may cause the timing belt to jump time, due to the arrangement of the belt tensioner, if the belt has stripped teeth, or is broken this doesn't matter.

3. Cooling system, you do not have to completely drain it, just drain it enough so the upper radiator hose can be removed from the thermostat housing and the radiator, it's easier to access the front of the engine if you remove the fan shroud. Remove the fan blade and water pump pulley bolts.

4. Loosen the alternator retaining bolts and remove the drive belt from the pulleys, remove the water pump pulley, if you have power steering rather than removing the whole power steering pump bracket just remove the one idler pulley that partially covers the timing belt cover from the bracket.

5. Remove the four timing belt outer cover retaining bolts and remove the cover. Remove the crankshaft pulley and belt guide.

6. Loosen the belt tensioner pulley assembly, then position a camshaft belt adjuster tool T74P–6254–A or equivalent, (I use a small pry bar) on the tension spring rollpin and retract the belt tensioner away from the timing belt. Tighten the adjustment bolt to lock the tensioner in the retracted position.

7. Remove the timing belt.

8. Install the new belt over the crankshaft sprocket and then counterclockwise over the auxiliary and camshaft sprockets, making sure the lugs on the belt properly engage the sprocket teeth on the pulleys. Be careful not to rotate the pulleys when installing the belt.

9. Release the timing belt tensioner pulley, allowing the tensioner to take up the belt slack. If the spring does not have enough tension to move the roller against the belt (belt hangs loose), it might be necessary to manually push the roller against the belt and tighten the bolt. (They say the spring cannot be used to set belt tension, and a belt tensioner tool must be used on the tensioner assembly, I use the spring tensioner to set the tension on the belt, and have had no problems doing it this way for allmost 25 years).

10. Rotate the crankshaft two complete turns by hand (in the normal direction of rotation) to remove the slack from the belt, then tighten the tensioner adjustment and pivot bolts to specifications. Make sure the belt is seated properly on the pulleys and that the timing marks are still in alignment when No. 1 cylinder is again at TDC/compression.

11. Install the belt guide, crankshaft pulley, timing belt cover, timing belt cover, (idler pulley if you have power steering), water pump pulley, and fan

12. Install upper radiator hose if necessary. Refill the cooling system.

13. Position the alternator and drive belts, then adjust and tighten it to specifications.

14. Start the engine and check the ignition timing. Adjust the timing, if necessary.
Do you recomend finding the "actual tdc mark" before reinstalling the belt?
 

maverick1970

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How to video on removing Harmonic Balancer bolt.

I made this video last night that I think would be useful. I used a 22mm socket, with a 3" extension on a breaker bar. Laid it on the driver's side frame, turned the switch 3 times in order to break the bolt loose enough so that it is removable by hand.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VugSkQBxOTk
 

oldjimh

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still a few of us with early diesels..... would like a forum especially for parts - i have all i need to rebuild except piston rings -- HELP!

old jim himself
 

wesley

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I just recently replaced the head gasket in my truck, and I am 99% sure the torque spec for the 2.5L MFI (1998 - 2001) & 2.3L (96-97) head bolts is incorrect.

The correct spec is 51 ft*lbs, then an additional 90 degree turn of the bolt. Maybe someone could verify with a factory manual? I got this information from the head bolt kit and it makes sense, because 51 ft*lbs is very low for the bolt size.
 

Kenneth S

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50 ft lbs, then turn an additional 90 degrees, those head bolts will get tight when you get to the 90 degree mark, I use a Matco 1/2" drive breaker bar that's 3' long, and it bows it enough the make the chrome plating on it crack, and start flaking off the bar if you replace alot of head gaskets like I do. Make sure you use a damn good breaker bar, and socket.
 


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