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Purchasing 1st B2. Need advice

Northidahotrailblazer

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For 12k to 20K. if thats what your willing to spend, i would want that thing to be brand new.... None of those are worth 20K.... If you have that budget why not buy something newer? It seems to me you are trying to spend a lot of money to get something nice, thats sound but you just aren't going to find that.... That white one they want 20K for and they couldn't even undercoat the frame or repaint the under body. They paid maybe 5K for it (that is being high) detailed the heck out of it, drained some oils, put a new belt on it and there trying to make 15k profit on it...... I cant blame them but your not buying something that is new, that as unknown history of engine, transmission, axles, and anything else. also when it leaves the lot there not going to warranty anything.

I would buy something that is super common in Mexico. probably a Toyota 4runner, 90s, 2000s 4 runner. I'm not a Toyota guy at all, but i do understand the rest of the world has toyotas everywhere and it is probably easy to get parts or have them worked on. You have to think about parts availability and who is going to be fixing the issues you have? Heck with your budget you could almost buy a brand new bronco sport and not have any problems with it.
 


RobbieD

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I would buy something that is super common in Mexico.
Perfect excuse! I have ALWAYS wanted a donkey!

And of course, with a cool, brightly painted cart to hitch to it to ride around in.



Seriously, though, if I was in the position of having my heart set on a Bronco II (which I can honestly relate to), and I had a good budget to put put towards one, I would focus on finding one with rock-solid provenance, such as an original owner vehicle with records; or, a quality restored example with receipts for the parts and work. IN ADDITION TO A CLOSE PERSONAL INSPECTION AND TEST DRIVE.

I know that that is very much a "unicorn" situation, but these kinds of vehicles do occasionally come up. My white '94 Ex was an original owner vehicle, always garaged and with a service log, when I simply lucked across it. You have to look constantly and be ready to jump quick when a good one pops up on the radar.

Unfortunately, finding a unicorn takes time and luck. And not necessarily a huge pile of cash. Just "right place, right time".

If you're wanting to get one relatively quickly, you have to look it over in person REAL good, and take it on a LONG test drive. Try to keep emotion out of decision, and put some trust in your gut feeling on the deal. It's still a big risk, on spending a good amount for something and still getting a truck that's not what you expected, or needs unexpected repair. It doesn't help that vehicle prices are so crazy right now, either.

Biggest advice I can suggest: make the seller prove to you that the truck is worth what he's asking.

Wish you well in your search, and good luck!
 
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gstuartw

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I've corrected the last link and the Black 87 is viewable.

@JoshT & @Uncle Gump & @Northidahotrailblazer Thanks for the responses. There is a consensus from the responses so far that the choices are all overpriced and I would agree. Having said that, the adage "What ever you are selling is as valuable as what someone will pay." comes to mind.

Josh, the fact that I didn't realize the wheels are not stock shows I still have a way to go becoming a B2 expert! :giggle:

Uncle Gump, my wife picked that one too. It is a good looking rig.

Northidahotrailblazer, I understand the sticker shock but if they found that one for $5K they won't be doing that much longer. Clean, well preserved or refurbished B2s are climbing in value. The original Bronco's have shot out of sight for most people including myself. The new models can't be had for less than 35K. Check out how prices are trending on Classic.com

There are a few responses throughout the span of this thread that make me realize I might need to explain myself a little better. First off I enjoy the idea of driving a classic vehicle. My dad has always had one or two in the driveway. I drove a '62 Mercedes in high school for a few months in the late 70's. I was a bare bones diesel model, manual transmission of course. He picked it up cheap and it was in average condition and it was a fun vehicle to cruise in and turned heads. Then there was the opportunity to drive a '65 Mustang convertible for year in college. Fast forward to the early 90's and my wife agreed to let me buy a '62 Chevy step side. The most recent was a '88 Jeep Grand Wagoner that I recently sold. It needed a refurbishment/restoration and I was not prepared money or time wise to take it on. Though it would have been cool to drive it in Mexico the streets there are narrow and I'm sure it'd be sideswiped eventually.

"Why not buy a car in Mexico?" some ask. Well the pool of quality classic cars is much smaller there. Until about 10 years ago Mexicans could not finance a car. That and that the average income in Mexico is much lower means people hold on to their cars much longer than in the US. Mexicans keep things that are working no matter the age. Others say that if you are going to spend X amount you might as well buy new. Because I have Permanent Resident status in Mexico I have very specific parameters to operate in where it comes to bringing a car in. I can't just bring any car in, it has to have been manufactured in a NAFTA country and be of a specific age. I couldn't buy 5 year old car in the states and bring it in. Classics are treated differently.

Most of you would probably agree there is something special above driving a classic vehicle. You're alive and engaged when you do. There is likely no complacency like when you drive today's tight handling, well equipped vehicles. Driving down the road in a classic you're aware of the road and your vehicle's condition. The slop in the wheel, the lean when you corner, the rattle that might be getting worse and the looks you get when you pull in for gas. I'll always love a classic. A nice looking, original condition B2 is just the next in the line of classics I'll own.

Thanks again for the input, I'll keep you updated!
 

gstuartw

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If you're wanting to get one relatively quickly, you have to look it over in person REAL good, and take it on a LONG test drive. Try to keep emotion out of decision, and put some trust in your gut feeling on the deal. It's still a big risk, on spending a good amount for something and still getting a truck that's not what you expected, or needs unexpected repair. It doesn't help that vehicle prices are so crazy right now, either.

Biggest advice I can suggest: make the seller prove to you that the truck is worth what he's asking.

Wish you well in your search, and god luck!
Excellent points, thanks.
 

JoshT

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The most recent was a '88 Jeep Grand Wagoner that I recently sold. It needed a refurbishment/restoration and I was not prepared money or time wise to take it on. Though it would have been cool to drive it in Mexico the streets there are narrow and I'm sure it'd be sideswiped eventually.

Most of you would probably agree there is something special above driving a classic vehicle. You're alive and engaged when you do. There is likely no complacency like when you drive today's tight handling, well equipped vehicles. Driving down the road in a classic you're aware of the road and your vehicle's condition. The slop in the wheel, the lean when you corner, the rattle that might be getting worse and the looks you get when you pull in for gas. I'll always love a classic. A nice looking, original condition B2 is just the next in the line of classics I'll own.
While I understand the narrow streets thing, that Wagoneer would have been an excellent choice IMO. If I ever get in the position of needing a 4 door family SUV that is somewhat offroad capable, that's near the top of my list. I'm a Ford guy, but there's just something special about those Wagoneers.

You definitely don't have to explain the classic car thing to us. Just look at my sig. Ideally I'd like to narrow the vehicle list down to the 85 Ranger, 68 F-100, and maybe a classic car of some sort. Until I get the first to to the point of being daily driver and cross country trip reliable, the F-250 and Kia ain't going anywhere. The 99 is debatable, sell or AWD V8 swap, but I've already got two ongoing projects. I'm pretty sure most of these guys are just recommending something newer as a more practical solution for your situation given the provided price point. Any of them will try to help you get what you want set up how you want it.
 

RumPunch

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That low mileage white and red manual rig looks like a well maintained great example. The asking price... whew!

I couldn't spend that much to do what I would do with it.

But if you NEED one... that little truck should fill that need.
Gump did you notice the red painted engine block? For sure not factory and questionably concerning to me as they divulged "unknown mileage". I think a very steep price on the white/red manual with what looks like the engine has been out of before. Pretty high if it has 172k
 

Uncle Gump

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I did not and I was on my phone.

I do know that the asking prices on these Bronco II's make me think I should just finish mine up and put a for sale sign on it.
 

4x4prepper

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> Are those LED headlights? Any parts availability issues for putting those back to stock?

I imagine you just swap them out for a H6054 bulb for $12

> Is that auto tranny really that bad? Even in light use/demand and probably 8k miles a year?

No, I have had a few, BUT, when they hit 140,000 they are on borrowed time. The thing is you are going to be remote, so, getting one shipped to you and installed is not going to be with the same ease as if you lived in Atlanta GA or Dallas TX. Divorcing it from the radiator and it having it's own separate cooler can go a long ways to keeping it living longer.

1988 Ford Bronco II $21,995
manual transmission, manual transfer case, manual hubs
power everything

1986 Ford Bronco II $19,900
automatic transmission, manual transfer case, manual hubs
nice bumper and a winch
manual locks and windows

1988 Ford Bronco II XLT $12,900
electric transfer case, auto hubs, automatic
electric windows and doors

1987 Ford Bronco II - $14,900
electric transfer case, auto hubs, automatic
electric windows and doors

I think they are all crazy expensive, but, the market is what it is.

The 1986 is the one most likely to be the most trouble free and inexpensive to own, plus, it has a winch and good bumper which you would need and want anyway.

The privately owned black 1987 is the one that speaks to me the most as being genuine and not a "respray" in white to hide stuff with swapped in interiors and such.

These vehicles are 33+ years old, the wiring is not going to last forever. I can tell you from experience fixing these at the dealership, the wiring corrodes in the front where it crosses the radiator, with one or both sides of the windows and locks not working. That was 20 years ago. The 1989 Ford F-150 I am restoring, both door locks were frozen dead and only one window worked. It basically needs new plastic fuel lines (EFI) and much of the vacuum lines under the hood are compromised too.

less wiring = less headaches

---> That being said, I think I would go for the black 1987.

I believe the grill, right fender, and hood were repainted or replaced. Probably from this "but it is not practical for an inexperienced driver." To me it is an original old survivor and not a beat to death vehicle redone to turn a buck. The interior is clean, but, faded as you would expect. It probably has about $800 just in new parts of what is listed. The locking center console with cup holders is nice.

I would ditch the auto hubs for manuals, then buy replacement spares from rockauto or lmc for the window/door switches and the selector switch on the transfer case and dash.

Then buy a good front bumper and winch for it.

It appears to be a "pleasing" kind of ride.

Plus, thinking a bit more about being in Mexico, you might not want to have the white ones that say "look at me", I have no idea what OPSEC is!
 

JoshT

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No, I have had a few, BUT, when they hit 140,000 they are on borrowed time. The thing is you are going to be remote, so, getting one shipped to you and installed is not going to be with the same ease as if you lived in Atlanta GA or Dallas TX. Divorcing it from the radiator and it having it's own separate cooler can go a long ways to keeping it living longer.
Actually I wouldn't do that. Add an auxiliary cooler, but don't disconnect it from the radiator. AFT needs to be in a temperature range to work right. The stock cooler helps to get the fluid up to the temperature it needs to be. The aux cooler helps to remove excess heat without dumping it into the radiator.
 

4x4prepper

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> but don't disconnect it from the radiator.

I have actual real world experience with this, absolutely disconnect it from the radiator. Especially if you have a 1990s Dodge because when they overheat, it takes out the transmission. The latest vehicle I have done this to was on my 4x4 1985 E-250 (since sold), I removed the factory transmission cooler and replaced it with a 25K GVW cooler from Summit isolated from the radiator. In HotLanta I had had zero problems with the transmission on road towing trailers, including a 28 foot triple axle, or off road skidding logs and pulling down trees.

imho, Not changing the fluid every 25k miles or every year if towing, is the biggest killer of the A4LD. Followed by heat stroke after a 2.9L blows a head. If I owned a A4LD right now, it would get a divorced transmission cooler.
 

gstuartw

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I have no idea what OPSEC is!
Haha! The OPSEC is pretty much "Don't sell drugs and the bad guys will leave you alone!"

Speaking of Mexico, I'm down there right now and skimming through the Facebook Marketplace. Seems there are a few good looking B2's down here that I might consider. Just what I want, manual with crank windows. At the prices I'm seeing I can afford to have the engine and tranny rebuilt off the bat as well as other items. Just the savings on possibly shipping a vehicle from one of the corners of the US to Dallas along with importation costs and I've paid for the engine rebuild.

88 Dark Blue priced at 82,000 pesos or 4,100 US

86 Med Blue priced at 115,000 pesos or 5,750 US

88 Green priced at 155,000 pesos or 7,750 US You have to get a kick out of the custom headliner!
 
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4x4prepper

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I like the 1986 the best, manual everything. The 1st 1988 is not 4x4, though at least it has the spare tire carrier.

Since these all look like they are repaints, I would make sure the vehicle was not stolen. Look under the vehicle, under the rear seat where the body seam goes left to right, if you have rust through there, you know it is everywhere. Plus, it tells you it was probably a northern truck. The floor split under the driver's seat is sort of common, especially with bad body mounts.
 

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