• Welcome Visitor! Please take a few seconds and Register for our forum. Even if you don't want to post, you can still 'Like' the posts that you read.

BFG KO2, General Grabbers ATX for 2005 Ford Ranger


JohnnyO

Moderator Emeritus
Forum Staff - Retired
Joined
Jan 6, 2002
Messages
4,613
Reaction score
604
Points
113
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Vehicle Year
2008
Make / Model
Sport Trac
Engine Type
4.0 V6
Engine Size
4.0
Transmission
Automatic
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Total Lift
2.5''
Tire Size
245/70-17
My credo
"I'm not Mr. Lebowski, YOU'RE Mr. Lebowski. I'm The Dude."
BFG and General A/T's are both highly rated for snow performance and both are severe winter rated, i.e. the same as dedicated snow tires.
All-terrains are better in snow than mud-terrains. For good snow tread you want a large number of small edges as opposed to a mud-terrain that has a small number of large edges.
If you don't mind keeping two sets of tires then for winter Bridgestone Blizzaks are totally the shiznit. I've had them on my wife's last few cars and minivans and she won't roll on anything else. Her minivan goes as good in snow as my 4wd and probably stops and turns better. Dedicated snow tires have softer rubber and are better on ice. Firestone Winterforce are also very good and cost a bit less than Bridgestones. Personally I am not a fan of studs in the tires, I think they hurt more than help.
Since you're new to snow get some winter driving tips from your friends and neighbors. The keys are don't drive too fast, be smooooth, and pretend there are eggs under the gas and brake pedals and try not to break them. In snow and ice the pedal on the left doesn't always make it stop, the pedal on the right doesn't always make it go, and the round thing in your hands doesn't always make it turn.
 


Rock Auto 5% Discount Code: 80CBDBD15DC160 Expires: January 4th, 2021

wildbill23c

Well-known member
U.S. Military - Veteran
TRS Banner 2012-2015
TRS 20th Anniversary
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
3,417
Reaction score
288
Points
83
Location
Southwestern Idaho
Vehicle Year
1988
Make / Model
Ford Bronco II
Engine Type
2.9 V6
Transmission
Automatic
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Total Lift
0
Total Drop
0
Tire Size
235/75-R15
My credo
19K, 19D, 92Y, 91F
I had the KO's on my 08 Tundra, they came out with the KO2's after I'd spent way too much money on the KO's. Can't say anything about the KO2's but the previous version sucked in snow/ice they had too heavy of a tread to really grip anything...took a good 50-60 miles of higher speed driving to get them warmed up enough that they'd actually provide decent traction LOL. I have Cooper Discoverer AT3 4S tires on my 98 Jeep Grand Cherokee they seemed to do pretty well last winter. Snow is one thing, but driving on ice is a completely different game. For Ice you really need studded tires to get any sort of traction, or chains at that point, no matter what tires you have they're not going to give you any grip on solid ice. I carry chains with me, haven't had to use them for a long time, but I still have them just in case, where it could save you from having to call a wrecker.

In a pickup there's no weight in the back hardly at all, so if you have 2WD adding weight in the bed helps a lot....if you have 4WD it'll help get you moving but generally doesn't help you stop or turn, it just gets you to the scene of the crash faster....here in Idaho the first ones you find in ditches and fields are the guys in their jacked up 4x4 trucks and SUV's, while all the little 2WD cars keep right on going, they may be slower but they'll at least get where they're going.
Leave sooner to get to your destination on time, if you are running behind, speeding up may lead you to the hospital or worse, so take your time, better late than never. Drive defensively, don't count on the other guy seeing you, stopping, or getting out of the way. Look way down the road ahead of you and around you for potential accident causers....and for god sakes don't be playing on your phone while driving.

Be easy on the accelerator and brakes....sudden applications of either tend to get you into trouble instead of helping. Slow down, ignore the idiots flying by you, if you pass them as they're sitting in the ditch up the road make sure to honk, wave and smile as you drive by knowing at least you will get where you are going by driving cautiously.

If you have a manual transmission you may find it helpful to start off in 2nd gear it'll help keep you from spinning the tires as bad trying to take off from a stop. Not much you can do with these newer automatics as they don't allow you to start in 2nd gear anymore. If you have 4WD, use it, just remember it may help you get going 55mph but its not going to help you slow down, steer, or stop....well if you know what you are doing it can help but for new winter drivers its best to pretend you have 2WD because that 4WD knob, switch, or lever will just get you into more trouble if you aren't careful with it.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

2.9 Mafia
Supporting Member
TRS 20th Anniversary
Joined
Oct 31, 2018
Messages
6,605
Reaction score
4,719
Points
113
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Vehicle Year
1988
Make / Model
Ranger
Engine Size
2.9l Trinity
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
My credo
Give 'yer balls a tug. Fight me.

Tavery

New member
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Points
1
Location
Missouri
Vehicle Year
2005
Make / Model
XLT4x4,4.0,auto
Transmission
Automatic
Did you get the Cooper discovery? I'm looking as well and run these on my F150 (very good tires for it)
 


Top