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31x10.5x5


mywhip

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I am aware that they will fit on stock rims, with stock life (2k ford ranger supercab). My problem though is that during winter time i get horrible traction with my back tires (RWD) but not the front tires grabbing for turning. Would it be sensible to put 31x10.5x5's on the back, and keep my stock tires up front?

Actually came across these and wanting to know if they will be any good for daily driving/winter?

https://www.treadwright.com/p-23-235-75r15-atg-p.aspx
 
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srteach

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I've driven street slicks in winter snow and had them work very well because of the weight of the truck (1970 4dr longbed International 1110). Tires have very little effect on traction if you know how to drive correctly.

The answer is to think weight distribution. Truck design puts the majority of the weight over the front wheels (engine, trans, etc). That is the reason you get good traction with the front wheels. The weight of the rear end includes the axle and the bed, which is comparatively light. The frame weight is distributed about evenly.

If you want more traction, add weight to the rear for the winter.

Thinking about tires, more contact surface from wider or larger diameter tires only makes the weight per square inch less. This means less grip if everything else is unchanged.

In my ranger, I usually add about 150-200 lbs of sand right over the rear wheels. If I do get stuck, use a bag of the sand to enhance traction and buy another bag when I'm unstuck.

That said, drive whatever tires you like, as long as you distribute the weight properly.
 
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Original_Ranger84

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Actually even if you know how to drive tires make a MASSIVE difference in traction... they however make little difference if they can't put the traction on the ground. Like srteach said the rear is very light compared to the front so there is less weight pushing down on the tires giving you less traction. not to mention the rear tires are the drive tires and will be continuously trying to break traction pushing the truck forward as the front tires just have to roll and turn.

And yes those tires will help out but if I was you I would get a studded winter tire if you can I find the studless work way better on awd cars like subi's or 4x4's.

Another thing I have found (not followed but found) is skinnier is better in the winter, get some 225 or 215's and they will give you much better winter grip.
 


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