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Towing capacity?


Blmpkn

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This is what I'm throwing around in my mind too, like sarge mentioned too about the boost its really kind of one of those things is it really worth it. I don't do much towing....I do plan on getting a sub-compact tractor and some implements/attachments in the future, however it would push that new Ranger a lot to tow something like that, so I'd want a larger truck for that, but to take a camping trip once in a while within 150-200 miles of home with a 2-3k camp trailer it might be ok for that task, but if I were doing it daily I'd certainly want a different truck I'd think.

So many things to really think about deep down, and nobody rents them to be able to say rent one for a week and see if it would really be what I'd need/want.
My old 2010 2.3 manual got 26-27 mpg empty, but when I had my wheeler in the back that figure dropped quite a bit. I'd use a quarter of a tank just getting to and from wherever we would go riding.. a total of 1 hour driving at max, on backroads.

With the wheeler in the back at highway speeds, it got 12 mpg lol. The new truck definitely does better than that, even with more than twice the weight. It may not be MUCH better, but better none the less.
 


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don4331

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The power is certainly there. I personally wouldn't use any ecoboost engine to do any heavy towing on a regular basis. I just don't think the engines are designed to be in boost mode all the time. For occasional full weight duty or hauling a small or medium size utility trailer on a regular basis, I don't think there would be an issue. I also don't think it would be a great idea to do a tour across the country at the max tow rating. Again, this is just my opinion.
There are a lot of F-150s with Ecoboost engines doing heavy towing on a regular basis and the forums aren't lit up with owner's having engines blowing up like grenades. They aren't your grandpa's turbo engines.

So, while I personally wouldn't tour the country at max tow rating, the truck was designed to it.

Actually, I might need to take that back...my twice annual trips from Regina to Ottawa/Toronto through the '90s were close to GCWR (probably exceeding with snow/ice build up a couple times). A new Ranger would be sooo much more comfortable to do it.
 
Last edited:

bobbywalter

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If you have e rated tires, that usually negates needing a load distribution hitch
Well that's total BS..... Load range has nothing to do with weight distribution. I take that back, it has a little to do with it but having load range E tires doesn't mean you don't need a weight distribution hitch. I'd recommend an E2 weight distribution hitch. They are easy to use, easy to install and do sway control too.
[/QUOTE]

Load distributing hitch and stock ranger should not be a thing.


I am speaking within the envelope of a normal ranger.


If you need a load distributing hitch you need e tires.

Because your load is out of hand.
 


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