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winter tires for the escape


racsan

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just got a 2011 escape awd after thanksgiving. has good tires but they are touring tires and not really suitable for snow. got a set of used escape 16" alloys the other day and want to get some winter tires, thinking of going a little smaller on size, say a 225/65/16 ( stock is 235/70/16) want the narrower footprint and a slightly smaller height. any reason that would be a bad idea? and also- im not buying tpms sensors, Im sure i'll have a tire pressure dash light but other than that would there be any issues? I can keep check on my own tire pressures and dont need a idiot system for that. love the escape, its quite a hot-rod. with decent tires it could be quite a snow eater.
 


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Uncle Gump

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smaller tire... less clearance...
 

Josh B

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Use those tire sizes XXX/XX VS XXX/XX in a search and you'll find diameter, circumference, % calculations etc which will tell you ride height difference, revolutions per mile, difference in speedometer etc.
I found those numbers to be very handy when switching from 265-235 a few years ago.
You can also double check it using mile markers on an open stretch of turnpike or interstate to know exactly where it landed and transfer that info into knowing exactly what it did to the speedometer reading
 

Dirtman

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Why would you want a narrower footprint? Kinda defeats the purpose of a snow tire. Snow tires are made to float not dig.
 

racsan

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central ohio
Vehicle Year
1994 (mostly)
Make / Model
ford
Engine Type
2.3 (4 Cylinder)
Engine Size
2.3/140-4
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
2WD
Tire Size
225/70/15
My credo
built, not bought
yes, but when you have a wet slushy snow, I feel its better to have the narrowest profile so I dont hydroplane on the slush. the backroads around here don’t always get cleared off good and the wide tires just dont work as well for me.
 

Dirtman

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Dirtman

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I only mock because rain tires (all weather) and snow tires are waaaaay different. So if you go narrow for that reason, don't spend the money on snow tires... snow tires are made to grab and bite snow and ice and stay on top, not dig. If you're only worried about hydroplaning that's a whole different ball game. I dont know what a good middle ground tire is but a snow tire is the opposite of an all weather.
 


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