Why is it so hard to get this damn axle out?!


HighMileage93

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Swapping in DJM drop beams on my 93 and having a hell of a time getting the old axle out on the drivers side. Everything was going smooth until the spindle wouldn't pop out. I had to cut the end off the lower to finally get it to let go of the ball joint shaft. Removing the coil spring went normal but I can't get the bolt out to remove the axle from the radius arm. Any Ideas?
 


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ericbphoto

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Are you talking about the big bolt under the spring that holds the axle beam to the radius arm? Big impact wrench and persistence. I think they are loc-tited from the factory and very tight.
 

Bird76Mojo

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I had to keep oiling the ends and the side of the long bolt that hold the beam/radius arm together, and then keep spinning it with an impact in both directions. You can see the side of the bolt because the beam is cut out in that area, which makes oiling it super easy.

If you've got both nuts removed from the bolt, then it should eventually spin right out with an impact..



GB :)
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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Eric is right, there is factory locktite. Use heat and a snipe. [snipe=long piece of pipe to fit over breaker bar]
 

HighMileage93

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Got it. Heat, PB Blaster, impact, hammer, heat, PB Blaster, impact, hammer, hammer, Hammer, OUT. LOL
Got to put the passenger side back together now and the front is finished.
I'll let you know when the rear flip starts to go sideways. LOL
 

HighMileage93

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Wasn't thinking that the Toe-in would be so far off after the front drop! Measured from the treads on the tires (I know) just to get an idea. Front of tire 55-3/4". Rear of tire from same tread 54-1/4". That's around 1-1/2" of Toe-OUT! I have never messed with Toe. Which way do I need to turn the adjusters to bring the front side IN? Just need to get it closer so it's at least drivable so I can get in for the alignment.
 

ericbphoto

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That's adjusted by the tie rod ends. With steering wheel centered, adjust both sides the same amount. To bring the front of the tires closer together, turn the tie rod adjustments so that you are shortening the tie rod length. In other words. As you turn them, you will begin to see less exposed threads on the tie rod ends.
 

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There is a special tool that makes it much easier to turn the adjuster. A pipe wrench isn't it...as I found out the hard way. I ended up making my own but you can probably borrow one from a parts place,
link to my post is #69
 

ericbphoto

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There is a special tool that makes it much easier to turn the adjuster. A pipe wrench isn't it...as I found out the hard way. I ended up making my own but you can probably borrow one from a parts place,
link to my post is #69
That’s a good idea. The proper tool is the best way. I haven’t had any trouble turning mine with pliers. But I don’t live in the rust belt and, as mentioned, I put anti-seize on the threads when I had it apart.
 
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HighMileage93

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Do you happen to know which way to turn the adjusters to bring the front in? Over the top or from under the bottom?

That's adjusted by the tie rod ends. With steering wheel centered, adjust both sides the same amount. To bring the front of the tires closer together, turn the tie rod adjustments so that you are shortening the tie rod length. In other words. As you turn them, you will begin to see less exposed threads on the tie rod ends.
 

HighMileage93

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That's adjusted by the tie rod ends. With steering wheel centered, adjust both sides the same amount. To bring the front of the tires closer together, turn the tie rod adjustments so that you are shortening the tie rod length. In other words. As you turn them, you will begin to see less exposed threads on the tie rod ends.
With the steering wheel locked center, the drivers side looks farther out than the passenger side.
 

ericbphoto

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Ford Ranger
Engine Type
3.0 V6
Engine Size
3.0L
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2WD / 4WD
4WD
Total Lift
6"
Tire Size
35"
My credo
In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are different.
In that case, adjust that side more than the other. After making an adjustment, you need to drive the truck back and forth a bit to allow the suspension to relax before measuring to see if you need to adjust it more. You can also put rollers and plates under the front wheels to allow things to move while you adjust it. There are several articles in the "How To Tech" section of this site that will lead you through an alignment and help you understand the steering on these trucks. CLICK HERE for one of those articles. It isn't terribly hard. The first time I did it was after installing my lift kit. I then took it to a shop to have it professionally checked. But Their machine showed that I already had it within spec's.

Do you happen to know which way to turn the adjusters to bring the front in? Over the top or from under the bottom?
I don't remember. Just try it and see how the measurements change. You won't hurt anything.
 


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