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Where is my oil going?


Therigwelder

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I have a 93 ranger 2.3.The truck has black oily soot all over the lower panel and bumper.it does not smoke at all.I am putting a quart of oil in daily.since it doesn't smoke I made an assumption the oil was being lost from the exhaust valve guides or stem seals, apparently I was wrong.I replaced the original cylinder head with one from a known running good engine and installed a head gasket set.I thought I fixed the problem but I checked the dip stick and the oil pan is empty again.I have found no oil leaks.the truck runs great so I am rather confused on where the oil is going,anyone got any ideas?
 


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Bgunner

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The "oily black soot all over the lower panel and bumper" what panel are you referring to? Rear quarter panel?

If so then you are burning it or at least it is getting into the exhaust.

Have you done a compression test on all of the cylinders after the work was performed?

EDIT: Valve stem seals signs is a few puffs of Blueish grey smoke on the engines first start of the day or after sitting 6+ hours, often needs more time if they are just starting to leak. As you have described the issue it sounds like piston rings so my question is have you done a compression test after the work was performed?
 
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Therigwelder

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Yes rear quarter,no I haven't done a compression test after the repair.i am convinced I am not burning oil,a quart of two of oil daily and this truck would be smoking like a freight train.the only way I know of oil getting into the exhaust only is bad guides or stem seals.i got no fouled or oil burned spark plug electrodes are tan /white colored.i drive this truck a 1000 miles a week and surely would see if it was smoking.the head gasket is good no oil in water or vice versa
 

Bgunner

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Have you looked in the radiator and under the oil cap? Is there a milky whitish substance under the oil cap or oil in the radiator/over flow bottle?

A compression test will tell you a lot about how the cylinders are doing at the moment. A cheap tester can be had from Harbor Freight and do well for the home mechanic.

Are you puffing black smoke or have other signs of running a rich fuel air mix?
 
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Therigwelder

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I have a compression tester,I will test this weekend,not chugging any color,yeah I pulled the rad cap and looked in the reservoir.maybe a vacuum test would be inorder as well,may be able to better tell a valve problem.i won't get a good compression reading if by chance I have a valve guide issue?
 

Bgunner

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A vacuum tester will better tell if there is a valve issue but both rings and a valve seating issue will show as low compression. Rings only will show as low compression but low to good vacuum where as a bad valve, valve seat or guides will show as both bad compression and show on up on the vacuum test as a bouncing needle. A bad valve seating issue would show up as a drivability issue especially in a 4 cylinder.

If I am understanding the issue correctly, the oil consumption issues were there before the head replacement and are still present. This would point towards the lower end, rings being the issue as long as all parts installed were good and no gaskets have blown since the install. With the statement of oily black residue on the lower rear quarter panel says to me that oil is some how going through the tail pipe. You need to determine whether the rings are bad or there is a crack in the head letting oil into the exhaust port. Since the issue is still there with a new head/known good head this says to me rings are the more likely the cuprite but testing is needed to to be sure my suspicions are correct.

Check out the tech section for a good visual representation of bad valves and other issues using a Vacuum gauge. I have found this one spot in the tech section invaluable when using a vacuum gauge. https://www.therangerstation.com/tech/dealing-with-engine-vacuum/
 
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Therigwelder

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I should have just pulled the engine and rebuilt the whole damn engine
 

Ramcharger90

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Pretty much....
 


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