WHAT DID YOU DO TO YOUR RANGER TODAY?


sgtsandman

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Finally got around to trimming the plastic wheel well liner on the driver's side where the 31X10.5R15 tire was rubbing at full lack to the left. And wet sanded the second primer coat on the windshield visor. Next step. First coat of paint.
 


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85_Ranger4x4

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Discovered when putting D28 radius arms on a D35 axle the holes that attach it to the beam need to be drilled out.

Also painted the shock brackets/ubolts and cleaned the sway bar brackets... whose paint was perfectly preserved via a thick coating of 2.8 excretions.
 

Icedcoffeenvodka

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Hi. I changed the camshaft positioning sensor in my 99 4x4 With the motor still in and without taking off anything. But it did take me 2 days to find it. But I did it!
Thank you for listening. Good night.
 

91stranger

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Nice name "icedcoffenvodka" I don't like coffee but vodka normally help make the taste buds not care anymore lol
 

Bird76Mojo

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I got my Hella 100w fog lights on my 2001 working again today. I had thee separate electrical connections that had corroded internally inside the various connectors, but from the outside, visually, they looked fine. Continuity testing saved the day.

If you want your truck to live a long life and not get totaled out from hitting deer, I highly suggest a good set of long distance fog/driving lights. They've saved me from hitting more deer than I could possibly count. I see them from 1/2 mile away. It's still my best Ranger mod to date. (besides the V8 swap on my 87 lol)
 

racsan

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That’s why I have a grill guard, right now the noise off the bias-ply front tires probably keep the deer away. Painted my grill today, new steering parts arrived via ups but at 5:15 pm so that’s tomorrow’s project. Will be nice (and different) not having extra play in the steering and unexpected road wander.
 

Bird76Mojo

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The loud hum of my mud tires will sometimes make the deer dart out in to the highway at the last second. You never know..

I've seen countless trucks that received MORE damage due to the grille guard folding back in to the hood, headlights, fenders, grille, front fascia under the headlights, etc.. Depending on the style of guard. They're just too weak to handle an impact from a deer without folding and conforming to the front end of the truck. They're only good for guarding against driving through light brush.

https://www.yotatech.com/forums/f2/front-end-damage-repair-forward-wall-engine-bay-bend-replace-292382/



https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/brush-guards-are-damage-multipliers.84483/



https://www.clubxterra.org/threads/2011-grill-guard-heed-the-warnings.39121/







 

8thTon

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I've hit several deer over the years, but never in the dark. They're on the move at dusk and dawn at various times of the year, but the fog lights won't help much then. On the other hand, modded lights are inconsiderate at best, and dangerous at worst - there is a reason there are regulations on lights. We could all do that of course, but it wouldn't be a great idea to have a free-for-all on headlights.
 

85_Ranger4x4

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I've hit several deer over the years, but never in the dark. They're on the move at dusk and dawn at various times of the year, but the fog lights won't help much then. On the other hand, modded lights are inconsiderate at best, and dangerous at worst - there is a reason there are regulations on lights. We could all do that of course, but it wouldn't be a great idea to have a free-for-all on headlights.
* unless you have a new truck with OEM LED's... then anything goes (I think)

I have a grille guard on my DD, yeah it might cause more damage but I don't drive a model T where I can only replace half the hood, half the bumper or half the grille anyway. I just want to keep the giant rats out of the radiator/trans cooler/condensor so I don't get stranded. I do run my Hellas on gravel roads (which sit on said grille guard) As soon as I see anybody I shut them off, they are very nice to have going up and down hills though.

It is also nice for pushing over grass/weeds, cornstalks and small trees when on the farm too.

I have hit one deer, it spun around the side and caught the rear of the wheel arch, grille guard would have done nothing. Got a new bumper, fender and OEM fender flare out of it.
 

Ranger850

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I've hit several deer over the years, but never in the dark. They're on the move at dusk and dawn at various times of the year, but the fog lights won't help much then. On the other hand, modded lights are inconsiderate at best, and dangerous at worst - there is a reason there are regulations on lights. We could all do that of course, but it wouldn't be a great idea to have a free-for-all on headlights.
It's not the headlights, it's the angle that they are shining. The problem is when the front of the truck is lifted with a "lift kit" and the truck looks like it is sagging in the rear, the angle of the light changes, and is aimed right into the on comers eyes, or some ones rear view mirror. The lights can be as bright as the sun, as long as they point to the road. Also studies have shown that OEM headlights are far from superior to aftermarket lights. Ford and BMW were some of the worst, if I could only remember where I read that.

I couldn't copy with a link, so I copied an article, it's not the one I originaly read, but whatever ….


Car Headlight Performance Found to Be Not So Bright

Mirroring Consumer Reports' test results, a new IIHS study shows that cars can overdrive their low-beam visibility
By Jen Stockburger
March 30, 2016
0 SHARES












A new study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety finds that among 31 vehicles tested for car headlight performance, only one earned IIHS's top Good rating: the Toyota Prius V with LED lamps. Mirroring Consumer Reports test results, this first-ever car headlight ratings evaluation by IIHS shines light on how lamps are underperforming.
In fact, 19 vehicles received Poor or Marginal scores for their disappointing performance. The worst performer in the IIHS tests was the BMW 3 Series equipped with halogen headlamps.
If those results are surprising to you, they weren’t to us. Although we would agree that headlights have improved over the past decade, we still feel there is room for more advancement, especially for straight-ahead low-beam seeing distances that matter most. And the 3 Series also scored poorly in our tests.
Since 2004, Consumer Reports has evaluated car headlight performance as part of our comprehensive battery of tests. Our ratings have provided insight not only into which cars help you see better at night but also how the lighting industry is faring overall and which technologies offer better potential for seeing at night. (Learn more about how Consumer Reports tests cars.)
Although IIHS conducts its car headlight test a bit differently than we do, the concepts behind it are much the same. Both tests assess how far ahead the headlights illuminate, and both are conducted on dark nights. Further, both ratings evaluate both low and high beams, and they give the greatest emphasis to low- beam seeing distances, reflecting how lights are most often used.
IIHS notes that spending more money doesn’t necessarily buy improved visibility, as many of the Poor-rated headlights came on luxury vehicles. Our own ratings have found that while newer technologies such as high-intensity discharge (HID) and now LED headlights typically provide brighter and often more visibility to the sides of the road, they don’t necessarily provide added visibility straight ahead. As those higher-tech lights often come on high-end vehicles, our test findings seem to be in alignment.
How IIHS' and Consumer Reports' Tests Differ
Some key differences in the testing methodologies may help explain why some vehicles may not rate similarly.
  • Lamp aim: For the IIHS tests, headlights are tested in an ‘as received’ condition, meaning that the vertical aim of the headlamps is not adjusted from how the car was set at the factory. We center the aim all headlights before our tests. A vehicle where we raise the lamps, for example, might receive better ratings in our tests than in IIHS’ because of that adjustment and vice versa if we were to lower the lamps. By not adjusting the lamp aim, IIHS is hoping to draw added attention to the fact that aim adjustment can help headlight performance and that the consumer shouldn’t necessarily be tasked with making those corrections.
  • Curve evaluation: The IIHS evaluation factors not only the straight-ahead seeing distance (as does ours) but also includes evaluation of seeing distance in a curve. Headlights with a wider beam pattern or adaptive (cornering) capability might do better in IIHS' curve tests, bumping up a score. Although we rate width of the light, it is not conducted while driving in a curve.
  • Extra credit: IIHS provides additional credit in its ratings for vehicles equipped with high-beam assist—a feature that automatically switches between low and high beams as conditions warrant. An accompanying study confirms the potential safety benefits of this feature: Results showed that even when people had the opportunity to go to high beams for added visibility, they did so only about 18 percent of the time. Although we don’t award points in our headlight ratings for high-beam assist at present, we also find this feature among our favorites for providing added safety
 

85_Ranger4x4

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It's not the headlights, it's the angle that they are shining. The problem is when the front of the truck is lifted with a "lift kit" and the truck looks like it is sagging in the rear, the angle of the light changes, and is aimed right into the on comers eyes, or some ones rear view mirror. The lights can be as bright as the sun, as long as they point to the road. Also studies have shown that OEM headlights are far from superior to aftermarket lights. Ford and BMW were some of the worst, if I could only remember where I read that.
I don't have to read it, IMO Ford and GM trucks are the worst offenders.

There is more to it than the aim. Patterns and such matter too. Some lights have a lot of splatter going off the pattern too.

I think a lot of the problem with new OEM lights is they have such a sharp cutoff they can have it right to the edge of the limit. Insert weight in rear of vehicle and lights are over the line. Rough road... lots of blinky blinky. Older lights that didn't have the crisp cutoff had to sandbag and be aimed lower and thus were more forgiving with vehicle stance and road conditions.
 

Ranger850

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I don't have to read it, IMO Ford and GM trucks are the worst offenders.

There is more to it than the aim. Patterns and such matter too. Some lights have a lot of splatter going off the pattern too.

I think a lot of the problem with new OEM lights is they have such a sharp cutoff they can have it right to the edge of the limit. Insert weight in rear of vehicle and lights are over the line. Rough road... lots of blinky blinky. Older lights that didn't have the crisp cutoff had to sandbag and be aimed lower and thus were more forgiving with vehicle stance and road conditions.
Maybe a combo of it all, but I rarely get blinded by a sedan or stock 2wd. To me it just makes sense that if you raise the vehicle, in any way, the headlights are lifted too, and adjustments should be required. I don't live in a state that has vehicle inspections, but I would think "headlight aim" is something they should check, but probably do NOT.
 

85_Ranger4x4

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Maybe a combo of it all, but I rarely get blinded by a sedan or stock 2wd. To me it just makes sense that if you raise the vehicle, in any way, the headlights are lifted too, and adjustments should be required. I don't live in a state that has vehicle inspections, but I would think "headlight aim" is something they should check, but probably do NOT.
Everybody has 4x4's around here, in my older 4x4 F-150 meeting a new stock one is still a joke.
 

Bird76Mojo

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I run my 100 watt fog lights 100% of the time, anytime after dusk. The deer here in Illinois move all night long as soon as it gets near dark. On highway, country roads, etc. I just turn them off whenever I'm within 500ft of an oncoming vehicle like the law says. It's saved me from hitting soooooo many deer. My lights are bright enough that they increase your visibility anytime around 30 minutes before dusk and later. Even around dawn, the lights will still make the eyes of deer glow 1/4 mile away.

I've never modded my truck headlights though. Other than replacing them to end up with clear lenses again. I also have my fog lights aimed very well to make sure they don't point directly at the eyes of oncoming drivers. Drivers side points a little closer to the truck and down on the road a little more, and the passenger side is aimed out much further and to the right more.
 
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Bird76Mojo

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OEM manufacturers should have never been forced to get rid of glass headlights by the government in the first place. In my opinion, they're far superior to plastic lenses and the crappy oem headlight quality we get today. My 87 Ranger has some super bright glass headlights. Just amazing on high beam.
 
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