TTB Weirdness?


1986RangerXL

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I will start off saying I have no experience working with suspensions, nor have I owned or driven a 4WD vehicle until I got my Ranger. The issue I'm having is that the body drastically leans when steered one way or the other. (Leans in the direction of the steering.) I know the truck has no sway bars, front or rear. Is this how trucks usually behave with no sway bars? Not real worried about sway bars, but the suspension and axles were upgraded by PO and want to make sure everything is right
 


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There should be no lean.
There is the tech section at the top of every page. Also check the stickies at the top of this forum section.
 

scotts90ranger

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some body roll with no sway bars should be expected during corners at speed, but a lot depends on the front spring setup...
 

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So I took you to mean the when you steered left the truck leaned left, that shouldn't happen. If when you steer left it leans right that is normal. Sway bars counter the turn left lean right scenario.
 

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Mind posting a few photos of these upgrades for us?
 

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So I took you to mean the when you steered left the truck leaned left, that shouldn't happen. If when you steer left it leans right that is normal. Sway bars counter the turn left lean right scenario.
I figured, I just couldn't figure out how that would happen with TTB, something would have to be very strange :)
 

Mechrick

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The older Rangers and Bronco II's have a bunch of caster dialed in the front end. Up to 8 degrees is acceptable at lower ride heights. Half tons are less.

Combine that with wide tires and as you turn the wheel the tendency is to stand the tires on their edges.

Steering Angle Inclination (SAI) causes one side of the truck to stand higher than the other side. Think of SAI as the angle of the line drawn through the upper ball joint and the lower ball joint pivot point when viewed from the front. It usually looks like this / \

Caster is the angle when viewed from the side. It's almost always positive (upper ball joint more rearward). I have seen some trucks that run negative caster, but it's very rare.

Think of caster as a dynamic function. It's measured when turning the front wheels, and it's essentially camber change through an arc. When turning the wheel, caster adds to SAI on one side and subtracts from SAI on the other side. That's what causes the lean.

I've found when installing wide tires on TTB vehicles, they will work better with less caster. Camber and toe need to be set very close to zero to avoid the negative camber when backing up scenario.
 
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ericbphoto

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The older Rangers and Bronco II's have a bunch of caster dialed in the front end. Up to 8 degrees is acceptable at lower ride heights. Half tons are less.

Combine that with wide tires and as you turn the wheel the tendency is to stand the tires on their edges.

Steering Angle Inclination (SAI) causes one side of the truck to stand higher than the other side. Think of SAI as the angle of the line drawn through the upper ball joint and the lower ball joint pivot point when viewed from the front. It usually looks like this / \

Caster is the angle when viewed from the side. It's almost always positive (upper ball joint more rearward). I have seen some trucks that run negative caster, but it's very rare.

Think of caster as a dynamic function. It's measured when turning the front wheels, and it's essentially camber change through an arc. When turning the wheel, caster adds to SAI on one side and subtracts from SAI on the other side. That's what causes the lean.

I've found when installing wide tires on TTB vehicles, they will work better with less caster. Camber and toe need to be set very close to zero to avoid the negative camber when backing up scenario.
Hmmm. That explained what I’ve observed over the years. Thanks
 

1986RangerXL

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Will post pics soon, been busy with work
 
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1986RangerXL

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I have chocked this one up to the missing sway bars instead of a suspension defect. But one more question for you guys, the PO of this truck managed to snap the head off the camber bolt (camber bolt? The bolt that adjust camber/caster and is used for alignment.) Anyway they snapped the head off this bolt, how the hell do I get it out? Been thinking about a torch and hole punch
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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I think you should ask the bolt question in a new thread. More likely to get more views.
 


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