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Towing a ranger

muddobber83

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I need to know if I can tow a 4wd ranger, all four wheels down, on a regular basis. Do I need to look for a certain year, transmission, transfer case, etc? Thanks
 


koda6966

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Invest in a trailer if your towing multiple times. It will be safer and more secure.
 

muddobber83

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I agree on the trailer. I should have been more specific. I am an excavating contractor looking to cut fuel costs. One way would be to pull a small pickup behind a large piece of excavating equipment, usually on back roads for less than 15 miles at a time at speeds less than 20 mph, so that the operator would have a 4wd pickup at his disposal if he needs it. This would eliminate the F-350 4wd diesel and its driver that we usually have follow the equipment operator to new job sites.

I'm just looking at options. Desperate times call for desperate measures. I just knew that people pull vehicles behind RV's all the time and I wondered what was possible.
 

koda6966

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I agree on the trailer. I should have been more specific. I am an excavating contractor looking to cut fuel costs. One way would be to pull a small pickup behind a large piece of excavating equipment, usually on back roads for less than 15 miles at a time at speeds less than 20 mph, so that the operator would have a 4wd pickup at his disposal if he needs it. This would eliminate the F-350 4wd diesel and its driver that we usually have follow the equipment operator to new job sites.

I'm just looking at options. Desperate times call for desperate measures. I just knew that people pull vehicles behind RV's all the time and I wondered what was possible.
That sounds like a good idea, I hope it works out for you but I don't really know much about towing with 4 wheels on the ground.
 

HareRazor

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My biggest concern would be with towing with all the wheels on the ground would be make sure you get a manual transfer case. That way when you are towing it you can put it in neutral and the transmission isn't spinning as if I remember right there is a bearing between the main and input shaft that only gets oiled when the input shaft is spinning.
 

tanbuddy

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Manual 4x4 would be the best bet, if you got a elcectric case, i would disconnect the rear d shaft at the axle, its only 4 12mm bolts.

I just read that your only going short distances at 20 mph, that probablly wouldnt hurt anything. If U really wanted to u could just let the pickup idle behind the machine to make sure the tranny oil got circulated
 
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Will

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You need a manual-shift transfercase and lockouts. You will need to find a 1997 or older Ranger.

The main thing is the manual shift case. Those aren't that common. Any '97 or older Ranger can easily and cheaply be converted to add the lockouts.

If you have the manual-shift and lockouts then you simple put the t-case in neutral and unlock the hubs.
 

muddobber83

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Thanks everyone. You verified pretty much what I was thinking.
 

Destroyer000

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i tow my tough truck.. 88 b2 auto tranny an electric t case.. iam only towing it about 3 miles an i use a tow bar works great for the short distance.
 

AllanD

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You need a Ranger with a MANUAL T-case, the rest is irrelevant.

Proper "flat towing" proceedure with any Ranger with a manual t-case
is to put the t-case in neutral and leave the transmission IN GEAR.

The reason for this is that the T-case has a positive displacement oil pump
built into it and that oil pump is driven by the rear output shaft.

The transmissions depend on splash oil and though SOME parts in the manual transmission spin when being towed in neutral the input shaft and cluster gear only turn with the engine, so spinning the output shaft WITHOUT the engine turning tends to burn up the relatively delicate "pocket bearing" that locates the mainshaft in the input gear.

Automatics? In my opinion they are all equally worthless.

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