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Ticking

Matthewhatt24

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I have a 94 4.0 sohc and I have a tick, but only over probably 20mph and at constant speed when I take my foot off the gas and slow down and when I accelerate the ticking stops no tick at idle either its super super weird and having clue where to start
 


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You sure it's the SOHC? Those weren't standard in Rangers until 2001. The 1994s came with an OHV engine. Also, does the tick have a constant rhythm regardless of how fast you're going, or does its frequency change when you're going faster?
 

dvdswan

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Rock in the tire?
 

Matthewhatt24

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Turns out to be the lifter or rocker or valve not sure yet but my question now is can I get away with just rebuilding the heads or do have to do the whole motor I am on a very tight budget so just the heads would be ideal
 

sgtsandman

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I would look at the lifters first to check for wear and inspect the rockers. If the lifers are worn, you will want to look at the cam shaft to make sure the lobes aren’t worn as well. With a little luck, you might just need to replace the lifters and be good.
 

rhekman

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I would look at the lifters first to check for wear and inspect the rockers. If the lifers are worn, you will want to look at the cam shaft to make sure the lobes aren’t worn as well. With a little luck, you might just need to replace the lifters and be good.
Worn roller lifters in a 4.0 OHV are pretty unlikely. Odds are the hydraulic internals are gummed up. Plus rocker arms and pushrods are like $4-5 for a set of four, while lifters are $30-40 a piece.

The question is, what kind of budget are we talking about here? Parts? Labor? Time?

To the original question, if the motor is just ticking excessively, but othewise running fine, then it can be refreshed, possibly without even head work.

1. Check serp belt accessory drive for bad components.
2. Check for exhaust leaks.
3. Use a mechanic stethoscope to probe surfaces around the running engine.
4. Test compression.

If everything checks out but there is distinct valve train noise, then the top end of the motor can be removed in the truck. Plan on replacing upper/lower intake gaskets and possibly head gaskets for sure. Then from there replace rocker arms, pushrods, or lifters as needed.
- Remove upper intake & attached lines & linkages
- Remove lower intake & fuel rail
- Remove valve covers
- Remove rocker shaft and look for worn rocker arm cups & tips, and worn pushrod ends
- With the rocker shaft removed and a pushrod in the head, try pushing into the lifter. The internal plunger should move up and down with spring pressure at least .050"
- If stuck, then the heads should be removed (exhaust manifolds attached) to get the lifters out.
- The lifters can be cleaned with solvent, needle nose pliers, and compressed air. There are videos on Youtube showing how.
 

sgtsandman

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Worn roller lifters in a 4.0 OHV are pretty unlikely. Odds are the hydraulic internals are gummed up. Plus rocker arms and pushrods are like $4-5 for a set of four, while lifters are $30-40 a piece.

The question is, what kind of budget are we talking about here? Parts? Labor? Time?

To the original question, if the motor is just ticking excessively, but othewise running fine, then it can be refreshed, possibly without even head work.

1. Check serp belt accessory drive for bad components.
2. Check for exhaust leaks.
3. Use a mechanic stethoscope to probe surfaces around the running engine.
4. Test compression.

If everything checks out but there is distinct valve train noise, then the top end of the motor can be removed in the truck. Plan on replacing upper/lower intake gaskets and possibly head gaskets for sure. Then from there replace rocker arms, pushrods, or lifters as needed.
- Remove upper intake & attached lines & linkages
- Remove lower intake & fuel rail
- Remove valve covers
- Remove rocker shaft and look for worn rocker arm cups & tips, and worn pushrod ends
- With the rocker shaft removed and a pushrod in the head, try pushing into the lifter. The internal plunger should move up and down with spring pressure at least .050"
- If stuck, then the heads should be removed (exhaust manifolds attached) to get the lifters out.
- The lifters can be cleaned with solvent, needle nose pliers, and compressed air. There are videos on Youtube showing how.
If I remember correctly, the 4.0 OHV doesn’t have roller lifters or roller rockers. I’ve never owned or worked on one, so I may be totally wrong on one or both.

I do know that the 2.9, which the 4.0 OHV is based on, doesn’t have roller lifters. I’m pretty sure it doesn’t have roller rockers. So, like above, I could be wrong on the rockers.
 

rhekman

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4WD
Total Lift
2"
If I remember correctly, the 4.0 OHV doesn’t have roller lifters or roller rockers. I’ve never owned or worked on one, so I may be totally wrong on one or both.

I do know that the 2.9, which the 4.0 OHV is based on, doesn’t have roller lifters. I’m pretty sure it doesn’t have roller rockers. So, like above, I could be wrong on the rockers.
I speak from experience, the 4.0 OHV has hydraulic roller lifters, solid ball-end pushrods, and shaft mounted rockers with non-roller tips.
The oiling system did not change drastically from the 2.9. Oil flows from the cam shaft to additional oil galleys that pressurize the lifters, then through the heads up to the rock shaft towers, which feed the journals of each rocker arm. There are two holes in the rocker arm - one to the pushrod cup, and an open hole that bleeds the journal and is meant to provide splash oiling to the valve tip.


Here's a picture of the lifter. Note the roller end, and the socket under the plastic cup. The cup snaps in and secures the internal plungers & springs.

The main issues with the 4.0 valvetrain are the tiny oil passages in the hydraulic lifters, and the long path it takes for oil to get to the valve tips. Two tiny opposing spring loaded plungers inside the lifter provide the preload to control valve-lash on startup. Pressurized oil then adds to that pressure to limit play in the valvetrain. If the lifter becomes plugged or seized internally, then you get either excessive valve lash or excessive load at the rocker tip. The result: telltale ticking in your engine bay, and eventually wiped rocker arms and flattened pushrod tips.
 

sgtsandman

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Location
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Vehicle Year
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Make / Model
Ford Ranger XLT
Engine Type
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Engine Size
4.0 SOHC
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Total Lift
Pre-2008 lift
Tire Size
31X10.5R15
I speak from experience, the 4.0 OHV has hydraulic roller lifters, solid ball-end pushrods, and shaft mounted rockers with non-roller tips.
The oiling system did not change drastically from the 2.9. Oil flows from the cam shaft to additional oil galleys that pressurize the lifters, then through the heads up to the rock shaft towers, which feed the journals of each rocker arm. There are two holes in the rocker arm - one to the pushrod cup, and an open hole that bleeds the journal and is meant to provide splash oiling to the valve tip.


Here's a picture of the lifter. Note the roller end, and the socket under the plastic cup. The cup snaps in and secures the internal plungers & springs.

The main issues with the 4.0 valvetrain are the tiny oil passages in the hydraulic lifters, and the long path it takes for oil to get to the valve tips. Two tiny opposing spring loaded plungers inside the lifter provide the preload to control valve-lash on startup. Pressurized oil then adds to that pressure to limit play in the valvetrain. If the lifter becomes plugged or seized internally, then you get either excessive valve lash or excessive load at the rocker tip. The result: telltale ticking in your engine bay, and eventually wiped rocker arms and flattened pushrod tips.
I stand corrected and realize that I was using the wrong term for the push rods. Thank you for the correction and hopefully this helps out the OP.
 

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