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Swap Dana 28 E4wd to 2001 Ranger Edge 4X4


Blown

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:annoyed: I screwed-up. I took down the rear drive shaft and found it was too short. When I measured I did not have the slip shaft fully seated, it will go all the way to the base of the slip yoke. It was barely past the inner bushing and looked like another 1.5" would slip in still leaving a 0.5" slip. I swear I had it seated when I measured.............................$100 mistake.:idiot:
My drive shaft shop will retube it, it's the only way. though we tried stretching it. They are only charging me labor as they can reuse the tube. This should take care of the vibe.
 


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JoshT

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That's why, when I get my little V8 truck running, I'm rolling it onto a trailer and taking whole thing to driveshaft shop. I've got a shaft with the right ends, let them measure and cut.

Hopefully it fixes the vibe.
 
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Blown

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The vibration is gone! Duh, fricken slip shaft and shrinking driveshaft got stretched to the proper length and now work great.:icon_twisted:

I'm done, but will post-up if I have any issues with this swap.:beer:
 

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That's why, when I get my little V8 truck running, I'm rolling it onto a trailer and taking whole thing to driveshaft shop. I've got a shaft with the right ends, let them measure and cut.

Hopefully it fixes the vibe.

i have seen that go bad before, and then they did not offer anything for damages. and getting the typical exhaust shop to build what you want in specificity is often an exercise in futility. but it is usually the best option for expediency.



blown, does your trans have the boss for the strut rod, or did you leave it off?

dont remember if you mentioned that...maybe i should go review again.


the stock application has a strut rod from the side of the front output of the case to the trans bell. your trans may have the boss on it, probably not threaded though. there were some units in a yard a month or so ago that may have them in place still if you want me to check. your beyond stock powerlevels so it may be of benefit.

glad to hear the vibe situation is solved:icon_thumby: get some studded tires and go ice racin on the lake now!
 

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This is the third set of shafts I have had made. The weight need to be on the vehicle so the suspension is compressed to normal ride height. The measure ujoint center to u-joint center. I just screwed-up.

I been to the lake George Ice racing, while fun to try, I wouldn't stand a chance for the Power those guys run, fun thought though.

Thanks for the replies and keeping up with my follies.

NO strut, I'l check for a boss, this is a healthy 4.0 with 6.5lbs of boost but it is at mile high in Denver area and not all that powerful, probably a bit more than a stock 4.0 at seal level, but not that much.
 

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I am back for two reasons:
I will wire it and let you all know how that works.

Secondly, I got lucky with driveshaft angles. The T-case is longer which would increase the angle at the T-case output driveshaft connection. However, I had lowered my rig which corrected the angles. The output of the T-case and input of the differential should be parallel or at least within 1 degree of each other in order for the u-joint to cancel out vibration. You can place a wedge under the rear axle and/or shim-up the transmission cross member mount to get the angle right. Lack of alignment will cause vibration and wear. There are plenty of good articles on the web to get it right.
 

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Good stuff! But those shafts are more complex than our single shaft with a u-joint at each end.

U-joint operating angles are generally the most common cause of driveline vibration in vehicles that have been reworked. When reworking a chassis or installing a new driveshaft in a vehicle there are basic rules that apply to U-joint operating angles that you should follow.

Number-1: U-joint operating angles at each end of the shaft should always be at least 1-degree.

Number-2: If you are to achieve cancellation these U-joint operating angles on each end of a driveshaft should always be equal (within 1-degree), but opposite of each other.

Number-3: U-joint operating angles should not be larger than 3-degrees. If they are, make sure that they do not exceed the maximum recommended angles.

To set up the driveline you need to establish the angles for the transmission output shaft, rear end pinion shaft and driveshaft. A good tool for measuring these angles is an inclinometer. They can be obtained quite inexpensively from a local parts store or tool supplier.

First measure the transmission output shaft angle. It should be pointing downward to the rear with the vehicle sitting at ride height on a level surface. At least 1-degree and ideally not more than 3-degrees down. You can alter the transmission angle by inserting or removing shims under the rear transmission mount.

Next step is to measure the rear end pinion shaft angle. It should be pointing upward towards the front with the vehicle sitting at ride height on a level surface. At least 1-degree and ideally not more than 3-degrees up. You can alter the rear end pinion shaft angle by inserting or removing wedge shaped shims under the rear spring mounts.
Finally measure the driveshaft angle to confirm that it is at least 1-degree down from the transmission output shaft angle and at least 1-degree up from the rear end pinion shaft angle. Achieving these angles in relation to each other will cancel out the vibration.
Checking to see if you have got it correct:
If there is no vibration under normal operating conditions then the angles are correct.
If there is vibration under acceleration, you need to add more downward pinion angle preload. If the opposite occurs, the vibrations tends to decrease or disappear under acceleration, you need to reduce the downward angle preload.
If the vibration steadily increases with driveshaft speed (either accelerating or decelerating) the symptom is primarily the result of a driveshaft imbalance or yoke runout. Sometimes this yoke runout problem can be improved by rotating the U-joint 180-degrees in the rear end differential yoke.
 
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Blown

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I said I would get this pic. The Dana 28 does not come down as low as the stock case. The catalytic converter is lower now.
 
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Blown

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I have seen a .5 mpg loss with this change, not bad. It was already spinning the driveshaft and axles, now it pushing the wheels too.

I finally got it up to 80+ mph and the front start vibing, gonna check that driveshaft angle, I bet a double cardon joint would solve that issue........

It is awesome to have taken all the weight out of the bed, including the tailgate and be able to stomp on it off the line with no wheel spin!!! The only way I can get it loose is on snow, ice, and probably loose dirt/gravel roads.

I have not wired it yet, better get to it before I do something stupid and get it stuck.
 

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I found info that says the torque split on the Dana 28 is 1/3rd Front, 2/3rd rear. Because of that split, the front will pull on a slippery surface while the rear spins if you hit even 1/3 throttle. I get much rear wheel spin with a little skinny pedal and the front just pulls you along slowly without spin, too slow for me and likely not enough to get up a slippery hill.

I am going to wire it finally for 4X4 and look forward to trying it out soon with the hopes of early mountain snow.
 
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Blown

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Merry Christmas!

I finally got to this, wired the T-Case for 4 wheel drive! Ya Hot Wired and controlled by the driver, not the Dana28 ECM and the sensors are not wired.

I read through this again: "Theory of Operation"
"Power is transmitted through the transmission into the transfer case and passes through the planet, allowing torque to be split between the front and rear axle." I hit the switch that turns the electromagnetic clutch on. "The planetary then locks, and splits the power 50/50 to the front and rear axles. The ECM keeps the clutch engaged for about three and a half seconds; and then turns it off. If the wheel slip is still occurring, the ECM will re-engage the clutch after about a half second and will continue to cycle the clutch on and off until the wheel slip is gone. The ECM is programmed so that the clutch won't be engaged if the transmission is in park or neutral, or if the brakes are applied and road speed is over 5 mph."

OK important parts highlighted in orange = short engagement time is followed by short release to allow differential action/release binding. It is normally not engaged over 5mph.

After reading the above and thinking about a possible high speed lock-up, and damaging something, I am the ECM controller so.................I decided to use a protected switch so you cannot flip it on accidentally. I am not sure if the clutch would hold-up to a high speed engagement and there is no need for it at speed with AWD.
I am able to flip the switch, which engages the clutch, which eliminates the transfer case differential action and given the 50/50 4WD to get out of slippery or sticky situations under 5mph.
 
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alwaysFlOoReD

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I'm looking forward to your impressions re; cornering.

Sent from my XT1032 using Tapatalk
 

Blown

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I'm looking forward to your impressions re; cornering.

Sent from my XT1032 using Tapatalk
I added much to my post after you posted. There has not been enough snow to check it out yet. It should corner like any other 4WD Ranger when I have the clutch engaged and is only to be used for low traction or it will bind the axles and driveshafts. It's not for dry traction and faster cornering, that is where the AWD shines.

I know it is locking by the bind I can get with a slight turn rolling down the driveway slowly. The bind will stop the truck, I flip the switch to release the clutch, pop, away goes the bind and the truck rolls.:icon_thumby:
 
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