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Seized motor, removing torque convertor


Dubis

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So i need to take out my motor and I'm thinking of just pulling the engine with the torque convertor connected, would it be hard to retattach the torque convertor to the transmission? and should i support the motor with a crane and completely remove the motor mounts or can i jack the motor over the threads of the mounts with the transmission attatched?
 


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willy

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You will be fine with it attached its gonna make a wonderful mess though
 

RayInStl

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Just make sure you take the torque converter off of the engine and seat it in the transmission before reinstalling the motor. Torque converters must be seated properly in the transmission or you'll break the pump when you tighten the trans to engine bolts. Ask me how I know... :annoyed:
 

Dubis

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Just make sure you take the torque converter off of the engine and seat it in the transmission before reinstalling the motor. Torque converters must be seated properly in the transmission or you'll break the pump when you tighten the trans to engine bolts. Ask me how I know... :annoyed:
And is there any advice to doing that or do you think just a bit of research would do? because youtube and other info sites have gotten me this far
 

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I too have FUBARed an automatic trans front pump by not doing this, and yes it only takes one time to learn this lesson, and the cost of a full rebuild or another trans, lol.

Torque converter has splines and tabs.
You install it on the input shaft and push it in it will stop
Then rotate the torque converter while pushing in on it, you don't have to push hard.
You will feel torque converter slide in more and usually a "click" noise
Keep rotating it there will be 2 or 3 "lock ins"
If it is in all the way then you can put a straight edge across the bell housing and not touch the torque converter.

When installing trans to engine you will know it is installed correctly if bell housing mates flush with engine and then torque converter needs to be slid towards flexplate to be bolted into place.
If you have to use the bolts to force bell housing to mate with engine then you WILL wreck the transmission.
 
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Just a few other notes to add to what has been said.

1: As stated, this is extremely easy to do but will make an incredible mess. It can be made a bit easier, and the mess mitigated by taking the trans out first. It is easier to get a drain pan under the bell and catch more fluid if the trans is taken down first because most of the leakage will come from the converter.

2: Plan on needing to replace the converter hub seal. This way of doing things has a higher than usual chance of damaging the seal. It should be replaced anyway.

3: In addition to what Ron said about determining converter seating, on some transmissions (namely the FRN5) it is possible to have the converter not be seated fully but still have the trans case come up flush to the engine. Once everything is together and the first two bolts on the bell are tightened try rocking the converter by jiggling a stud. If it moves easily and goes "ding" against the flex plate it is in properly.

Also, on the 4R and 5R series transmissions with the removable bell housing when the converter is seated properly you can hear it rubbing on the on the bolts at the rear of the bell. This is a good sign and shouldn't be cause for concern. The converter will be drawn far enough away from the bolts once the converter nuts are tightened.
 


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