Road Noise


raycebickel

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That is correct sir. After the initial torque you back it off, very critical not to at all move anything that will upset its position, then you can almost finger tight it. Remember to move it forward to next lock position.
Are you certain the bearing grease is the proper type?
It must be high temp lithium
I did not use high temp lithium. I used black bearing grease. Like more of a general use type stuff
 


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PetroleumJunkie412

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If its something like CRC's MolyGraph, that will cause bearing failure within 1,500 miles. Had it happen to me.
 

4x4junkie

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Yeah I too seem to recall black or dark gray moly type greases being only for CV joints and slip fittings (slip spline on the right-side TTB axle shaft for example). The moly particles can erode the surfaces of roller & ball bearings.

My suggestion would be to start disassembling and inspecting things, starting at the driver side. If the bearings are damaged, I would suggest starting over again with new bearings & races, and use the correct grease. Also get yourself the proper bearing nut socket so you can do the correct initial seating procedure for the bearings (torque to 35 ft-lbs while spinning rotor back & forth, then back off and retighten to 15 inch-lbs).

Rockauto.com sells the Timken SET-37 bearing sets for approx $10 each + shipping.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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Only thing I've had no issues to date with is Certified Labs Xtreme grease. I use it on my fleet trucks as its designed for the worst the oilfield can throw at moving parts.

So far, so good. Has a high cadmium, moly, and zinc content, and an absurdly high temperature rating.
 

Josh B

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I did not use high temp lithium. I used black bearing grease. Like more of a general use type stuff
Right, I wasn't thinking about it changed to disc type in 93
 

4x4junkie

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I've used a few different greases over the years w/o issue (Castrol Wheel Bearing Grease, Peak Hi-Temp Red Grease, Sta-Lube Hi-Temp Disc Brake Wheel Bearing Grease, and a few others... Valvoline too I think). The one thing they all have had in common is they are NLGI-2 lithium or lithium complex-based.
 

Josh B

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Hoped you might have had it resolved by now. There was more to the grease type and the caliper lube than I mentioned.

Mine actually had the same problem for years, left turn silent, right turn loud. Drove it at 55 for several years due to this because beyond that it got louder. Mine even included an added benefit of pulling to the right.
I won't even include the problems of my own making which came along with learning the system and extreme ADHD, but it all came down to proper bearing grease and caliper lube.
I do not believe improper bearing torque played that large a part in it, as I tore it down time after time, mostly on the right, and did not realize success until all three factors were in place, torque, grease, and caliper lube.

I had gone through an entire can of wheel bearing grease, told the kid at Napa what I needed and he handed me one off the shelf, even though I had looked at the book and told him what it had called for, he said something like "that's what everybody uses on those" so I took it, used it up before I'd figured it all out.

Tore those assemblies apart so many times I can't remember, but the last time, the time when it all came together I had all the necessary ingredients together and well knew how to use them. I'd recently gone to auto parts place and asked for the proper grease(in my case, what the book calls for that model, high temp lithium) but he was having probs locating anything as I kept reminding him the lithium high temp, then saw some higher up and looked at the label, there it was.

I'd also been around the block a few times with the caliper lube and had gotten away from the counter packs and gotten the shop size from off the shelf.

Put it all back together with proper grease, caliper lube on the verge of excessive(but Not sloppy) and torqued with the greatest of care.

The caliper lube got put liberally on anything in the caliper-brake pad-slider/bolt areas where metal touches metal.

And for torquing I simply used my old stand-by's, not really sure which one of these it was but either will do the job if one can grasp the idea of what 35 lbs would be at a foot's distance :)
One is an old Air force tool and the other a large slip-joint pliers
 

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