Pros/Cons of 3.0 Vulcan V6


Ranger_XL

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Power/Durability/Reliability/Costs of Maintenance
 


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racsan

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ford
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well they are a reliable, long lasting motor, the 2 biggest issues I know of are the cam syncronizer (where the distributor was) . If its chirping, its on its way out. And the fact that they seem underpowered. This engine needs to be wound up, it makes its power pretty high in the rpm band and most of the time the differential gearing wont let it be running where it needs to be at. Id recommend 4.10’s minuimum, and thats with stock size tires.With the right gearing its not too bad. Id guess the maintenance/ upkeep costs are about the same as any other ranger engine. change the oil, plugs/ wires when needed and keep rolling down the road. the 2.3 is better on fuel and a 4.0 makes more power but a 3.0 isnt a bad engine.
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ericbphoto

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1993
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3.0 V6
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3.0L
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Manual
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6"
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35"
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Dirtman

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466.63 teaspoons.
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So friggin big!
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ericbphoto

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19Walt93

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It's a good engine for a light weight passenger car or a 2wd pickup with 4.10 gears that's going to be used as a car by someone who lives in flat country. I don't know where Wind Gap is but I consider most of Pa to be flat, at least relative to NH & Vt.
 

lil_Blue_Ford

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My first Ranger was a 3.0 with a manual and 3.73 gears. It did pretty good like that, seemed to have adequate power and when I needed it to scoot, I ran the RPMs up. It was also a 2wd. Been thinking of resurrecting it as a run-around toy or something, it got wrapped around a tree like 10-12 years ago.
 

Ranger_XL

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Walt, Wind Gap, Pennsylvania is a valley located at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, known as the Lehigh Valley. A 3.0 Vulcan V6 would manage fine in Wind Gap's elevation, albeit RWD could be problematic without winter tires and weight in the bed. I have been contemplating putting money into my existing trucks (2003 F-250 SD SC XL with a 6.8 V10 mated to a ZF6 and 4x4 and 1996 Ranger RC XL with a 2.3 I4 mated to an M5OD and 4x4), enjoying them 9-1/2 months per year, and driving a plastic-clad vehicle (Aveo, Spark, Sonic, etc. with a manual) in the winter when the roads are laden with rock salt. I frankly do not want to expel time, effort, and money only to watch the tire wells and undercarriage areas rust again. Lil Blue, do you still have your 3.0 Ranger?
 

Bgunner

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Proper Gearing for a 3.0 is a must. I have 3.45's in my 3.0 ranger and while highway I get great gas mileage running between 2500 and 2700 rpm @ 65mph this also is under the power range of this motor. I live in a valley surrounded by mountains and constantly am shifting between gears to be able to pull them. A real pain so 4.10's are a good starting point in areas like ours.

Reliability of the 3.0s is high as long as you do your maintenance as you should. Cost of repairs is about average and cheaper in some areas but doesnt break the bank like Audi, VW, BMW ect. does in most cases.
 

G8orFord

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Pro: it's 0.1 liter larger than a 2.9
Con: it's 1.0 liter smaller than a 4.0
 

8thTon

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For a lighter Ranger with 4.10's it would do fine in Wind Gap. Also depends on what year, as the 2004 like mine is 154hp. If you've got an extended cab and 4WD and the weight is getting up there it will of course get slower - my 2WD goes quite well. When I had 300lbs in the back for winter traction it was noticeable, but hardly a problem.
 

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Walt, Wind Gap, Pennsylvania is a valley located at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, known as the Lehigh Valley. A 3.0 Vulcan V6 would manage fine in Wind Gap's elevation, albeit RWD could be problematic without winter tires and weight in the bed. I have been contemplating putting money into my existing trucks (2003 F-250 SD SC XL with a 6.8 V10 mated to a ZF6 and 4x4 and 1996 Ranger RC XL with a 2.3 I4 mated to an M5OD and 4x4), enjoying them 9-1/2 months per year, and driving a plastic-clad vehicle (Aveo, Spark, Sonic, etc. with a manual) in the winter when the roads are laden with rock salt. I frankly do not want to expel time, effort, and money only to watch the tire wells and undercarriage areas rust again. Lil Blue, do you still have your 3.0 Ranger?
I do still have it. Front clip is off of it and I have been too busy with other things to get back to it. Three-ish years ago I had to have hip surgery so I needed an automatic. Now I can drive a manual again, but...
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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Walt, Wind Gap, Pennsylvania is a valley located at the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, known as the Lehigh Valley. A 3.0 Vulcan V6 would manage fine in Wind Gap's elevation, albeit RWD could be problematic without winter tires and weight in the bed. I have been contemplating putting money into my existing trucks (2003 F-250 SD SC XL with a 6.8 V10 mated to a ZF6 and 4x4 and 1996 Ranger RC XL with a 2.3 I4 mated to an M5OD and 4x4), enjoying them 9-1/2 months per year, and driving a plastic-clad vehicle (Aveo, Spark, Sonic, etc. with a manual) in the winter when the roads are laden with rock salt. I frankly do not want to expel time, effort, and money only to watch the tire wells and undercarriage areas rust again. Lil Blue, do you still have your 3.0 Ranger?
You don't live far from me. There's a few of us on here in Pittsburgh.

3.0 is... Well. It's a taurus engine. What you see is what you get.

Agree with others. Go to UPAP in Pittsburgh, get a 8.8 limited slip with 4.10s for $75-125, carry a small tool kit and a few sensors under the the seat, and circumnavigate the globe a few times.


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Con: it's 0.1l away from greatness
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ericbphoto

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Location
Wellford, SC
Vehicle Year
1993
Make / Model
Ford Ranger
Engine Type
3.0 V6
Engine Size
3.0L
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Total Lift
6"
Tire Size
35"
My credo
In theory, theory and practice are the same. In practice, they are different.


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