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Please elaborate on what you use to prevent seized brake drum

scotts90ranger

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I originally swapped a drum Explorer 8.8 into my '90 Ranger for ease since it's fairly simple and I'd never had issues with them in the other couple axles I've had in the ol Ranger (between everything it'd had 3 different 7.5's in it, two with the same brake components...). When I put the 8.8 in it worked fine most of the time but I'd also put in a lunchbox locker, every now and then the drums would stick and I would be driving normal and come to a stop light with the rear end locked up and squealing the tires sliding sideways... That got old so I bought a junkyard axle with discs to just use the brakes (I made $20 converting to rear discs after selling the other axle...). In my climate the rear discs work great and I have no complaint. The parking brake on the other hand in the discs COMPLETELY BLOWS, if I'm in the sand out wheeling and in low range I can set it and drive off (manual trans with a turbo 2.3L so no bottom end...) barely noticing... My Explorers (two V8 explorers...) don't care if the parking brake is set either, I've tried several adjustments and they are "just enough".

That said, I'm not in the rust belt, so I have little issues with anything rust related...

To get back on topic, if you clean up the axle flange then put some grease or antiseize on the axle flange where the drum aligns that might help but there's nothing really to help the step behind the shoe contact area.
 


Paisano

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Scott,

Your exprerience with your lunch box locker and your junkyard axle disc brakes, was.......well...........kind of harrowing. On Saturday morning, I am going to make a little adjustment to my new 8.8 axle drum brakes. At that time, I will apply a little anti-seize lubricant on the axle flange.

Racan's work-around is kind of intriguing
 
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scotts90ranger

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I never did figure out what was going on with those drums, but I didn't spend much time investigating either... was probably just tighter on one side than the other or something, I never did have the parking brake hooked up at that point. If you at some point do decide to go disc brake on an Explorer 8.8 it's an easy swap, pull the axle shafts, pull the backing plates, grab two passenger side brake hoses that go to the caliper from the junkyard, grab the crossover hard line, go to an auto parts place and grab two brake line nuts (or grab some from your original axle) then cut the hard line where the center drop line meets them and flare the lines to meet that, pretty clean and easy...

I'm sure you'll be fine with drums
 

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I never could find that video, its not on this phone, didnt put it on my youtube and Ive searched here and cant find it-and Im sure I had posted it on trs, been over 5 years as it was the green ‘93 4wd I think. Maybe I can find time to make another one, Im not sure if I had done this to my current truck.
 

Paisano

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I would be curious to look at that, Rascan. But no rush
 

Paisano

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Scott, I'm going to message you directly with a couple questions if that is ok.
 

Jameswest1991

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I originally swapped a drum Explorer 8.8 into my '90 Ranger for ease since it's fairly simple and I'd never had issues with them in the other couple axles I've had in the ol Ranger (between everything it'd had 3 different 7.5's in it, two with the same brake components...). When I put the 8.8 in it worked fine most of the time but I'd also put in a lunchbox locker, every now and then the drums would stick and I would be driving normal and come to a stop light with the rear end locked up and squealing the tires sliding sideways... That got old so I bought a junkyard axle with discs to just use the brakes (I made $20 converting to rear discs after selling the other axle...). In my climate the rear discs work great and I have no complaint. The parking brake on the other hand in the discs COMPLETELY BLOWS, if I'm in the sand out wheeling and in low range I can set it and drive off (manual trans with a turbo 2.3L so no bottom end...) barely noticing... My Explorers (two V8 explorers...) don't care if the parking brake is set either, I've tried several adjustments and they are "just enough".

That said, I'm not in the rust belt, so I have little issues with anything rust related...

To get back on topic, if you clean up the axle flange then put some grease or antiseize on the axle flange where the drum aligns that might help but there's nothing really to help the step behind the shoe contact area.
I did an 8.8 swap on my 91 but haven’t hooked up the parking brake. Does your parking brake hold on a bill? If so that’s what counts right?
 

Jameswest1991

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In a recent discussion, I described the problem of having a stuck brake drum. I had to pound it off.

A couple of you were saying you use a lubricant to prevent seized brake drums. Can you be more specific on exactly where you apply the lubricant on what lubricant you use?
Disc brake swap /axle swap with disc brakes
 

scotts90ranger

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If I shut the engine off and leave it in gear as well as use the parking brake yeah, but I have a habit of not parking on hills...
 

Eddo Rogue

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Its the star adjuster that bones you, because you need to back it off to clear the deeper ridge of the worn drum. I like to clean the threads nice with a wire wheel or something, then use a lubricant on the threads that won't gum up with dust, and is ideally waterproof. I like to practice pushing the lock and backing off the star adjuster from the backing plate slot beforehand with the drum to get a better visual of what to do so its not a PITA.
 

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Its the star adjuster that bones you, because you need to back it off to clear the deeper ridge of the worn drum. I like to clean the threads nice with a wire wheel or something, then use a lubricant on the threads that won't gum up with dust, and is ideally waterproof. I like to practice pushing the lock and backing off the star adjuster from the backing plate slot beforehand with the drum to get a better visual of what to do so its not a PITA.
That is really good advice... practice while you can see things. I'll add that most times you have to use two tools to "dejust" the brake shoes. A small pocket driver to push the lever away from the star wheel... then a brake spoon to turn the wheel.
 

Paisano

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Honestly, I would rather adjust the star wheel through the front with the drum off...........to avoid adjusting it through that little rear backing plate slot. I'll probably start doing that and see how it works out. The drawback in doing this is that it might require me to back off the adjuster a little too much to ensure that I can easily remove the drum. Then the wheel cylinder pistons would have to extend more which I hear would wear it out faster.
I also noticed the last two times I overhauled with new drum brake hardware, I had to file down and bend the tang on the adjuster lever so that it would grab onto the toothed notch of the star wheel.

Hopefully, I will convert to rear disc brakes in a few years and be done with drum brakes for good
 
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Uncle Gump

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Honestly @Paisano I simply believe you're over thinking.

If you did the brake job correct... these brakes self adjust. Get a good roll in reverse and pump the brakes a couple solid times. Repeat a couple times. The rear brakes are adjusted. Some will say to apply the park brake several times and it does the same thing. I've done it my way for about 40 years... it works... I'll keep doing it my way.

I'm also thinking if you had to bend and file the self adjusting lever... you had the wrong part or your technique for installing it is bending it... I've never had to file one.
 

ekrampitzjr

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Honestly @Paisano I simply believe you're over thinking.

If you did the brake job correct... these brakes self adjust. Get a good roll in reverse and pump the brakes a couple solid times. Repeat a couple times. The rear brakes are adjusted. Some will say to apply the park brake several times and it does the same thing. I've done it my way for about 40 years... it works... I'll keep doing it my way.

I'm also thinking if you had to bend and file the self adjusting lever... you had the wrong part or your technique for installing it is bending it... I've never had to file one.
I've always heard your way was the proper way to self-adjust rear drum brakes (pump brakes while moving in reverse).
 

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That is really good advice... practice while you can see things. I'll add that most times you have to use two tools to "dejust" the brake shoes. A small pocket driver to push the lever away from the star wheel... then a brake spoon to turn the wheel.
You have described my version of hell. I am usually turning the wrong way at first, then realize when it gets tight that I goofed. Then spend more time than necessary upset at the truck and my stupidity. Then I turn it the right way for what feels like an eternity, and get the drums off.

I usually use a bit of the copper anti seize for the hub center on a little flux brush (harbor freight sells a pack of 30 for like 5 bucks). I've managed to not get it all over after years of practice. Also use a little on the axle studs to make the lug nuts go on just a little easier.
 

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