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Oil pump recommendations


Nez'sRanger

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Hey guys! I'm about to change the oil pan gasket in my truck, and I figured, might as well replace the 30 year old (and probably caked up with crap) oil pump.
I caught a few quick mentions of guys using higher volume/pressure pumps in a 2.9, but I haven't been able to find them again to double check.
What are your recommendations? Is it that beneficial to use a high volume/pressure pump, or will a new stock pump be more than sufficient?
Thanks!
 


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alwaysFlOoReD

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Stock pump is fine. Hi-volume/hi-pressure pumps just eat up horsepower in a stock engine.
 

88workcar

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Stock pump lasted 30 yrs, why would you not go back with a stock? Where will we all be in 30 more years lol.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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If you do wind up going with the high output one, let me know. I thought about getting one when it's time to replace mine.
 

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as long as your bearings are good the stock replacement pump should be enough pressure. ive always wondered though about the possibility of pumping all the oil up top and the pump drawing air before enough oil could drain back into the pan. Im not sure that’s possible, but it’s something I had thought about. I believe racing engines that run a high volume pump have a bigger pan for more oil capacity. A new stock pump is certainly going to be better over one with alot of hours on it.
 

Nez'sRanger

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Thanks guys! I went with the standard volume (an aftermarket Melling). Once I find a way to jack it up and pull the pan, ill see how it does (I got the 4x4, so it'll be a pain!).
 

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Please let us know how it goes. I've done an '88 2WD 4 cylinder by lifting the engine enough to put a 4x4 on each side where the motor mounts are, and there was barely enough room to change the pump. But I've been told that it can't be done with a 2.9 4WD without pulling the engine.
 

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I have a little different view I suppose...

I would have went with a higher volume pump... Melling most likely. I mean it would depend on what my oil pressure was before... but with 30 years and xxx mileage... there is wear. If the engine started up cold at the pressure relief value and maintained 18-20 psi on a hot idle... I would just do a stock pump. South of that and I'm doing a high volume pump... despite the 20% greater horse power loss over a stock pump.

I just think having 20% more potential in volume on my oil pump can't be a bad thing on a well used 30 year old engine. With the upper end lubrication issues the 2.9 has... just seems like a no brainer... for me at least.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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I have a little different view I suppose...

I would have went with a higher volume pump... Melling most likely. I mean it would depend on what my oil pressure was before... but with 30 years and xxx mileage... there is wear. If the engine started up cold at the pressure relief value and maintained 18-20 psi on a hot idle... I would just do a stock pump. South of that and I'm doing a high volume pump... despite the 20% greater horse power loss over a stock pump.

I just think having 20% more potential in volume on my oil pump can't be a bad thing on a well used 30 year old engine. With the upper end lubrication issues the 2.9 has... just seems like a no brainer... for me at least.
My thoughts exactly. 2.9s are known for oil pressure issues, so feed it ALL THE OIL.
 

RobbieD

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Any new consenus here, stock or high-volume oil pump?

Background. The other day I suddenly lost pressure on my (stock) '90 B2 2WD. Truck has a stock working dash "gauge" and an added mechanical pressure gauge. With some revs the mech gauge would show a few pounds. Motor ticked a little, did not overheat (not even close). It happened about a mile from house, so I limped it on home.

After a change of the oil (10W30, was 5W30) and filter (Motorcraft FL1A), now at idle the mech gauge shows 5~10 lbs, dash gauge needle is up (@ 1/3). BUT, when I rev the motor, dash needle drops out (no pressure) and mech gauge lowers to just a couple of pounds.

Prior to this the engine has not had any issues. Good runner, no smoke, very little oil consumption and actually quiet (wasn't a typical 2.9 "ticker"). Pressure at idle prior to this episode was about 60 psi at startup, then down to 10 to 15 at idle after reaching running temps.

Next step, I'll have to pull the pan and see what I got. And I might as well plan ahead on a new pump. I'll do either the Melling M-128 or M-328, a new pickup and a new pump shaft.

Sooooooo . . . stock or high volume?
 

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I'll stick with what I said in this post originally... High volume.
 

Nez'sRanger

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I'll stick with what I said in this post originally... High volume.
Yeah, what Uncle said. While I went with the melling stock replacement, it never really fixed the ticking, so I do wish I put the high pressure pump in, just to see.
I also did the roller rocker mod, and it didn't fix it either. I've heard rumors that it is a bottom end issue that results in the ticking, and while I'm not experienced enough to know for sure, I've got a feeling something on the bottom is behind the ticking. Maybe the high pressure pump will make up for whatever gunks up the oil feed? Let us know how it goes!

At this point, my current engine is what it is... A ticking typewriter that gets me where I'm going! I got an extra 2.9 in storage that is slated to get a complete rebuild along the lines of Sven Pruitt's book, plus a lot of petroleum junkie mods, and hopefully a set of morana racing's improved rockers. It's almost guaranteed, it won't tick! I hope! Haha!
Just so the covid restrictions don't keep increasing... I need to be able to work to buy that junk!
 

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I thought the discussion was about High volume, not high pressure pumps. A high volume pump might crutch a worn out engine, I'd rather rebuild it and use a stock pump because if I try to band aid a problem it always bites me. Increased volume means more drag on the engine, more stress on the pump drive, and more wear on the distributor and cam gear,potentially.
 

RobbieD

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Thanks for the replies so far; very much appreciated.

It is the high volume pump that I'm considering. The engine seems to be in good shape, just had a sudden loss of oil pressure. After the oil and filter change the motor did run quieter, but the pressure is still too low.

In going with the (more expensive) high volume pump I was hoping that I'd see just a little more pressure at warm idle (it was running 10~15 prior).
 


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