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New tools you've bought recently?


JoshT

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Pulled the trigger on this unit today. Should arrive in a few weeks along with 2x 1ton high jack stand
Had to have the 168 model, I am 6'2", own nothing but trucks, including fullsize bronco on 40s. I've heard working on vehicles on lift is completely different, I've used a lift very little. I am so excited tho. Shop is tall enough, built with tall lift in mind
Life goals right there. Want to do the same eventually, but I've got a long way to go before I can even think about building the shop. I'll be going big (for me) on the shop space. Thinking along the lines of 30x40. I'm leaning towards getting one of the "portable" half height max jax lifts. Can be unbolted from the floor and rolled away when you need the space. I wouldn't have a problem with a 4' high lift and a rolling stool, just done with lying on the back. I'd like to have that in addition to a 4 poster. Both styles have their uses.
 


Shran

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Bench is back together, working on dust collection and finding places for a couple things that don’t fit under it anymore. Super happy with how it turned out.

IMG_0842.jpeg

IMG_0843.jpeg
 

lil_Blue_Ford

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Life goals right there. Want to do the same eventually, but I've got a long way to go before I can even think about building the shop. I'll be going big (for me) on the shop space. Thinking along the lines of 30x40. I'm leaning towards getting one of the "portable" half height max jax lifts. Can be unbolted from the floor and rolled away when you need the space. I wouldn't have a problem with a 4' high lift and a rolling stool, just done with lying on the back. I'd like to have that in addition to a 4 poster. Both styles have their uses.
I think you’re thinking too small, lol. The metal garage building I acquired is a like 18x28. I want to extend it another two frames or roughly 8’ more. Then strip the one metal sided garage on my property and add a lean-to area so I have two bays and some shop space, so nearly as big as you are talking. But my plan for that has always been a temporary space. Room to work on two vehicles. The permanent garage is slated to be 30-40’ deep and 80-100’ long. I want work space, a 2-post and 4-post lift, plus some vehicle storage area, ideally with a couple 4-post storage lifts. Tired of everything rusting outside.
 

JoshT

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I think you’re thinking too small, lol. The metal garage building I acquired is a like 18x28. I want to extend it another two frames or roughly 8’ more. Then strip the one metal sided garage on my property and add a lean-to area so I have two bays and some shop space, so nearly as big as you are talking. But my plan for that has always been a temporary space. Room to work on two vehicles. The permanent garage is slated to be 30-40’ deep and 80-100’ long. I want work space, a 2-post and 4-post lift, plus some vehicle storage area, ideally with a couple 4-post storage lifts. Tired of everything rusting outside.
.
30x40 was the main shop space and concrete pad. There would also be a 10' wide lean-to on each side with a storage room built into the back part of one, these would be gravel floored except for the storage room.

In addition I intend to erect another carport for parking other vehicles under. I'll also end up with a few storage building for storage and specialized workspaces.

No need for a storage lift or inside vehicle storage. A covered gravel pad is more than enough for here. Really a concrete pad with a carport over over it would be enough for 75% of the year here, but I want to be able to work all hours without disturbing the neighbors and, more important, I want AC for summer months.
 

Rick W

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.
30x40 was the main shop space and concrete pad. There would also be a 10' wide lean-to on each side with a storage room built into the back part of one, these would be gravel floored except for the storage room.

In addition I intend to erect another carport for parking other vehicles under. I'll also end up with a few storage building for storage and specialized workspaces.

No need for a storage lift or inside vehicle storage. A covered gravel pad is more than enough for here. Really a concrete pad with a carport over over it would be enough for 75% of the year here, but I want to be able to work all hours without disturbing the neighbors and, more important, I want AC for summer months.
A few thoughts….

I apologize for the long text…

And, a basic thought for evaluating anything. If I go to the bar and order an inexpensive glass of wine it’s $10. The good wine is $12, and the best wine is $14. No matter which one I pick, you will be spending the $10. The real decision is what do you get for an additional $2 or $4?

I measured and planned and sketched for a couple of years. My garage/shop/shed of miracles is 45’ deep and 20’ wide. Two Lincoln town cars in front of an F250 long cab, long bed, and a sports car and motorcycles in front of the corner bathroom. I added a carport (after final inspection), that was 10’ wide the full 45’deep.

It’s in the back left corner of my 100x200 half acre property behind the house. I have five power tools built out along the walls.

What I didn’t figure? I added shelves all around that are about 16 inches deep. The tools 24-30” deep. That takes almost 3 feet out of the width. If I had to do over again, I would’ve added at least 2 feet to the width. In the planning, I didn’t want to take any more of the yard than I had to. After having it for 30 years, I wish I made it 5 feet wider, and it wouldn’t affect what we do in the yard at all.

I poured a very substantial concrete pad for the main building. 6” with a 18 inch deep integral footing all around (frost line in Georgia). For those who may not know, the concrete yard typically mixes 2500 psi concrete for driveways and such, and the quality is very shaky. Order 4000 psi concrete, it’s only pennies more, and most important: tell them you are going to “slump test“ it on site and take a crush sample. That’s what’s done in a commercial pour, and it alerts the concrete plant that they have to mix it right and deliver on time without just slopping it up with water. You don’t have to do the tests.

I had half-inch rebar along the footings, and triple across the threshold. I sloped the concrete outward about 6 inches where the side door was going to be so water won’t come in. I used half inch threaded rod, bent into 4“ x 14“ L shape for my anchor bolts, and I put them about every 4 feet. You’ll never guess, but I dipped them in Rustoleum before I pushed them into the concrete.

Code here required a slight bow upward. After my inspection, I added two storm drains in the middle so if I come in with wet vehicles or spill something, it drains to the middle and doesn’t go to the walls and rot them.

Code here if you went up to 10 feet, you had to change the outside walls to two by sixes. I made the walls 9 foot 10. I think I just said it, but if I had to do it over again, I would have built a 12‘ x 20‘, 6 foot upward extension in the back left corner so I could put in a lift.

I didn’t buy W trusses, I made them. If I remember right, they are 23 feet wide with a 5 foot peak. After I had the concrete poured, I used chalk lines and very carefully snapped out all the pieces on the floor. I cut all of the pieces in advance. Then I could lay them in the proper slot. I made truss plates out of half-inch CD X plywood. I put construction glue down on the joints, and then used four deck screws in each piece underneath it, I flipped it over, and did the same thing. The glue actually holds it together, not the screws, but I left them in. At the time, it was less than half the price of buying the trusses. My set might be off by two or 3 inches, it’s absolutely nothing you can see. When I stacked them after making them, I simply sorted them by height, and by length. So the roof may taper, and slope, but it’s all in a row, no peaks and valleys.

I framed each wall laying on the concrete, and then I would flip it over so it was laying in the yard. I did the double top plate to within about 6 feet of each corner.

I bought the tarpaper, the shingles, sheathing for the corners, foam boards for the long runs, and the vinyl siding.

Then I had a big party. I was in a church group at the time, and I got the retail workers, the accountants, the office workers, you name it. I made sure I had three other guys who half knew what they were doing. I did an evaluation of who was good at what before I ever announced the party date. I had a barn raising.

Some of the girls cooked the food and made the picnic, I used the strong guys to help me set the walls and set the trusses, them sheath the corners and then put the plywood up on the roof. It was more production, then it was professional.

I took the one guy who was meticulous, put him with a good-looking helper, gal, and he put the vinyl siding all the way around that shop in one day. I worked on the roof with another guy who half knew what he was doing, and used the rest of the guys to keep feeding us tarpaper and shingles. I got about 2/3 of the roof done. (Hammers, no nail gun!).

We took a break for lunch, but probably got 80% of the building completely built. Then I put a string of work lights inside of it, cranked up the stereo, and we partied till about midnight.

It sounds crazy and crooked, but if you ask those people who never do this kind of work, what their favorite party and the favorite thing they’ve done? they’ll say the barn raising every single time. Labor cost was a quarter keg of beer and a dozen bottles of wine and $150 grocery bill.

I finished up the rest over about a month or so. After I got the final inspection, I poured five 2’ x 2’ concrete pads down the fence line, and I stood 4” posts with a double run of 2 x 6 the length of the shop. I just angled up 10 foot two by fours to match the roofline, and put plywood on it and shingled it to match the roof. My mistake there is i used pressure treated posts, but the two by sixes and the 45° braces were just regular pine. I should have used pressure treated for the two by sixes and the 45° braces were just regular pine. I should have made it all pressure-treated. I fixed that a couple years ago.

Before all that, I ran a circuit from my main panel for a 50 amp panel in the shop. If I did it over, I would’ve put in 100 amp. I also ran natural gas. I used PVC to run a hot water line and a cold water line. I only use the hot about once a year, so I don’t care that it takes five minutes for the heat to build up out there.

After the inspection for the half bathroom, I rearrange the plumbing in the ground so I could put a shower next to it if I ever wanted to. I used a commode and a laundry tub.

I called every overhead door company in Atlanta looking for a used 18 foot wide door. I ended up with a $2500 top-of-the-line steel insulated door for $800. Someone rich ordered it and then didn’t want it. That was $300 more than my budget, but I gave in.

Finally, I made the rounds to three or four HVAC supply companies hunting for a used furnace in their scrap pile. Unfortunately, not all the HVAC installers are honest, so it only took me about a week to find a unit that was in perfect condition, except a bad bearing on the blower wheel ($2.50 at the time). They had taken the relays and such, but they were cheap to replace. I hung it from threaded rods in front of the bathroom, and I had it running in a couple hours. At the time, my house had a 100,000 BTU furnace, and this freebie was 115,000 BTU. Except for the bathroom, the shop is not insulated. For the few times it’s cold enough that I want the heat, I can turn it on 30 minutes before I go out there and hold it at 65° or 70°, and then shut it off, all for pennies. I put a simple on off switch in a series with the thermostat, so I don’t even have to mess with the thermostat. Every other year I have to relight the pilot light.

For the front trim, I just ran two by fours hanging off the plywood roof. And I use deck boards for the facia down the length of each side.

I have a septic field that runs through my backyard, so you can’t just pour concrete over it. I talked to the two brick companies near Atlanta, and I got seconds for $.20 on the dollar. We’re talking about two tractor trailers of bricks, 54 pallets, something like 5000. I got a little bit of gravel, picked up four folks from the local Home Depot, and they graded the driveway from the front back to the front of the carport, and set all the bricks in a herringbone pattern. That pattern conceals a lot of installation defects. I had them run a double row on the outside. For about a month and a half, I used my chopsaw to cut the angled pieces to match the herringbone to the outside loop. There is a turnaround in the back, a turn around in the front, and brick underneath the carport. All of the brick has a belly in the middle, with a 4 inch perforated drain line, including the carport. The only issue I’ve had, no big deal, is they were seconds because some of them were not completely fired. So about a half dozen will absorb water and freeze and break each year. It takes about five minutes to pop one out and put a replacement day.

It looks great, and if you do have to work outside the garage, it’s easier to use jack stands and such.

BTW, after the barn raising and most of the driveway was done, I got hit by the Dunwoody tornado. A 30 inch in diameter pine tree fell straight down the carport and crushed my 84 Silverado 3500 with 47,000 miles on it, and another tree fell and crushed part of the roof, and the carport Wall racked over a little bit popping all the siding off. I won’t go through the detail, because all of that got taken care of by the insurance. & My church crew did far better quality work, than the repair contractor, but it got done.

Hope it all helps, I think I got it done for a quarter of the price everybody quoted me, and I had a blast doing it.

Again, sorry for the long posting
 

scotts90ranger

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Here's the new bead breaking tool, no regerts! Mechanical advantage is fantastic! The inner bead was pristine but the outer was rusty for whatever reason...

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Harbor Freight?
 

Shran

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.
30x40 was the main shop space and concrete pad. There would also be a 10' wide lean-to on each side with a storage room built into the back part of one, these would be gravel floored except for the storage room.

In addition I intend to erect another carport for parking other vehicles under. I'll also end up with a few storage building for storage and specialized workspaces.

No need for a storage lift or inside vehicle storage. A covered gravel pad is more than enough for here. Really a concrete pad with a carport over over it would be enough for 75% of the year here, but I want to be able to work all hours without disturbing the neighbors and, more important, I want AC for summer months.
30x40 is a good size if you don't park anything in it. It also depends on which side the garage doors are on..... my shop is 30x40 with two 10' wide doors on the long side of the building. My F250 just barely fits. A bigger truck (dually, or crew cab long box) would not fit. Well, it would fit, but you would have just a couple feet of room on the ends of the truck to work, so what's the point. Putting the doors on the short sides is better in that regard - my buddy has the same size shop with a door on end end and it feels like it's got twice as much room.

I usually have a couple trucks parked in mine which is nice to keep them out of the weather but it really cuts my work area down to a small space.
 

JoshT

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30x40 is a good size if you don't park anything in it. It also depends on which side the garage doors are on..... my shop is 30x40 with two 10' wide doors on the long side of the building. My F250 just barely fits. A bigger truck (dually, or crew cab long box) would not fit. Well, it would fit, but you would have just a couple feet of room on the ends of the truck to work, so what's the point. Putting the doors on the short sides is better in that regard - my buddy has the same size shop with a door on end end and it feels like it's got twice as much room.

I usually have a couple trucks parked in mine which is nice to keep them out of the weather but it really cuts my work area down to a small space.
Plan is for two 10' doors on end plus maybe an 8 foot on the side of the opposite end.

Only.weather related reason for parking inside around here would be the shade during summer. A carport would do just as well for that. Winters aren't harsh enough to need indoor parking. The only other reason a garage would be nice is critters climbing on them. Racoons, opossums, and the neighbor's cats. Need to start getting rid of some of them
 

Shran

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Plan is for two 10' doors on end plus maybe an 8 foot on the side of the opposite end.

Only.weather related reason for parking inside around here would be the shade during summer. A carport would do just as well for that. Winters aren't harsh enough to need indoor parking. The only other reason a garage would be nice is critters climbing on them. Racoons, opossums, and the neighbor's cats. Need to start getting rid of some of them
If you can do one really wide door or a couple of 12' doors, you will probably not regret it. 10' seems like enough but it's a little tight if I pull my F250 in. I can't go in at an angle like I can with my little trucks which is annoying. I went with two 10's to give me room to put my tools & stuff on the left/west side of the building, my big tool box is between the walk in door and the left garage door. My welder is between the doors & the compressor is on the right side of the building next to the right door.

Two 12's would have fit but it would have required me to rethink where equipment ended up. I don't think I would have liked to have it arranged much different than it is now.

IMG_20160515_183609395.jpg
 

sgtsandman

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I stopped by Harbor Freight after work to pick up some stuff. I finally broke down and bought a transfer punch set.



Picked up a scratch awl since they are on clearance ($0.97) and I don't have one.



They finally had the bug zappers in stock. So, picked up one of them.



And I picked up flush cut pliers that I've been meaning to get for quite some time. They are pretty small but most of the time I just need them for zip ties and those are normally the small, thin ones.

 

scotts90ranger

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Those red handled cutters are pretty good for zip ties and fine stuff, I've had solid luck with them.

Didn't realize the transfer punches came with a different holder, the old one was kinda cheezy, that looks like better plastic...
 

sgtsandman

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Those red handled cutters are pretty good for zip ties and fine stuff, I've had solid luck with them.

Didn't realize the transfer punches came with a different holder, the old one was kinda cheezy, that looks like better plastic...
I looked for bigger ones while I was there but missed them. The website says the store has them. Oh well, I have more of a need and use for the small ones any way. The bigger ones would have been more of a nice to have item.
 

ericbphoto

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Just arrived. Tiger Tools 10105 U-Joint puller.
20240621_193218.jpg
 

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