• Welcome Visitor! Please take a few seconds and Register for our forum. Even if you don't want to post, you can still 'Like' and react to posts.

Head Gaskets

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
1994 Ford Ranger
Manual Transmission
276k Miles

I appreciate this forum and everyone that contributes to it. I am a long time viewer and this is my first post.

After testing, it is certain that the passenger side (left?) head gasket is blown. No coolant entered the oil, or vice versa, which I suppose is lucky. Due to financial and time constraints (long story), I poured some Blue Devil in the truck; it ran fine for a while and the leak seemed plugged. Now coolant pours out of the water pump. (I regret using the gasket sealing b/s like one might regret a drunken one-night stand.)

I have decided to do the gasket repair myself. If nothing else, it will be a good learning experience. I would appreciate any guidance on the process.

First things first, I will begin tearing the engine down as soon as possible. The biggest problem I face is time constraints and facilities; I usually work until dark and I have no garage.

There were a few more problems with the truck that I will outline here soon, along with progress reports. Thank you everyone!

Here is synopsis.
-Head Gasket Blown
--Going to attempt to replace
---Will go ahead and do both gaskets
----Also water pump
-----Probably other things, but money is tight

Till I get her fixed, It is two-heel drive for me :annoyed:
 


Rock Auto 5% Discount Code: BD8D9A3814E19D Expires July 5th, 2022

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
The gasket failure was caused by over-heating.
The temperature guage had been broken for a while, and I had tried to fix it a few times, but failed. During the 'Blue Devil' extravaganza, a mechanical guage was installed.

Long story short, the coolant system will be thoroughly inspected during this process.

Thanks!

Bob
 

Rearanger

Active Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2008
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
22
Points
38
Location
Southeast USA
Vehicle Year
2003
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
I would appreciate any guidance on the process.
Buy an inexpensive Haynes Manual ($15) at local parts store for your year Ranger. It will be good guide to doing the job right.
 

RonD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2012
Messages
21,737
Reaction score
5,136
Points
113
Location
canada
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
My '94 had a "blown head gasket", but it wasn't the head gasket once I got inside.
One head was cracked between intake and exhaust valve seats, this is a weak point in the 4.0l head casting, and crack comes after overheating.

There is no difference in the symptoms, only for sure difference is that there couldn't be coolant in oil with a cracked head, but there could be with a blown head gasket, but not always.

Since money is tight I thought I would mention this, so you can be prepared with a possible line on a new/rebuilt head if one turns out to be cracked.
If you see a line between valve seats that's a crack, doesn't look like much but head is worthless now.
Head gasket breach can usually be seen pretty easily, look at each metal ring on the gasket, top and bottom, these are surrounded by coolant holes.
You will see a discoloration and path from metal ring to coolant passage hole.

Head bolts are TTY(torque to yield) so should not be reused, extra expense.
You can reuse them but best case scenario is 1 or 2 will break when torquing them down, worse case is that 1 or 2 will break within a month of installation.

Head gasket sealer didn't hurt water pump, doesn't hurt anything really, it isn't like coolant sealer as far as clogging things up.
It is a heat activated sealer so only hardens when exposed to high inside cylinder temps, above 650degF.
But always a good idea to flush any cooling system, and back flush heater core.

Exhaust manifold bolts can be a pain if this is the first time they have been removed.
After running in to a couple of tight ones on each side I removed the pipe from manifold and pulled heads with exhaust manifolds still attached, better option than stripping the bolt heads.
Easier to remove the bolts on a bench.
 
Last edited:

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
Thanks for the advice!

I have had a Haynes manual since day one and have used it nearly to the point of disintegration lol.

Thanks for the tips RonD.

I do intend to use new head bolts. As for the manifold bolts, I was looking at it the other day and noticed one is simply not there! Never noticed that before.
Hopefully, I can get the rest out with some liberal use of PB Blaster.

I will check the heads thoroughly when I get to them. I hope there are no cracks or warpage, but I suppose that will be revealed.

The reason I mentioned the water pump is that after using 'Blue Devil' the engine seemed to run fine for a while but now coolant literally pours out of the pump. Basically, I was foolish and did not pressure test anything after gasket sealing, but I did replace the thermostat and the radiator cap. Not sure what I will actually find, but today is the day I begin.

There is a video on youtube of a head gasket job done on a v6 3.0 in a Ford Taurus. It is 1 hour long and I believe the guy posted the actual full length detailed job somewhere.

I wish I could remove the block, but simply do not have the wherewithall. One concern for me is the bolt on the rear passenger side. It is obstructed by the some large insulated component (air conditioner blower assembly?) Hope can move it and get a bit of wiggle room.

The other concern is time. This job is taking place outside in a driveway and I do not like the idea of the engine open for too long a duration. I do not plan on getting a single bolt until I am sure it is just the gasket.

Thanks again!
 

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
Fan Clutch Woes

Trying to remove the fan clutch today. Haynes calls for a special tool that I rented, but I do not understand why I would remove the drivebelt, loosen the pulley, and use a 48mm wrench (or whichever it is) to hold the pulley stationary.

Youtube is less than helpful as there are videos of people doing it in a variety of ways; one guy uses 2 pipe wrenches. Can someone explain to me how this guy removes it using this large of a wrench? (skip to 1:40 to save yourself from terrible ford jokes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-FNQ2yRL40

What is he engaging? It looks to me that I need a much smaller wrench or a vise-grip and that I should leave the belt ON to hold the pulley; possibly using the configuration posted in this forum Here
I ran out of daylight and it is 20degrees out, so I will try again later.

I am also having a difficult time with the tension pulley. I have removed/replaced the belt a few times, so I understand what should be done to relieve tension, but the thing seems to be seized up for some reason.

Thanks for any insight
 

Rearanger

Active Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2008
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
22
Points
38
Location
Southeast USA
Vehicle Year
2003
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
You can attempt to use a strap wrench to hold the pulley while you use a wrench (bigger the better) with a big hammer to knock the nut loose. You'll need a helper. Comment on other thread about this said Ford uses thread lock.

I found the strap wrench absorbed much of the force of the hammer blow to the wrench and finally applied heat to the nut to get it loose. Propane torch will not apply heat quickly enough without melting surrounding rubber/plastic - best to use acetylene. It's a bitch thanks to Ford engineering.

I made a custom tool for the next time that uses two of the pulley bolts to hold the clutch bolt from turning. If you can find such a special tool it will make it a lot easier.

At 20* F I feel your pain.
 

bucko

New Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Messages
80
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Vehicle Year
2000
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
Forget the strap wrench if this is the first time that clutch fan is being removed; that nut will have "welded" itself onto the waterpump threaded shaft!

I had a clutch fan replaced by a shop; about 4 days later, the roar of that new clutch fan was driving me nuts, so I went the route of a good e-fan install. I figured since the clutch fan was only 4 days old, that bolt would be a piece of cake to loosen; no way! I ended up taking it back to the shop that installed it, and watched their mechanic spend about 20 minutes with his air tool finally get it loose!

Let us know how the head gasket replacement goes. Fingers crossed for you that its not a crack.
 

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
Update

Thank you all for the advice and cautions!

Finally, found some time today to do some work.

I was worried about the fan clutch, but it turned out to be very easy. I simply removed the pulley and attached an angle iron via a bolt to the cast iron (to impede movement) and applied force to the fan clutch using a vise-grip (tightened very tightly) and a breaker bar (which was a large pipe I had lying around). Came off very easy. I found a video that inspired me, but I cannot seem to find it now to show, sorry. Some people anchor the pulley with a chain.

The intake manifold is now out and the driver side valve cover is fairly well ready to be removed, but I am having some difficulty with the fuel rail. I suppose I need to purchase a special tool to remove some fuel lines. Do I need to remove the distributer to finish this job? It seems I might, but it is hard to tell..

I mentioned earlier that I was going to have difficulty with the passenger-side rear bolt. I still have not tried to remove the blower unit, and I am still unsure what to do to gain access. All I need to do is be able to remove the bolt, and replace with proper torque. Sounds easy, but I can tell by looking it will be a bear.

I feel I will get the heads out soon and will try and post some pics.

Thanks for any insight into fuel line removal and access to that one valve cover (and eventually head) bolt.

Bob Dobbs
 

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
Just a few quirks:

Missing bolt on A/C compressor. Odd
Missing some component on Upper Intake. Not sure how to describe.
Think Heater Core is shot, going to go ahead and pull it out and see.
Bolt on water pump was easy to remove by hand. Was not tightened properly.

Should have done all the work myself. At least then I would know who to blame :D
 

RonD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2012
Messages
21,737
Reaction score
5,136
Points
113
Location
canada
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
On my '94 4.0l the fuel lines are held on by nuts, compression fittings.
On your 3.0l they could have the Ford spring clips, like fuel filter lines.

Yes there is a tool that slides into the connector and releases the spring clip.
Picture here: http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/992912-94-3-0l-help-fuel-rail-disconnect.html
There are also plastic "rings" that do the same thing, pictured here: http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1199493-need-help-on-1998-and-2000-ford-ranger-fuel-lines.html

You shouldn't need to move blower housing.
 

BabyBronco89

New Member
Solid Axle Swap
Joined
Dec 9, 2011
Messages
360
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Location
GR Michigan
Vehicle Year
1989
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Size
95' 4.0 OHV
Transmission
Manual
That furthest corner bolt can be a pita, but it will come out without taking the ac blower out, as far as the heater core, you have to remove the entire dash,


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

RonD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2012
Messages
21,737
Reaction score
5,136
Points
113
Location
canada
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
On the '94 there are just 4 screws under the glove box that need to be removed to pull out the heater core.

Replacement core is under $30
 

Bob Dobbs

New Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2014
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
I really appreciate the insights. Thank you all!

It is difficult to find time to work on the truck. I work until dark at my regular job.
I have a light, and am going to try and get the valve covers off tomorrow, if possible. Just a few things I wanted to ask about:

RonD said:
There is no difference in the symptoms, only for sure difference is that there couldn't be coolant in oil with a cracked head, but there could be with a blown head gasket, but not always.
This worries me. The lack of coolant in the oil makes me wonder, but, when the problem was diagnosed, the coolant leaked out from a (hopefully) blown gasket in the following (crudely drawn) configuration:

back
[O | O]
[O | O]
{O | O]
front

With the '{' denoting the coolant leak and it leaked in the direction it points. Pretty sure I will find a mess on that cylinder.

My main concern, for now, is that the engine will be exposed to the elements quite a bit. Rain is occuring now, and snow is possible this weekend (Note- I still have the hood attached). I do not have the required bolts and gaskets to finish the rebuild quickly. So... What is the best way to protect the exposed cylinders and such. Wish I had an inside garage, but what can you do? At the moment, I have tinfoil covering the intake manifold mating surface. I worry about frost, condensation, and the holidays are pretty much here..

If the heads are cracked or warped beyond my capabilities to repair; what are some ideas to protect the block during the time it would take to find replacements, get them machined, etc? Am I over-thinking this? lol

I am worried this will take a few weeks.
I appreciate the help!
 

Rearanger

Active Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2008
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
22
Points
38
Location
Southeast USA
Vehicle Year
2003
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
What is the best way to protect the exposed cylinders and such.
You can use white lithium grease. It sticks and will clean off easily. Any residue will quickly liquify when engine hot and mix with engine oil. You may have to degrease mating surfaces of cylinder head/block before installing gaskets.
 

Sponsored Ad


Sponsored Ad

Top