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Going back in.... last time i hope..

Shadowridr1

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Shadowridr1

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Orca

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I looked at all 3 videos. FWIW, one thing I noticed is that the fuel injector pulse widths on your 3.0L engine are noticeably higher (for both banks) than the typical PW values I see on my 4.0L engine (2.5 - 3.0 msec at idle). Given the engine difference, I don't know if that's something to be concerned about or not.

And your "O2S21" (Bank #2, upstream) voltage plots still look odd, to my eye. They "hang" toward the lower end (low voltage, high O2 content, "lean") of the graph unlike the normal-looking "O2S11" graphs.

It might not be conclusive and it might not be worth the effort, but you could consider physically swapping the bank 1 and 2 upstream O2 sensors to see if the "weird" bank #2 sensor output physically follows the sensor to Bank #1 or if the "weird" output remains with Bank #2. If the weird output follows the sensor, you could consider replacing that sensor. But if it doesn't follow the sensor, you couldn't be sure because it could still be a sensor wiring issue or an issue with something else entirely. Frustrating, I know.
 

O No 3.0!

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As far as the e-fan goes, you can get a simple thermostatic fan switch off ebay for about 20 bucks. Its easy to hook up & comes with the wiring & instructions. Takes about 30 mins to install.
 

Shadowridr1

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As far as the e-fan goes, you can get a simple thermostatic fan switch off ebay for about 20 bucks. Its easy to hook up & comes with the wiring & instructions. Takes about 30 mins to install.
The efan is on hiatus until I can figure out why in the hell this thing ain't running right
 

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Yes sir, I saw your post. Idk why the c1230 is coming up. I unplugged the ABS sensor and made sure it was plugged back in, otherwise I haven't messed with any sensors. 🤷‍♂️
I took video of
Bank 1
Bank 2
And O2S & fuel trims. I will load them shortly
In regard to the rear axle/differential speed sensor, they are funny to plug in sometimes, it can feel like its in but you need to kind of tuck in/slide the part into the sleeve/connector just a wee bit more.....this happened to me I thought I had it in all the way and didn't ,abs light came on, double checked it, saw my error, fixed it, no abs light.............may want to double check
 

Shadowridr1

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Ok, so I'm fed up with BANGING MY HEAD ON this 03-3oh..........started out 2 months ago with a very rough idle, misfiring, and hesitation. I change plugs, wires and coil pack. This did not resolve the issue. I ran a compression test and had low compression #5. So I tore into the engine and replaced both heads, lifters, pushrods and rocker bridges. Also replaced synchronizer and CPS, thermostat, IAC, PCV elbow assembly, oil switch. This helped the compression but that was it. I've replaced the injectors, all pigtails to each injector, all 3-O2 sensors, MAF, fuel pump, fuel filter, evap purge valve, changed oil again and plugs again. After doing this the pickup ran great for 30 mins. I brought it back home turned it off and let it sit for about an hr. I went to start it and it had a misfire, hesitation revving it up and a tick in the engine at 2k rpm. I put the fuel pressure tester on it and get 60psi koeo. I start it and the pressure gauge is bouncing erratic between 58-65psi. I replaced the fuel damper this morning and it's still doing the same shit. Misfiring, piss poor revving and still a tick at about 2k rpm... not pulling any CEL, DTC'S are not showing anything pointing to the fuel system or timing. Pickup starts with a little hesitation, Fuel trims are bad, o2 bank 2 is reading odd. IAT reads about 70 when truck is at 185 ECT. I HAVE LITERALLY replaced OR cleaned everything except the CSPS, timing chain tensioner and TPS. I've check and smoke tested for vacuum leaks, can't find anything, RESET all DTC'S ran tests..... codes that pop up constantly are P1000, C1230 and P500....I'm done, idk what else to do..... why it ran great for 30 minutes and then back to screwing up I HAVE NO IDEA.... RonD, Orca and others I appreciate the help, but I really don't know what to do anymore. I'm still open to suggestions and I'll run tests if you can think of what needs ran.
 

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Ok, so I'm fed up with BANGING MY HEAD ON this 03-3oh..........started out 2 months ago with a very rough idle, misfiring, and hesitation. I change plugs, wires and coil pack. This did not resolve the issue. I ran a compression test and had low compression #5. So I tore into the engine and replaced both heads, lifters, pushrods and rocker bridges. Also replaced synchronizer and CPS, thermostat, IAC, PCV elbow assembly, oil switch. This helped the compression but that was it. I've replaced the injectors, all pigtails to each injector, all 3-O2 sensors, MAF, fuel pump, fuel filter, evap purge valve, changed oil again and plugs again. After doing this the pickup ran great for 30 mins. I brought it back home turned it off and let it sit for about an hr. I went to start it and it had a misfire, hesitation revving it up and a tick in the engine at 2k rpm. I put the fuel pressure tester on it and get 60psi koeo. I start it and the pressure gauge is bouncing erratic between 58-65psi. I replaced the fuel damper this morning and it's still doing the same shit. Misfiring, piss poor revving and still a tick at about 2k rpm... not pulling any CEL, DTC'S are not showing anything pointing to the fuel system or timing. Pickup starts with a little hesitation, Fuel trims are bad, o2 bank 2 is reading odd. IAT reads about 70 when truck is at 185 ECT. I HAVE LITERALLY replaced OR cleaned everything except the CSPS, timing chain tensioner and TPS. I've check and smoke tested for vacuum leaks, can't find anything, RESET all DTC'S ran tests..... codes that pop up constantly are P1000, C1230 and P500....I'm done, idk what else to do..... why it ran great for 30 minutes and then back to screwing up I HAVE NO IDEA.... RonD, Orca and others I appreciate the help, but I really don't know what to do anymore. I'm still open to suggestions and I'll run tests if you can think of what needs ran.
I'm not suggesting that any of what I say below will solve your problem(s), but since you're giving up, I'm going to throw out a bunch of ideas, in no particular order, shotgun-style, in case any of them prove helpful:
  1. Walk away for a week then start diagnosing from scratch.
  2. Carefully re-read this thread and your other earlier thread. Sometimes that will trigger a thought or make you realize that you missed something.
  3. Get someone else to look at it, especially the plug wires on the coil pack. And/or explain it to someone who doesn't know how it works (your daughter?) and, in the process, maybe notice something you missed the first 'n' times.
  4. Consider putting one of the old O2 sensors in at Bank #2 to see if it performs more like you'd expect.
  5. Take advantage of the gracious offer of @mc17eln to compare your values with his 3.0L engine. For example, I'd like to know what his warmed-up, idle-RPM fuel injector pulse width values (both banks) are under FORScan. A graph of those would be very useful, IMHO. I've given you my 4.0L-engine values, but his would be more useful.
  6. Since you say they're the only things that haven't been touched, check your CKP (Crankshaft Position) sensor and your TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) with FORScan graphs. There is a PID ("PCM.RPM", I think) for RPM (to check CKP) and for TPS (you'll have to find that one -- there are probably several) in FORScan. Might as well see how they graph when running the engine at various throttle positions. You want to see nice, smooth transitions with no unexpected spikes or odd (too-low or too-high) values. Graph the 2 PIDs simultaneously.
  7. If you think the engine will stay running at idle, clear KAM (Keep-Alive Memory) by disconnecting the battery for 10 minutes then re-connect and run the engine for 15 minutes at idle with A/C off. This will re-learn the 'idle air trim' values for that condition.
How well is the engine actually running at idle? Can the truck be safely driven at all?
 

mc17eln

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@Shadowridr1 I was expecting you to recount the fuel contamination, but you didn't. I don't recall anything more damning and conclusive than that. Therefore, let me add:

8a. Re-test fuel quality as you did before. Be sure to let the output sit overnight to be conclusive; or​
8b. If you can borrow a clean fuel cell, replace your fuel tank with the cell, plus a fire extinguisher.​

Yeah, feel free to send me a set of FORScan parameters and duration. I'll be glad to report back.
 

Shadowridr1

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I'm not suggesting that any of what I say below will solve your problem(s), but since you're giving up, I'm going to throw out a bunch of ideas, in no particular order, shotgun-style, in case any of them prove helpful:
  1. Walk away for a week then start diagnosing from scratch.
  2. Carefully re-read this thread and your other earlier thread. Sometimes that will trigger a thought or make you realize that you missed something.
  3. Get someone else to look at it, especially the plug wires on the coil pack. And/or explain it to someone who doesn't know how it works (your daughter?) and, in the process, maybe notice something you missed the first 'n' times.
  4. Consider putting one of the old O2 sensors in at Bank #2 to see if it performs more like you'd expect.
  5. Take advantage of the gracious offer of @mc17eln to compare your values with his 3.0L engine. For example, I'd like to know what his warmed-up, idle-RPM fuel injector pulse width values (both banks) are under FORScan. A graph of those would be very useful, IMHO. I've given you my 4.0L-engine values, but his would be more useful.
  6. Since you say they're the only things that haven't been touched, check your CKP (Crankshaft Position) sensor and your TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) with FORScan graphs. There is a PID ("PCM.RPM", I think) for RPM (to check CKP) and for TPS (you'll have to find that one -- there are probably several) in FORScan. Might as well see how they graph when running the engine at various throttle positions. You want to see nice, smooth transitions with no unexpected spikes or odd (too-low or too-high) values. Graph the 2 PIDs simultaneously.
  7. If you think the engine will stay running at idle, clear KAM (Keep-Alive Memory) by disconnecting the battery for 10 minutes then re-connect and run the engine for 15 minutes at idle with A/C off. This will re-learn the 'idle air trim' values for that condition.
How well is the engine actually running at idle? Can the truck be safely driven at all?
1. I haven't messed with it for a couple days, and probably won't until Sunday
2. I've been reading my old post and have gone through a lot of others as well. It lead me to do nothing but research today.
3. I say down with a buddy who, tinkers with old cars only, so he was a good sounding board
4. Changing the O2 would just be a total pain in the ass. But I might do it anyway, just to rule it out.
5. I guess I completely missed that post or just didn't follow what was being said. I would love to compare. That would probably help a lot.
6. I'm thinking of just replacing them, honestly. Neither are expensive and both are pretty easy to deal with.
7. Every time I stop messing with it for an extended period, I disconnect the battery and cross connect the battery cables.

@Shadowridr1 I was expecting you to recount the fuel contamination, but you didn't. I don't recall anything more damning and conclusive than that. Therefore, let me add:

8a. Re-test fuel quality as you did before. Be sure to let the output sit overnight to be conclusive; or​
8b. If you can borrow a clean fuel cell, replace your fuel tank with the cell, plus a fire extinguisher.​

Yeah, feel free to send me a set of FORScan parameters and duration. I'll be glad to report back.
I did a few key cycles in a jar after doing so the fuel pump, tank cleaning and fuel filter. It was clean with just a little cloud look. No water or dust look at all. I'm ordering a fuel damper and will be putting that on in a few days, cause my fuel pressure test gauge was bouncing like rock concert was going on when the engine was running. When I do that I'll get some readings.
Soooooo with that all said, I read a lot on fuel trims. I looked back at old videos from first of November and compared them to videos from November 18. Then looking at the videos of the other day, They are all ALMOST IDENTICAL. I've kinda narrowed down my issue to a vacuum leak or bad PCM.
You guys really don't know how much I appreciate the help. I'm just feeling like I'm going rounds with a professional heavy weight boxer. I'm tired of the ass whooping, 😆....
 

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pjtoledo

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first, I haven't recently read all the posts, so please forgive me if this is a duplicate.

have you had a vacuum gauge on the intake while the fuel pressure is bouncing around?
 

Shadowridr1

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first, I haven't recently read all the posts, so please forgive me if this is a duplicate.

have you had a vacuum gauge on the intake while the fuel pressure is bouncing around?
No sir don't have a vacuum gauge, and that was the first time I hooked up the fuel gauge.
 

Eddo Rogue

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I would like to add some shotgun suggestions...or what I would do in your shoes, probably in this order....

1) Check all the stupid silly stuff that may have been moved, broken off or kinked during wrenching.
2) Check all the stupid stuff I never would think it could be. Front to back... It could be something far fetched like a dead rat or prank potato in the tailpipe, or clogged cats or air filter...
3) Start over, take it all apart again and put it back together.
4) Start over, pull the motor, put it in the trash can, and buy a new used motor (and ECM,PCM,MAF etc... too).
5) hack the back half off and make it a trailer, donate the rest to Kars or Kids for a nice tax write off, and go buy another Ranger.
 

Shadowridr1

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I would like to add some shotgun suggestions...or what I would do in your shoes, probably in this order....

1) Check all the stupid silly stuff that may have been moved, broken off or kinked during wrenching.
2) Check all the stupid stuff I never would think it could be. Front to back... It could be something far fetched like a dead rat or prank potato in the tailpipe, or clogged cats or air filter...
3) Start over, take it all apart again and put it back together.
4) Start over, pull the motor, put it in the trash can, and buy a new used motor (and ECM,PCM,MAF etc... too).
5) hack the back half off and make it a trailer, donate the rest to Kars or Kids for a nice tax write off, and go buy another Ranger.
🤣, I have literally done number 1, and did number 2 when I went back in and replaced the lifters and pushrods. Numbers 3,4,5 have crossed my mind many times. My number 6 thought is to tear it down, sell all the new stuff, buy a v8 and go that route.
 

Orca

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6. I'm thinking of just replacing them, honestly. Neither are expensive and both are pretty easy to deal with.
I really think you need to stop replacing parts unless/until you know they're bad. It might seem like you're narrowing the problem down when you do it but, given the potential for an unreliable new part, you're really just widening the problem, making diagnosis even more difficult, IMHO. I assisted a guy a while back who replaced the same part twice -- he had 2 bad new parts and the 3rd (this time, OEM) one finally worked. How did he figure that out? By testing the 2nd new part, with FORScan, and finding that it was bad.

So, if it's useful to use a scantool to check the quality of a new part, why not (where possible, of course) do the same thing before you replace the part and possibly avoid the 'part replacement' step entirely?
7. Every time I stop messing with it for an extended period, I disconnect the battery and cross connect the battery cables.
Every time you reset KAM (by cross-connecting the battery cables), you're effectively "yanking the rug out from under" the PCM. This is highly inadvisable. You're resetting all sorts of things that you do NOT want to be reset. It's potentially even worse than the people who naively "clear codes" with a scantool at every opportunity. Resetting KAM should be reserved for very special circumstances, like replacing a part (e.g. IAC) for which the PCM needs its memory reset because it needs to "re-learn" something.
 
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