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Going back in.... last time i hope..


Shadowridr1

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I really think you need to stop replacing parts unless/until you know they're bad. It might seem like you're narrowing the problem down when you do it but, given the potential for an unreliable new part, you're really just widening the problem, making diagnosis even more difficult, IMHO. I assisted a guy a while back who replaced the same part twice -- he had 2 bad new parts and the 3rd (this time, OEM) one finally worked. How did he figure that out? By testing the 2nd new part, with FORScan, and finding that it was bad.

So, if it's useful to use a scantool to check the quality of a new part, why not (where possible, of course) do the same thing before you replace the part and possibly avoid the 'part replacement' step entirely?Every time you reset KAM (by cross-connecting the battery cables), you're effectively "yanking the rug out from under" the PCM. This is highly inadvisable. You're resetting all sorts of things that you do NOT want to be reset. It's potentially even worse than the people who naively "clear codes" with a scantool at every opportunity. Resetting KAM should be reserved for very special circumstances, like replacing a part (e.g. IAC) for which the PCM needs its memory reset because it needs to "re-learn" something.
Orca, I'm a mechanics dream. My OCD and lack of experience kill me when it comes to stuff like this. I go parts slinging and don't think about what I'm doing. I suggested replacing them because I've gone this far... so why not, right. I cross the cables cause usually when I stop messing with it for the day, a new part is coming or it's gonna sit for a couple days. I don't want to leave the battery connected cause I'm afraid I'll forget and leave something on or not shut the door all the way, and drain the battery. But I will not do it anymore. I think what I probably need to do, is put the new damper in, which will be here in 5-7 days, along with a new, better OBD2 scanner, been needing to upgrade anyway. I've had this one for 6 yrs and it won't connect sometimes or has a connection error message sometimes PLUS it is very limited on reading my frontier, plug my phone in, pull up the forscan app and just go drive it. Probably need to set the bed back on so I'll have tail lights though...I know I can't dance I'm a 1 step forward 2 steps back knucklehead when I get too focused on a problem.
 
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Rock Auto 5% Discount Code: 70D65189E6D8FF: January 5th, 2022

Orca

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Orca, I'm a mechanics dream. My OCD and lack of experience kill me when it comes to stuff like this. I go parts slinging and don't think about what I'm doing. I suggested replacing them because I've gone this far... so why not, right.
:) Understood. But I'm hoping that you'll fight that urge in the future and thereby stop being "your own worst enemy". ;)
I cross the cables cause usually when I stop messing with it for the day, a new part is coming or it's gonna sit for a couple days. I don't want to leave the battery connected cause I'm afraid I'll forget and leave something on or not shut the door all the way, and drain the battery.
FWIW, I use several Deltran 'Battery Tender Junior' devices on a lot of things around here. Had 1 of 6 fail so far, but the other 5 have been reliable, over 3-4 years now.
But I will not do it anymore.
Glad to hear that!
I think what I probably need to do, is put the new damper in, which will be here in 5-7 days, along with a new, better OBD2 scanner.
Sounds wise. But I'd save the money and keep using your current OBD2 scantool. You've already proven (via your DTC screenshots) that it's seemingly capable of talking to all the modules (PCM, ABS, GEM, etc) on your Mazda, so why buy another one? No need, IMHO. EDIT: Oh, after your edit, I see that there is a valid reason.
 
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Shadowridr1

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Yeah, it's an old elm 327.... Sometimes I lose connection with the vehicle or it won't connect with my phone. I got it in 2012 when I bought an f250 with the 6OHH in it from an old farmer. I opted to UP grade to the OBDLink MX+. It should be perfect for all my vehicles.
 

Shadowridr1

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Uploaded 4 new videos today.
This was about a 30min drive.
 

Orca

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I took a look at all 4 videos. You're getting good at this! You've got good combinations of PIDs recorded simultaneously.

And the graphed data doesn't look that bad, to my eye. (I'd been wondering what happened to "O2S22" [Bank 2, downstream], but then I realized that you only have 1 downstream sensor.) I will look at all the graphs again later, but I don't see anything horribly out of place on first look.

But how's the truck actually running?

Also, since you stopped unplugging the battery, have you made sure to let the truck idle for a steady 15 minutes (to re-learn idle air trim values)?

A couple of tips for future recording:
  1. Sorry that I didn't think to mention this before, but I noticed that some of your PIDs have "OBDII" in the name given by FORScan developers. Nothing inherently wrong with that, but mixing such PIDs in with non-"OBDII" PIDs will probably cause a slower overall update rate on all PIDs. So if you can find an equivalently named PID without "OBDII" in the name, that should allow for a higher overall rate when querying PIDs with FORScan. (It has to do with avoiding constant switching between 2 common OBD Modes used to gather vehicle data.)
  2. Don't bother graphing ECT. The value changes so slowly and infrequently that it's usually a waste of scantool bandwidth, which could be put to better use on the other PIDs with frequently-changing values. Just be sure that the engine is always well warmed up before collecting any data.
Your RPM PID is reporting just fine. I would not worry about or touch the CKP (Crankshaft Position) sensor.

Consider graphing TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) sometime. I suspect it's fine, but it will only take a few minutes to find out. And you can do it without even running the engine.

It's hard to diagnose from a distance, but I'd try running the vehicle enough (with a fuel tank about 1/4 to 3/4 full) for some of the "vehicle monitors" to start completing and for the P1000 DTC to go away. Use FORScan (under "Tests", "Read system monitor status" in FORScan Lite, I think) to check the completion status of the monitors and report back here, please. Then search the Internet for "Ford drive cycle". This will explain how to drive the truck to deal with any "incomplete" vehicle monitors.

And don't forget to keep checking the DTCs -- for both new ones and for any that have cleared on their own. Report any changes here.

Lastly, don't forget to use FORScan to check for Mode $06 data (per-cylinder misfires, etc), as we discussed quite a while back.

I still think you can solve these issues. You're on the right track, as far as I can see.
 

O No 3.0!

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Go run the shiit out of it. When it breaks, fix it. Problem solved.
 

Shadowridr1

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That's big NEGATIVE. This truck is for my 16yr old daughter. No way am i going to put her behind the wheel of something that's not right
 

Shadowridr1

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I took a look at all 4 videos. You're getting good at this! You've got good combinations of PIDs recorded simultaneously.

And the graphed data doesn't look that bad, to my eye. (I'd been wondering what happened to "O2S22" [Bank 2, downstream], but then I realized that you only have 1 downstream sensor.) I will look at all the graphs again later, but I don't see anything horribly out of place on first look.

But how's the truck actually running?

Also, since you stopped unplugging the battery, have you made sure to let the truck idle for a steady 15 minutes (to re-learn idle air trim values)?

A couple of tips for future recording:
  1. Sorry that I didn't think to mention this before, but I noticed that some of your PIDs have "OBDII" in the name given by FORScan developers. Nothing inherently wrong with that, but mixing such PIDs in with non-"OBDII" PIDs will probably cause a slower overall update rate on all PIDs. So if you can find an equivalently named PID without "OBDII" in the name, that should allow for a higher overall rate when querying PIDs with FORScan. (It has to do with avoiding constant switching between 2 common OBD Modes used to gather vehicle data.)
  2. Don't bother graphing ECT. The value changes so slowly and infrequently that it's usually a waste of scantool bandwidth, which could be put to better use on the other PIDs with frequently-changing values. Just be sure that the engine is always well warmed up before collecting any data.
Your RPM PID is reporting just fine. I would not worry about or touch the CKP (Crankshaft Position) sensor.

Consider graphing TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) sometime. I suspect it's fine, but it will only take a few minutes to find out. And you can do it without even running the engine.

It's hard to diagnose from a distance, but I'd try running the vehicle enough (with a fuel tank about 1/4 to 3/4 full) for some of the "vehicle monitors" to start completing and for the P1000 DTC to go away. Use FORScan (under "Tests", "Read system monitor status" in FORScan Lite, I think) to check the completion status of the monitors and report back here, please. Then search the Internet for "Ford drive cycle". This will explain how to drive the truck to deal with any "incomplete" vehicle monitors.

And don't forget to keep checking the DTCs -- for both new ones and for any that have cleared on their own. Report any changes here.

Lastly, don't forget to use FORScan to check for Mode $06 data (per-cylinder misfires, etc), as we discussed quite a while back.

I still think you can solve these issues. You're on the right track, as far as I can see.
Orca I can't find the tid values. Idk if my obd won't do it or what, I remember seeing them, but can't remember how I got to them. I'll figure it out though. I can pull them with the torque app, but I have no clue on how to read them. I did check the TPS today while it was warming up and did a fuel pressure test again cause I pulled a damper from the junkyard. The TPS read 8% at idle and popped the throttle to 3k it read 49%, so it's good. The fuel pressure was 60psi koeo and dropped to 58psi after 5 min. Psi at koer was a steady 65psi and never changed when engine was revved. All the DTC were the same as before. As far as how the truck runs..... like a washer on spin cycle with 3 pairs of shoes in it.....I was hard for me to keep driving it just to do these tests. I had my daughter with me and when we go back to the house, she instantly said it smells like rotten eggs (I ain't been able to smell shit for a yr now because of C-19) I also will say there was a lot of pinging and popping coming from the exhaust. I only drove this thing for 30 mins. I could also hear a pop almost like a backfire every so often that was not coming from the engine bay. It sounded like it was below the passenger seat. I'm confident my plugs are fouled now but I didn't pull them when I got back home cause work was calling.
 

Orca

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Orca I can't find the tid values. Idk if my obd won't do it or what, I remember seeing them, but can't remember how I got to them.
Your OBD2 scantool will do it. If it can talk to the PCM (and, of course, it can), it can read Mode $06 data. FORScan might disallow it with the engine running, so try it again with engine off if that applies.
I did check the TPS today while it was warming up [...]. The TPS read 8% at idle and popped the throttle to 3k it read 49%, so it's good.
Uncharacteristically, I don't have any data for my Ranger at WOT. But I have tons of past data showing that my idle TPS (engine on or off) is always about 19-20%. Now, I have no idea if a 3.0L engine and a Mazda is the same, TPS-wise, as my Ford 4.0L engine, but I wonder if your throttle cable is slipped. I seem to recall that being a common issue on Rangers. It might also explain why you got an unexpected engine start (if I recall) when you were at WOT. In other words, maybe your injectors were not really leaking. I'd ask @mc17eln to report his TPS value at idle and WOT, if he could. If I get a chance, I'll check mine at WOT too.
 

Shadowridr1

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Your OBD2 scantool will do it. If it can talk to the PCM (and, of course, it can), it can read Mode $06 data. FORScan might disallow it with the engine running, so try it again with engine off if that applies.
Uncharacteristically, I don't have any data for my Ranger at WOT. But I have tons of past data showing that my idle TPS (engine on or off) is always about 19-20%. Now, I have no idea if a 3.0L engine and a Mazda is the same, TPS-wise, as my Ford 4.0L engine, but I wonder if your throttle cable is slipped. I seem to recall that being a common issue on Rangers. It might also explain why you got an unexpected engine start (if I recall) when you were at WOT. In other words, maybe your injectors were not really leaking. I'd ask @mc17eln to report his TPS value at idle and WOT, if he could. If I get a chance, I'll check mine at WOT too.
Yeah sorry. That was 18% not 8
 

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Be sure to read this post of mine (from your earlier thread) about cylinder misfire data from Mode $06. (From the screenshot I had clipped from your video, you clearly had it working in FORScan.) But I also want you to remember to perform a couple of those "60-to-40-mph, no-throttle, no-brake decelerations" at some point when you safely can.
 

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Just for FYI
TPS(throttle sensor) is a 5volt sensor, 0v to 5v, on most vehicles, not just Fords
OBD2 usually show a % and not voltage
With key on and throttle closed the TPS spec is 0.69v to 0.99v, just under 1volt
1 volt is 20% of 5volts :)
So 17% to 19% TPS would be correct for idle, 20% is usually OK as well
WOT is 4.5v, which is 90% of 5volts, so WOT should never be 100%

So TPS should never be 0% or 100%, if it was there would be no way to tell if there was a problem with the sensor
Any sensor has to have a "range" that can be exceeded at either end, low or high, or there would be no way to tell if sensor is having a problem
So codes will often report "sensor high" or sensor low" in the fault code because there is a known "range" that the sensor should be in
 

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@Orca What is TPS in FORScan? I have these:

TPMODE - Throttle Position
TP RATE - Throttle Position Rate
TP_V - Throttle position sensor voltage
TP_F - Throttle position sensor status
TPCT - Lowest Closed Throttle Voltage

Turns out the engine vibration I've been getting during idle is misfire related. My NM (total number of misfire) is slowly adding up - one every 30 to 60+ seconds, but no DTC. I pull all spark plugs yesterday, and they were all in good shape (light brown). I am not able to get FORScan to show which cylinder misfired. Any idea?
 
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Shadowridr1

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@Orca What is TPS in FORScan? I have these:

TPMODE - Throttle Position
TP RATE - Throttle Position Rate
TP_V - Throttle position sensor voltage
TP_F - Throttle position sensor status
TPCT - Lowest Closed Throttle Voltage

Turns out the engine vibration I've been getting during idle is misfire related. My NM (total number of misfire) is slowly adding up - one every 30 to 60+ seconds, but no DTC. I pull all spark plugs yesterday, and they were all in good shape (light brown). I am not able to get FORScan to show which cylinder misfired. Any idea?
I can't get it to show misfire cyl specific either. I've been using total misfire or NM. No CEL. Tps volt will give you a percentage...I think that is what I was using. Hope I haven't passed gremlins on to you man
 


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