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Farm and Garden

ericbphoto

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Mankind is not the problem (for once), nature is. Critters.
Actually, we are part of the problem. I'm not saying we're the whole problem. And I'm not saying we are right or wrong about everything we do.

The human population is much larger than it was several thousand years ago. And, with our growth in numbers, knowledge and technology, we have played a huge part in changing the balance of the whole terrestrial ecosystem. By using natural resources, by covering land with non-organic things like buildings and pavement, which change the way water flows, by hunting certain species or NOT hunting certain species, by transporting plants, animals and insects to and from their native habitats, etc., we have changed things sometimes for better and sometimes for worse. We have interrupted many natural orders. They still work, but the proportions are off. So the results are different than they used to be. It all works together. You can't separate one part of the equation and say "That is the whole problem".

Think about it. Millions of acres of forest land in the US are covered in kudzu. Kudzu is not native to North America and has no natural enemy here. So, it grows rampant and kills many native plants. Changing the numbers of thos native plants changes the habitats for certain animals. So the numbers of those animals changes. As those animal populations change, so does the population of the predators who eat those animals. It's a giant chain reaction. There are many similar cases - non-native fish and reptiles that people have released, like boa constricters in Florida. When you open your eyes to the global "big picture", it is unrealistic to say that humans are not part of the problem.

So, the deer, rabbits, squirrels, raccoons, aphids, Japanese beetles, etc. Are eating our gardens? They are just doing what comes natural. We have given them less forests and wild places to live and feed and we have upset the food chains that keep them in check and bleeding heart softies say "You can't hunt that." So, here we are. Yes, we helped create the problem we complain about.
 
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alwaysFlOoReD

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And capitalism wants ever expanding consumers for profits. That is one of the reasons for government policies encouraging immigration. It's not sustainable in the long term. Sooner than later there will be a reckoning. I probably wont be around to see it as I'm 59, but I feel for my grandkids.
And to be clear, I'm not against immigration. I'm against unfettered capitalism .
 

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Christ..

Smoked one too many left handed cigarettes the other night and started thinking about.. bird feeders.

I'm sure the ecological impact of bird feeders is astronomical.

There's absolutely no way that the population of the types of birds that eat out of them would be as high if there wasn't 46 gallons of free food for them hanging off windows and trees in just about every neighborhood.. in every town.. in every state.. across the whole damn continent.

Super interesting to think about what would happen if we cut them off and made them find their own damn food.

Mabey it wouldn't be a big deal...

But..

Mabey it would be disastrous.
 

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My buddy told me there are wild blueberries in upstate NY and Maine. I asked how they survive birds and pests, he said there is so many that they can all eat/pick/infect and there's still plenty of good ones leftover for humans to pick.
 

ericbphoto

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My buddy told me there are wild blueberries in upstate NY and Maine. I asked how they survive birds and pests, he said there is so many that they can all eat/pick/infect and there's still plenty of good ones leftover for humans to pick.
Wild blueberries are delicious. Not just in those 2 states. When camping, my brother and I would pick a bunch before breakfast and mom would put them in the pancakes.
 

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My buddy told me there are wild blueberries in upstate NY and Maine. I asked how they survive birds and pests, he said there is so many that they can all eat/pick/infect and there's still plenty of good ones leftover for humans to pick.
There was a big bog behind the house I grew up in, and there were wild blueberries all along the edge of it. We went and picked a bucketful and Mom made blueberry muffins and whatnot and they were fantastic. The wild ones really do taste better I think.

The downside was there was also poison ivy everywhere. Wild blueberries were not good enough for me to go through that again.
 

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Found out I have blueberry bushes beside the house, The previous owners here planted a lot of things.
Chickens are getting bigger, had to upgrade the temporary pen from cardboard to a small water trough, the black chickens could hop onto the water canister then out of the old pen if they wanted too. Made me nervous anyways with the cardboard pen and a heat lamp. Not that we leave it on if were not here.
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My buddy told me there are wild blueberries in upstate NY and Maine. I asked how they survive birds and pests, he said there is so many that they can all eat/pick/infect and there's still plenty of good ones leftover for humans to pick.
Wild blueberries, wild strawberries, blackberries, raspberries... even cranberries.. all over the damn place up here.

Birds are actually pretty good at spreading berry-bearing plants around with their little feathered buttholes, too.
 

racsan

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gonna try the asparagus tonight, if nothing else the bacon should still be good.
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ericbphoto

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racsan

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It actually wasnt bad. Heres the raised bed garden with the asparagus. really grows quick & tall. I guess the “picking size” is 6-9 inches. most are way over. seems to be two different types, a purplish and a green. Seemed to taste the same, maybe its all about the bacon.
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85_Ranger4x4

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Christ..

Smoked one too many left handed cigarettes the other night and started thinking about.. bird feeders.

I'm sure the ecological impact of bird feeders is astronomical.

There's absolutely no way that the population of the types of birds that eat out of them would be as high if there wasn't 46 gallons of free food for them hanging off windows and trees in just about every neighborhood.. in every town.. in every state.. across the whole damn continent.

Super interesting to think about what would happen if we cut them off and made them find their own damn food.

Mabey it wouldn't be a big deal...

But..

Mabey it would be disastrous.
Hummingbird feeders are not supposed to be the greatest for them. Mainly they are supposed to buzz around and nab bugs, not drink sugarwater.

Suburban areas are heydays for "wildlife". Raccoons can run amok causing mayhem at will. Deer can pillage all they want.

My parents live on the edge of town. One summer we trapped 36 raccoons in one of dad's buildings. Mom can hardly grow anything outside because the deer will kill it. Hostas, roses, ornamental trees whatever.

I live 7 miles away in the country. I rarely see a deer, wild roses (state flower) grow wild along my road. A huge raspberry bush grows untouched by critters behind my garage. Once in awhile I see a raccoon but they don't bother much. I don't live in a "free zone" where coyotes would rather knock over a trash can than eat a fawn and hunting/trapping actually happens (and so does roadkill with the highway a half mile away)

I don't really have much crop damage from deer, my field isn't really anything special compared to the other thousands of acres of farmland in the state. However a carefully tended garden in town with no predators... now that could have a certain appeal to it.

At my parents house deer are not scared of much, I remember driving my tractor up near a doe and throwing an empty pop bottle at it and hitting it. They are less leery of things than roll than walk, I could easily walk up to bow range but not empty pop bottle chucking range.

Come to think of it I don't think I have ever seen a deer while driving a tractor at my place. They act like deer and light afterburner to exit the county if anything is spooky.

Japanese beetles though... they could go back to wherever they came from in a leaking boat that may or may not sink halfway back. Murderous on soybeans and corn silk and only slightly balanced out by also loving to eat itchweed.
 

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First year ever doing a garden. With with what I had access to, 36" culvert pipe for free. Left height at 3' just for ease of working and keeping small animals out. Backfilled with sand and now topsoil. Added a socker hose in and still need to move a few to the 3rd barrel. We shall see.
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Roert42

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I concur with @85_Ranger4x4 . I have no issue with animals on my property because there are plenty of other places for them to go and live without ever seeing a person. My one neighbor has a massive vegetable garden, never had an issue with animals.

Down the lower part of the county where I work with heavy suburbs. Deer everywhere, there is easily 12 of them that live in the bush behind the shop. They like to hang out in the parking lot at the end of the day because the CFO feeds them.
 

Eddo Rogue

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Hummingbird feeders are not supposed to be the greatest for them. Mainly they are supposed to buzz around and nab bugs, not drink sugarwater.

Suburban areas are heydays for "wildlife". Raccoons can run amok causing mayhem at will. Deer can pillage all they want.

My parents live on the edge of town. One summer we trapped 36 raccoons in one of dad's buildings. Mom can hardly grow anything outside because the deer will kill it. Hostas, roses, ornamental trees whatever.

I live 7 miles away in the country. I rarely see a deer, wild roses (state flower) grow wild along my road. A huge raspberry bush grows untouched by critters behind my garage. Once in awhile I see a raccoon but they don't bother much. I don't live in a "free zone" where coyotes would rather knock over a trash can than eat a fawn and hunting/trapping actually happens (and so does roadkill with the highway a half mile away)

I don't really have much crop damage from deer, my field isn't really anything special compared to the other thousands of acres of farmland in the state. However a carefully tended garden in town with no predators... now that could have a certain appeal to it.

At my parents house deer are not scared of much, I remember driving my tractor up near a doe and throwing an empty pop bottle at it and hitting it. They are less leery of things than roll than walk, I could easily walk up to bow range but not empty pop bottle chucking range.

Come to think of it I don't think I have ever seen a deer while driving a tractor at my place. They act like deer and light afterburner to exit the county if anything is spooky.

Japanese beetles though... they could go back to wherever they came from in a leaking boat that may or may not sink halfway back. Murderous on soybeans and corn silk and only slightly balanced out by also loving to eat itchweed.
That explains it. I am on 3 acres at the edge of town. Cities to the left and right, national forest behind me.
 

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