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Duraspark conversion.

franklin2

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If you truly have a duraspark II ignition setup on your 2.8, it has to be a 1979-down distributor. They did not make duraspark II systems for the 2.8 later than that unless it was made in Canada possibly.

P.S. I looked all the way back to post #79, and see you did not buy the distributor, the previous guy did. So that explains some of the confusion, since if you bought the dist, then you would know what parts to buy. Again, safe to say, you have a later 70's distributor for a pinto or mustang II with a 2.8 engine.
 
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19Walt93

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I haven't ordered anything yet. I'm just trying to help the shop identify what might be wrong by mining the Collective's mind. Everything is solid state except for the distributor pick-up. Even though that's new, it's possible it's failing when it heats up.
Since the older techs didn't want anything to do with them, I was "promoted" to Fairmont vibration diag tech. Fairmonts would be close to a full size car today, bigger than a Fusion, Camry, or Malibu, but they weighed less than a Pinto so they didn't soak up vibrations like a heavier car would. Ford released a driveline vibration manual that said in several places to "substitute a known good part". It also said "new means new, it does not mean good". Every box containing a Chinese part should carry the same warning.
 

Bronco648

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If you truly have a duraspark II ignition setup on your 2.8, it has to be a 1979-down distributor. They did not make duraspark II systems for the 2.8 later than that unless it was made in Canada possibly.

P.S. I looked all the way back to post #79, and see you did not buy the distributor, the previous guy did. So that explains some of the confusion, since if you bought the dist, then you would know what parts to buy. Again, safe to say, you have a later 70's distributor for a pinto or mustang II with a 2.8 engine.
I have a re-man Cardone distributor (part # 30-2691, if memory serves). The LX212 pick-up is for a late 70s Pinto/Mustang II distributor (and looks like the one that's in the distributor in the engine in my Ranger). I also told the shop, that's working on the truck, to treat the engine like a 2.8 out of a late 70s Ford. They're old school and completely understood. They finally got the engine to run poorly and are looking into the issue. I'm on vacation and am hoping they fix it before I get home.
 

Bronco648

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OK, after a nice vacation I returned to discover the shop has found the following:

  1. The short (positive) battery cable gets very hot when cranking (and the starter seems to turn more slowly). The battery is new.
  2. Coil voltage at start-up is ~8V. They think it's supposed to be higher. I do have the external resistor to keep the DS II coil from being cooked.
  3. Brake lights aren't working. I'm guessing this is the brake light switch in the distribution block (below the driver's foot-well, on the frame)?
  4. Turn signal stalk triggers both taillights. And, all running lights are very dim.
  5. The engine (still) starts and runs fine for a short period but then degrades to the point where it dies and will not re-start. I have tried a new ignition module and a new coil. Neither was the solution.
Some of these may be related. Some may not. I do know that the taillight harness had Scotch Locks on it which may mean that some of the wiring may have corroded.
 

RobbieD

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I'd start with new battery cable, and see if number 1 is corrected.

Number 2, adding the resistor should give a coil supply voltage of around 12 volts during crank, and then you should see it drop to around 9 volts in the key run position, if it's wired correctly.

Numbers 3 and 4 are really small potatoes, just wiring, and most likely the scotchloks. Look at your grounds, too.

Number 5, not sure, but I'd look at fuel supply after it dies and won't restart. Rule that out, then go from there.

All that's just off the top of my head. Keep beating on it; you'll get it worked out.
 

Bronco648

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Thanks.
I'd start with new battery cable, and see if number 1 is corrected.
The short battery cable is new (the one from the battery to the starter solenoid). It's a generic from AZ but the gauge appeared to be the same as OE.

Number 2, adding the resistor should give a coil supply voltage of around 12 volts during crank, and then you should see it drop to around 9 volts in the key run position, if it's wired correctly.
Wired correctly? Isn't a resistor a resistor?

Numbers 3 and 4 are really small potatoes, just wiring, and most likely the scotchloks. Look at your grounds, too.
The Scotch Locks are gone and I used electrical tape over the cuts in the insulation. I wonder if I need to cut out those sections.

Number 5, not sure, but I'd look at fuel supply after it dies and won't restart. Rule that out, then go from there.
I have a clear fuel filter on the line before the mechanical fuel pump. I can always see fuel in it. Someone said the float might be jamming.

All that's just off the top of my head. Keep beating on it; you'll get it worked out.
 

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#3: The brake light switch in that block is the brake warning light, it turns on if there’s a loss of fluid/pressure in part of the system. The switch to work the brake lights is on the pedal (quick and inexpensive repair).
 

Bronco648

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#3: The brake light switch in that block is the brake warning light, it turns on if there’s a loss of fluid/pressure in part of the system. The switch to work the brake lights is on the pedal (quick and inexpensive repair).
Yep Andy, you're correct. I was messing with it when I replaced the brake booster. I wonder if it failed or if I didn't get it plugged in correctly.
 

franklin2

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On my Ranger and my Bronco II, on both of them I found the wire that runs from the starter, right underneath the engine, and leads up to the starter relay to be very worn where it's against the engine. I had to add some tape to them both, they were getting ready to come through and short against the oil pan. Maybe yours has started to get through the insulation.

Check your starter solenoid. Does it have two small terminals? If it does, one should be hooked up from the keyswitch to crank the engine. If you have the other one not hooked to anything, you can run a wire from that terminal, around, and hook the other end to the coil + wire. This will give you a full 12v to the coil during cranking only. It sounds like you have your own made up wiring for the ignition, so you have probably lost this feature. It was built into the ignition switch wiring from the factory on factory dsII engines. But if you didn't plug the DSII in exactly like it's supposed to be, then you will not have the starting voltage boost. The extra wire from the starter relay works just as good, though some later starter relays didn't have the extra terminal.
 

Bronco648

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The shop has determined that the "brand new" battery, from Wal-Mart, is in fact 2.5 years old and doesn't hold a charge very well. So, it's going to be returned and I'll get an Interstate or something similar. :mad: I wonder if there isn't a parasitic drain on the battery.

I managed to drive it home from the shop tonight and it seemed to run/drive just fine. It needs an alignment badly and the carb needs some fine tuning. But, it now seems to run OK.

@franklin2 My starter solenoid does not have the two terminals but I know that early Mustang solenoids do. So, if necessary, I can use one of those and run an extra wire to the positive side of the coil. Thanks for that tip.

I do think I need some additional grounds and already have an idea of where to put them.
 

franklin2

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I have been debating doing a little re-wire on my 84 BII.

The alternator is on the pass side, the regulator is on the driver's side. And the charge/output wire also goes from the alternator on the pass side of the engine, across the top of the engine to the driver's side harness, where "tee's" and heads into the interior to power everything, and it also goes back up front, behind the headlights and in front of the radiator, all the way over to the battery + to charge the battery.

I believe they did this because the pass side engine compartment was so full of computer junk over there. I took all that out and now it's empty. I am thinking about moving the regulator over to the pass side. That would eliminate most of those wires running across the top of the engine, except the oil pressure and water temp wires. It would be a shorter distance from the alternator output to the battery +, but it would increase the distance from the interior power components to the alternator, though the distance to the battery would be the same.

I keep thinking about it.
 

Bronco648

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I am thinking about moving the regulator over to the pass side. That would eliminate most of those wires running across the top of the engine, except the oil pressure and water temp wires.
I must have taken a slight different approach when rearranging the wires. You're right, harnesses seem to crisscross all over. I consolidated the wiring from the alternator with the oil pressure and water temperature wires and ran it all on top of the intake manifold, on the driver's side of the carb, to the firewall. IIRC, this is how it's done on early Mustangs.
It would be a shorter distance from the alternator output to the battery +, but it would increase the distance from the interior power components to the alternator, though the distance to the battery would be the same.
I can understand why you keep thinking about it. But, the pros & cons seem to cancel each other.
 

Bronco648

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OK, so, after ditching the Walmart battery that was 3.5 years old (not 2.5, as I thought), the truck starts up easily with a new (11/2022) Diehard. I've also determined that the choke thermostat is shot and am replacing it.

One thing I can't quite figure out is why the truck won't easily re-start when warm. Scenario: I drive the truck several miles in slow traffic in moderate falling snow. Engine is up to temperature and the defroster is keeping up the the snow hitting the windshield. Get to my destination to pick up things for dinner and am inside for 10-15 minutes. Go back out and the engine acts like it's flooded. I need to hold the accelerator pedal to the floor to get it to start. Once running it runs fine and idles nicely at stop lights. Temps are in the mid-teens but the engine compartment should have remained warm (not cold enough to have the t-stat coil close the throttle plate).

What might be causing this re-start condition?
 

franklin2

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When you are driving it around, and you stop somewhere and come out, and you know it's going to do it, pull the aircleaner and see where the choke plate is. If you think it's warm enough to be off and it isn't, get a screw driver and loosen the 3 screws on the round black choke housing and turn the housing till the choke just stands straight up and down. If you find after this adjustment, you do not have enough choke in the morning for a good start, then put it back closer to where it was.

If the choke is straight up and down when you go out to look at it, with the aircleaner off look down the carb throat with a flashlight. If you see fuel dripping into the engine, then your float level in the carb is a little too high.
 

Bronco648

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When you are driving it around, and you stop somewhere and come out, and you know it's going to do it, pull the air cleaner and see where the choke plate is. If you think it's warm enough to be off and it isn't, get a screw driver and loosen the 3 screws on the round black choke housing and turn the housing till the choke just stands straight up and down. If you find after this adjustment, you do not have enough choke in the morning for a good start, then put it back closer to where it was.

If the choke is straight up and down when you go out to look at it, with the air cleaner off look down the carb throat with a flashlight. If you see fuel dripping into the engine, then your float level in the carb is a little too high.
This is a great set of instructions (y) and will do this the next time I'm out. And, if the truck sits for some time, like when I'm at work, the 'flooded' issue won't occur (extra fuel evaporates during the day). So, I'm thinking that the float level needs adjusting. But, I know the choke t-stat spring is weak and will replace it (when it arrives). That will eliminate one of the possible causes.
 

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