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Duraspark conversion.

Bronco648

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I was able to pop the passenger side valve cover and verify that oil is getting up into the rockers. That made me feel a little better.
 


19Walt93

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I was able to pop the passenger side valve cover and verify that oil is getting up into the rockers. That made me feel a little better.
I'd consider it primed and move on because everything is getting lubricated, it's just not building enough pressure cranking to register.
 

Bronco648

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I'd consider it primed and move on because everything is getting lubricated, it's just not building enough pressure cranking to register.
That was my thought. At this point it doesn't seem like pulling the distributor to spin the oil pump was going to do much more. I have verification that oil is circulating and that's what I was after. Now, I just need to get rid of the last few gallons of old gas and I can try to start it.

A question about the 2150 carb; it has the fuel bowl vent on the top. Should that be plumbed into the air cleaner?
 

19Walt93

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If the bowl vent is a nipple on the bowl I'd cap it and make sure the bowl vent under the air cleaner isn't blocked.
 

Bronco648

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If the bowl vent is a nipple on the bowl I'd cap it and make sure the bowl vent under the air cleaner isn't blocked.
Sorry Walt, you lost me. My 2150 looks like this:

2150.jpg


The vent in question is circled in red. Does that need to be connected to the air cleaner?
 

franklin2

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That vent circled in red was originally attached to a solenoid and then it ran down to the charcoal canister.

You can leave it open and try it, and then you can plug it and try it. On some vehicles I have noticed if I plug it, it makes it a little harder to start on a hot day, but all vehicles are a little different.

You can think of that port doing the same thing as those new aggravating fuel cans they have now. Those new cans do not let any gas fumes escape from the can until you mess with the buttons and are getting ready to pour the gasoline out of the gas can.

That port is part of the "evap" system and gas fumes from the carb are routed to the charcoal canister where they are stored there, along with your gas tank fumes which are sealed, and the gas tank has it's own breather line running up the frame to the charcoal canister.

The charcoal canister stores all these fumes and then when you start your engine and conditions are right, they had another line called the "purge" line which let the engine suck these stored fumes out of the canister and into the engine to be burned.
 

19Walt93

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Sorry Walt, you lost me. My 2150 looks like this:

View attachment 82748

The vent in question is circled in red. Does that need to be connected to the air cleaner?
The 2 vertical tubes just in front of the choke plate are vents, if you pull the top and look you'll probably find them open. If not, puncture the gasket so they are open and cap the nipple to keep dirt out.
 

Bronco648

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Tire Size
14"
That vent circled in red was originally attached to a solenoid and then it ran down to the charcoal canister.

You can leave it open and try it, and then you can plug it and try it. On some vehicles I have noticed if I plug it, it makes it a little harder to start on a hot day, but all vehicles are a little different.

You can think of that port doing the same thing as those new aggravating fuel cans they have now. Those new cans do not let any gas fumes escape from the can until you mess with the buttons and are getting ready to pour the gasoline out of the gas can.

That port is part of the "evap" system and gas fumes from the carb are routed to the charcoal canister where they are stored there, along with your gas tank fumes which are sealed, and the gas tank has it's own breather line running up the frame to the charcoal canister.

The charcoal canister stores all these fumes and then when you start your engine and conditions are right, they had another line called the "purge" line which let the engine suck these stored fumes out of the canister and into the engine to be burned.
So, what's everyone doing with the semi-hard line that runs from the gas tank to the canister? My canister is gone and the end of the semi-hard line is just sitting below the washer fluid / overflow tank.
The 2 vertical tubes just in front of the choke plate are vents, if you pull the top and look you'll probably find them open. If not, puncture the gasket so they are open and cap the nipple to keep dirt out.
The gasket was not open so I punctured it and I capped the vent nipple.
 

franklin2

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Are these the “vents” you capped?
No. Don't mess with anything inside the carb like that. You can cap that port like you did and try it.

On the hard line from the tank, I just leave it open. You will experience a gas smell once in awhile from it. I still have mine hooked to the charcoal canister, but I am sure the canister is saturated and giving off a gas smell once in awhile. I may hook a vacuum line to it one day to let it purge automatically with a small orifice in the line.
 

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