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Did i get screwed?

rusty ol ranger

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3.0, but I've heard it's got all the power of the 2.9, right? (And fuel mileage of the 4.0)
On paper. Lol. The 2.9 runs considerably harder then the 3.0s ive driven. Atleast seat of your pants 0-60
 


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lil_Blue_Ford

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On paper. Lol. The 2.9 runs considerably harder then the 3.0s ive driven. Atleast seat of your pants 0-60
They are pretty similar, IMHO. 2.9 makes its torque low and 3.0 prefers higher RPMs. Run them where they make the most power and there’s little difference even between those and the 4.0, but the 4.0 makes more power than both. I ran my choptop on 35s with a 2.9 and it pulled hard until you hit 4th, then it fell flat on its face. When I say hard, I do mean it would chirp the tires and go. But after third it just ran out of oomf. 4.0 gave it a hard pull all the way up into 5th. Acceleration is little different, there’s just more of it. Run a 3.0 between 3-5k rpm and you might be surprised too. Always thought a lowered 3.0 manual with a supercharger or turbo would be a lot of fun but it doesn’t seem to have the support that the 4.0 had for that sort of thing. Still, I have one here that needs some work so perhaps someday…
 

James Morse

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When I got mine it got titled 'not actual mileage' which usually means an older vehicle with 5 digits so you can't tell if it turned past 100k or not, and whoever titled it was honest enough to say, it's not actual. What happened with mine was that when the dealer got it, the seller wrote the mileage wrong then tried to correct it by writing over it, thus, DMV immediately put 'not actual mileage' for that reason, on the dealer's title. And here's the funny thing, it was titled as having 188k miles and 'not actual' but in fact it has -less- than that, it has 183k miles, which I documented by photo - for whatever that's worth. Basically it falls under 'I don't care', for me. Kind of makes you wonder about the whole 'not actual' thing, because if they put 2 miles or 200k miles, it wouldn't matter because not actual means you don't know wtf it is. In my case, the VIN searches do show enough mileage entries so between that and photo doc I could make a solid case that I know what the mileage really is - it's what the odo says. But once not actual gets put on the title, it stays with it forever. At least here. Just another case of them doing things that make no sense at all.
 
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fred m

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Did the PCM do and inferred mileage calculation and store it in the PCM back then?
As a PSA to anybody reading this thread wondering about possible odometer fraud on Rangers (or any Ford of that era), while yes, the PCM does have an independent mileage value stored on the 2004-11 trucks, it can be altered very easily so seeing that value is not a guarantee of actual mileage.

Certain high-level diagnostic tools can write the odometers on our trucks via OBD in seconds. Using the right software, will take care of both the odometer display on the dash and the mileage in the PCM. Someone with a simple EEPROM programmer can program the chip in the cluster directly, and that will not change the mileage in the PCM. But with how cheap the Russian and Polish programmers (and Chinese clones) are becoming, this is getting less and less common.

Odometer fraud is a real thing and is much more common than most people realize. I started getting into auto programming a while back as a hobby, but with the lack of “professionals” in my area word has gotten around quickly and people call me with requests all the time. I don’t touch odometers, but lots and lots of people do. And just because a car is 10 or 20 years old doesn’t necessarily mean somebody won’t spin it, especially in this crazy market.
 

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