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2.3L ('83-'97) Carburetor swap

TexasDuck66

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I have never had a weber carb. I did do some research on it, was seriously thinking about getting one, though they are kind of expensive. But as I did more research, I was a little overwhelmed with the tuning like the other poster was.



If you are talking about a weber carb, it's more to it than that. A weber carb is designed to fit on any type of engine. So everything is adjustable. EVERYTHING. You have all these idle air bleeds that are replaceable, all sorts of different orifices and jets for idle, main, and then you have all that for the secondary side. Not saying you could not do it, it's done all the time. But the learning curve would be a little steep and take some commitment and time.
I bought a non Weber branded 32/36 off of Ebay. I'll share you the link, it comes in a kit and I'd say for the price was worth it. Hopefully it's not a piece of shit and was a waste of money. Does make me a little nervous putting one on I've been told from other people that they're pretty much plug in and play for 2.3Ls, especially jetting size. Also talked to some MGB guys since their motors are a little smaller than ours and they run twin 32/36s.

Here's the carburetor I bought.
 


bilbo

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Franklin2 nailed it. It was one of the attempts to improve emissions. The O2 sensor signal controlled the solenoid, giving a crude closed-loop fuel control.

The Weber carb is widely used in Europe and there is a lot of info on tuning on the internet. Franklin2 is also correct about the adjustability. There are air jets (they call them air correctors), emulsion tubes that operate on dark magic that nobody seems to understand, main fuel jets, idle fuel jets, idle air corrector orifice (pressed in, not easily changed), and I'm probably missing other adjustment points. You can't change more than one thing at a time or you'll just chase your tail forever, so it gets time consuming changing an item, then testing, then repeat.

There's a unique procedure to setting up idle that is detailed in manuals and forums on the internet. Beyond that there isn't a ton of guidelines for tuning. I found a website, I think it was for a company that does tuning in Europe, that kind of laid out the trial and error process and order that things should be dialed in but I can't find it at the moment. Different components of the fuel/air controls in the carb have larger or smaller effects on final AFR depending on throttle position and engine speed.

The carb, timing curve, PCV, and engine characteristics all interact to give overall performance. I used a wideband O2 and vacuum gauge to help with tuning. Sometimes things outside of the carb present like problems with the carb. I chased my tail with a tip-in stumble for a long time until I finally figured out it had to do with the PCV. The PCV opened just before the carb started to draw enough fuel. Adding enough fuel or removing air caused it to be too rich in other areas. Tuning so cruise and accel AFR was where I wanted it made the stumble worse. If I removed the PCV from the intake, I could tune out the stumble. I didn't want to lose the PCV, however, and experimented with a few different PCV valves until I found one that worked well enough and that's when I called it good. I eventually got tired of taking the air horn of repeatedly to change jets and air correctors.

Maybe the actual bona fide Weber would work better, but I was able to get my Holley copy for $20 plus a $50 rebuild kit so it was a lot less invested. A proper intake would also probably help a lot. There's quite a bit of restriction as the adapter goes from 2 to 1 barrel.
 

19Walt93

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I'd rather keep the YFA than use a mickey mouse adapter.
 

superj

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they are more expensive than holley, carter, or any of the others i looked at. and run at a very low fuel pressure so that usually messes some people up because they blow off that number but mine have always run best at around 3.5 psi. the holleys always run good at around 9
 

franklin2

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I bought a non Weber branded 32/36 off of Ebay. I'll share you the link, it comes in a kit and I'd say for the price was worth it. Hopefully it's not a piece of shit and was a waste of money. Does make me a little nervous putting one on I've been told from other people that they're pretty much plug in and play for 2.3Ls, especially jetting size. Also talked to some MGB guys since their motors are a little smaller than ours and they run twin 32/36s.

Here's the carburetor I bought.
That looks like a good price and the progressive part should work good. Be prepared to work with it a little bit since it's a knock-off. My 2100 knock-off had a few little problems that I had to address. Like the top bowl gasket wasn't cut exactly right and seeped fuel. The power valve didn't act right and the accelerator pump got changed, I forgot why now. But those good used parts came from the old feedback carb I took off. It's been running good since. It's just like stuff from Harbor Freight; They give you something to work with, and a little tweak here and there and it can be good.
 

superj

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knock of webers are usually bad so i hope you have zero trouble.

usually accelerator pumps on carbs are changed because of hesitation when pushing the pedal from a stop. if its off while rolling, most people generally don't notice the pump being misadjusted or bad but from a stop, they feel it because it takes a second or three for the engine to accelerate and usually stalls it since there is no momentum on the drive line keeping the engine going. webers don't have power valves. i didn't know what that was on my first holley because previously i had only worked on webers and vw carbs
 

TexasDuck66

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they are more expensive than holley, carter, or any of the others i looked at. and run at a very low fuel pressure so that usually messes some people up because they blow off that number but mine have always run best at around 3.5 psi. the holleys always run good at around 9
What's the stock fuel pressure rating for a 83' Ranger 2.3L then? I'm gonna presume I will have to get a fuel pressure regulator for the Weber Carb.
 

superj

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ranger edge
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3 liters of tire smoking power
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2WD
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none
Total Drop
none
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235s
My credo
Grew up in the 70s, 80s, and 90s
I have no idea but I bet you do have to get a regulator. Google seems to say it's 5-7 psa though
 

19Walt93

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235/55R16
My credo
If you don't have time to do it right will you have time to do it over?
they are more expensive than holley, carter, or any of the others i looked at. and run at a very low fuel pressure so that usually messes some people up because they blow off that number but mine have always run best at around 3.5 psi. the holleys always run good at around 9
9 psi is more than I'd run with any carb, 3-5 is enough.
 

bilbo

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Total Lift
0
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My Holley copy has a power valve. Apparently it’s one of the things that commonly go bad. I forgot about the accelerator pump. That’s another adjustment, there are different nozzles that hit one or both barrels, and different nozzle sizes. There are also three holes that change the fulcrum for the lever that actuates it, changing the amount of fuel delivered. And if I remember right there are different throttle shafts available with many different cam profiles for the accelerator pump.
 

franklin2

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All carbs for automotive use have some sort of power system inside. May not be the diaphragm style that Holley and Motorcraft used, could be a plunger or some other sort of valving. I am not familiar with the Weber and what it uses, but it has something in there.
 

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