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2.3L ('83-'97) Carburetor swap

superj

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And if you want a pcv, those are good but they hook to the intake
 


TexasDuck66

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And if you want a pcv, those are good but they hook to the intake
PCV Valve is OK, I got a free Mustang ll intake that has oval ports. I got circle intake ports on my 2.3 since it's a Ranger. The bolt holes line up but would it be safe to run oval ports on a circle port engine?
 

franklin2

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I consider the PCV valve essential. It keeps the oil cleaner inside the engine, helping it last longer. It also keeps that stinky smell from getting into the engine compartment making a oily mess, and the smell always makes it into the passenger compartment.

You will sometimes get a gas smell also, since your gas tank is vented to the charcoal canister. Don't cap the line off running down the frame to the gas tank, or you may find yourself sitting along side the road with a non-running truck. Or a truck that seems flooded on a hot day. That line lets the fuel tank breath. They didn't want those gas fumes in the atmosphere, so they put them in the charcoal canister, and then they had a system to purge the canister and let the engine burn it. Each one of those vacuum lines has a job to do. It's good to know what you are taking off, even though you are not going to put it back on.
 

TexasDuck66

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I consider the PCV valve essential. It keeps the oil cleaner inside the engine, helping it last longer. It also keeps that stinky smell from getting into the engine compartment making a oily mess, and the smell always makes it into the passenger compartment.

You will sometimes get a gas smell also, since your gas tank is vented to the charcoal canister. Don't cap the line off running down the frame to the gas tank, or you may find yourself sitting along side the road with a non-running truck. Or a truck that seems flooded on a hot day. That line lets the fuel tank breath. They didn't want those gas fumes in the atmosphere, so they put them in the charcoal canister, and then they had a system to purge the canister and let the engine burn it. Each one of those vacuum lines has a job to do. It's good to know what you are taking off, even though you are not going to put it back on.
I really appreciate it the help. I didn't not know that. I thought the breather for the gas tank was built into the lid. The more you know. I just ordered a Weber 32/36 for my truck today so weekend after next I'm gonna put it on.
 

franklin2

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Most gas caps will let air in if there is a vacuum on the tank. But they will not let air out. Caps on the old vehicles in the 60's and earlier did have tank caps that would let air in and out of the tank.

The got hold of the cars and trucks first, and then a few years ago they got hold of the gas cans you use for your lawnmowers. That is why they all went to that spout that is such a pain to use and won't hardly flow any fuel out.
 

TexasDuck66

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Most gas caps will let air in if there is a vacuum on the tank. But they will not let air out. Caps on the old vehicles in the 60's and earlier did have tank caps that would let air in and out of the tank.

The got hold of the cars and trucks first, and then a few years ago they got hold of the gas cans you use for your lawnmowers. That is why they all went to that spout that is such a pain to use and won't hardly flow any fuel out.
And if you want a pcv, those are good but they hook to the intake
Do you know if a Weber 32/36 would give me better fuel economy over the Carter YFA? I don't really care about power, not building this motor for it. Most I'll do is put long tube headers and a exhaust.
 

bilbo

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I had a worn out YFA with feedback and swapped in a Holley 5200, which is a licensed copy of the 32/36. They were used on many cars in the 70's, including the Pinto and I believe Mustang/Mustang II, which are also 2.3. It's been a process getting everything dialed in. It took a lot of playing around and tuning. I was able to get about the same fuel economy I had with the YFA, but it could be better with more tuning. That's supposed to be a major advantage of the 32/36. I'm just tired of messing with it. Driveability is somewhat better. It had a nasty lean spot just off idle with the YFA that has got much better. I think it has to do with the PCV system, but again I'm tired of messing with it and it works well enough to drive so I'm leaving it alone.

I ended up using an adapter for the YFA manifold from Trans-Dapt to fit the carb. I had to modify the throttle cable bracket as the carb sat higher. You'll also need a different air cleaner as the top of the carb is football shaped. These carbs are used on VWs a lot I guess so there's a rectangular air cleaner & plate available for them. I used that for a while and then found an air cleaner housing from a Pinto and fitted that.

To be honest, if I could do it all over again I would probably just buy one of the non-feedback YFAs. I think it would have been a lot less messing around.
 

TexasDuck66

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I had a worn out YFA with feedback and swapped in a Holley 5200, which is a licensed copy of the 32/36. They were used on many cars in the 70's, including the Pinto and I believe Mustang/Mustang II, which are also 2.3. It's been a process getting everything dialed in. It took a lot of playing around and tuning. I was able to get about the same fuel economy I had with the YFA, but it could be better with more tuning. That's supposed to be a major advantage of the 32/36. I'm just tired of messing with it. Driveability is somewhat better. It had a nasty lean spot just off idle with the YFA that has got much better. I think it has to do with the PCV system, but again I'm tired of messing with it and it works well enough to drive so I'm leaving it alone.

I ended up using an adapter for the YFA manifold from Trans-Dapt to fit the carb. I had to modify the throttle cable bracket as the carb sat higher. You'll also need a different air cleaner as the top of the carb is football shaped. These carbs are used on VWs a lot I guess so there's a rectangular air cleaner & plate available for them. I used that for a while and then found an air cleaner housing from a Pinto and fitted that.

To be honest, if I could do it all over again I would probably just buy one of the non-feedback YFAs. I think it would have been a lot less messing around.
Doesn't sound too bad, do you know the jetting size you used for your 32/36 Weber? I have a Mustang ll intake that supposedly can fit on my ranger despite having oval intake ports while my ranger has circle. I don't think it'll hurt it, I hope not but I'm in a facebook group with some dirt track guys who specialize in the 2.3L Lima and I've had several of them tell me it was ok to run it.

I'd say I'm a lot more experienced now than I was then when I first got this truck. I'm confident I could get this carburetor dialed in using a vacuum gauge, timing light, and a Lambda AFR gauge.
 

bilbo

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I had some notes on jetting somewhere, I'll see if I can find them.
 

TexasDuck66

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I had some notes on jetting somewhere, I'll see if I can find them.
Is a Weber 32/36 a feedback carb or no? I don't have an ICM on the distributor of my truck, I do not see one anyway, just a vacuum advance.
 

bilbo

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No feedback on the 32/36. Mine didn't have the computer controlled ignition but it did have the feedback carb originally.
 

TexasDuck66

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No feedback on the 32/36. Mine didn't have the computer controlled ignition but it did have the feedback carb originally.
What exactly is the pros of a feedback carb over a non feedback?
 

superj

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i can't help with that, i don't know what a feedback carb is, unless it means one of those that are partially electronic?

try to find a weber that is not a copy. get one from redline weber or a reputable seller.

you don't need the timing light if you are using a vacuum gage. the vacuum gage will tell you where to put the timing so its right for your engine.
 

franklin2

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Feedback carb is the closest thing you can get as far as fuel control without going to fuel injection. A feedback system has all the sensors and components of a fuel injected engine, along with the ECM, but it has a carb instead of injectors. It even has the oxygen sensor. It was their last ditch effort to get their cars and trucks to pass EPA guidelines with a carb.

With the feedback carb, they put large jets in it, and make it run on the rich side. They then have a solenoid that controls air bypass passages so they can lean out the mixture according to the oxygen sensor and the other sensors. The solenoid makes a continuous clicking noise when the engine is running.

I ran a feedback carb without a computer on my 2.8. I ran it for about a year like that and it ran fine, but I could not get much over 15-16mpg out of it. I then went on Amazon and bought one of those chinese knock-off 2100 carbs, and even though it was slightly larger in the venturi than the stock feedback carb, mileage jumped up to almost 20 mpg.
 

franklin2

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I have never had a weber carb. I did do some research on it, was seriously thinking about getting one, though they are kind of expensive. But as I did more research, I was a little overwhelmed with the tuning like the other poster was.

I'm confident I could get this carburetor dialed in using a vacuum gauge, timing light, and a Lambda AFR gauge.
If you are talking about a weber carb, it's more to it than that. A weber carb is designed to fit on any type of engine. So everything is adjustable. EVERYTHING. You have all these idle air bleeds that are replaceable, all sorts of different orifices and jets for idle, main, and then you have all that for the secondary side. Not saying you could not do it, it's done all the time. But the learning curve would be a little steep and take some commitment and time.
 

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