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Boxing In The Frame

planeflyer21

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Has anyone fully boxed in their Ranger frame?

If so what are the advantages and disadvantages?

Thanks!

Jon
 


RonD

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C frame is more likely to break in extreme flexing, i.e. off road "challenges"
Boxed frame weighs more, but has less flex so less likely to break in extreme "challenges"

In a Ranger your more likely to break axles and suspension parts before C frame would break.
But if you are upgrading suspension and axles then boxing the frame would be a good idea.
Attaching parts to a boxed frame brings a new set of issues
With C frame you are just bolting to a "plate", horizontal or vertical, its still just a steel plate.

With boxed you can go thru the rail using longer bolts but there is limited torquing because you will start to deflect the rail.
You can add holes to get nuts and bolts thru to the opposite side "plate", hole needs to be large enough for socket wrench.
Or leave some areas open, as C rail, where attachment points are needed, if its not too big of an area you will still get the strength of the boxed frame but have access to the attachment points.
Or you can weld on attachment points

Limited flex can make for a better ride and more predictable ride over bumpy terrain
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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You could also add access holes where needed and using a dimple die it will be as strong and slightly lighter. I've seen home made dimple die made with a trailer ball and bearing race.
 

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I've seen many cracked boxed frames (both OEM and end-user-boxed)... I think overall design of the frame plays a bigger role in durability than whether it is boxed or c-channel.

I've not seen many frame problems on RBVs... Unless like mentioned above, you're slinging a set of 1-tons & 42s under there, I probably wouldn't worry much about the frame.

Bad body mount bushings will allow the frame to flex more than normal, if this is an issue (such as the bed touching the cab under flex), I'd look at replacing the body bushings. Urethane will allow the least amount of flex, but will increase noise & vibration transmitted into the cab a slight bit.
 

Will

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Hard spots are what cause breakage. I've owned a couple plow trucks and the frames on those break. They break where differences in stiffness come together--hard spots. On trucks with leaf springs on the front, the frames break right after the rear leaf mounts are bolted to the frame. The leaf mounts stiffen the frame and past that it is a C-channel. The stress focuses in the area where the stiffness of the frame changes. So if you want to box it, box all of it. A full c-channel frame can endure a lot of flex if you don't modify any of it.
 

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