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Basic 2x4 framing question(s)

dvdswan

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lil_Blue_Ford

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It’s gotten bad around here about building, in a little township on the country and they check the satellite once a year and run drones around looking for stuff several times a year. A shed 100 square foot or less doesn’t require a permit but you have to submit a drawing of where it is on the property. Anything else requires a permit. Build without approval and you’ll have the code enforcement guy breathing down your neck in short order. At best, it’s get a permit. At worst, it’s a fine and tear it down. And he is not, at all, a friendly guy. Huge attitude problem.

That said, anchoring to the existing slab should be fine, you don’t have frost heave to worry about. I would probably put a pressure treated board down with urethane sealant and anchored to the slab with concrete anchors helps keep rot away from the regular framing lumber. You will have to leave this out of any door openings. Standard framing is 16” on center but if you do the rafters for the roof, you really should have a stud directly under each rafter, or frame the rafters on 16” centers like the wall. Load bearing walls (the long one that your rafters will land on) must have headers over window and door openings and the size is based on how wide and roof load. End walls don’t usually need that requirement, but I prefer to do it anyway. A garage door opening in an end wall would require a header.

Using the correct rafter tie to join to the existing garage is fine, but not necessary if you’re tying in to the existing roof. You may need ties though for joining things if earthquake or tornado is a thing. No need to use a post to join walls. The way things get framed solve that. You certainly could build the long wall as two sections.
 

4x4prepper

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I would not attach anything to the house or garage. Find out the local code for the maximum sq ft for an additional structure NOT attached to the house. In my county it is 950 sq ft.

I would make it a free standing structure, six-12 inches from the house, of course a PICTURE would have helped. If you have a brick wall on the existing structure, put in a metal 1/4" plate header before cutting the brick.

Put the vertical posts on sonar tubes, attached, but, not directly on the concrete, 12" above grade. Once those are in pour a 4" pad. As for spans the general rule of thumb is you can span an area equal to a double up dimension 2x lumber. (2) 2x6 nailed (not screwed) together can span 6 feet, (2) 2x8 can span 8 feet etc. Double (cripple king) 2x4 headers over windows and doors and down the sides. I would use PT 2x4 for teh sill or pour concrete and cover in metal. Personally I would lag the 2x4 walls to the concrete pad and have the roof structure (truss) and columns supporting it independent of the enclosing walls. That way you can always take out a wall for expansion or easily replace it when you accidentally drive a truck through it. Plus, you can always remove the walls and call it a carport. You need insulation or a barrier between the sill and concrete, not really required in a dry area or garage, but, in most areas code requires it.

Also, this depends on what your soil is like. Most places can support a minimum (shear) of 2000# sq ft, so, when figuring load per column, figure the whole structure AND the concrete in the tube. I think an 8 inch tube holds 300# of concrete and provides 900 pounds of support with 2000# of shear, so, that leaves you with 600# of support on that column.

If you dig and pour actually footers for the columns, says 16wx16Lx 12T four feet down, use mesh and #3or#4 rebar in a 8" (x48") sonartube, then you can get away using 6x6 support posts and doubled up 2x8s connecting them. Once you build basically a carport, you can go back , go down a few inches, and then pour a 4" pad.
 

Eddo Rogue

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would it be easier to just expand my garage? Its a basic wooden stick frame built on the end of a double wide mobile home. I dont think theres anything more than a 4"slab under it.
 

4x4prepper

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> would it be easier to just expand my garage? Its a basic wooden stick frame built

It is like asking where is the best place to put a winch on my steel bumper, without posting pictures of the bumper, and everything attached to it. Location location location.

Pictures of the front, side, and back of the garage would be more useful then a 10,000 word description of the same.

1985-b2-20220630-bumper.jpg
 

Eddo Rogue

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> would it be easier to just expand my garage? Its a basic wooden stick frame built

It is like asking where is the best place to put a winch on my steel bumper, without posting pictures of the bumper, and everything attached to it. Location location location.

Pictures of the front, side, and back of the garage would be more useful then a 10,000 word description of the same.

View attachment 79199
I see. Interesting mount location btw.
 

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