• Welcome Visitor! Please take a few seconds and Register for our forum. Even if you don't want to post, you can still 'Like' and react to posts.

Am I crazy? Or is there something wrong with my steering?

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
I have a 97 Ranger 4.0l OHV it has skyjacker front springs on it I am assuming it is lifted but there is still a lot of slant to the truck. My steering however is all over the place I have had it aligned and all checked out good. When I am driving however I am constantly having to make small corrections you truly have to work to drive the truck is this normal? I am also running a 31x10.50 tire if that makes any difference at all
 


RonD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2012
Messages
22,087
Reaction score
5,388
Points
113
Location
canada
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Manual
Your drive Chevys and herd Fords

So yes a little play in Ford steering is expected, always been that way, but could be your steering box is getting worn out
 

alwaysFlOoReD

Forum Staff Member
Forum Moderator
TRS Banner 2012-2015
TRS 20th Anniversary
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
3,114
Points
113
Location
Calgary, Canada
Vehicle Year
'91, '80, '06
Make / Model
Ford, GMC,Dodge
Engine Size
4.0,4.0,5.7
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Last edited:

4x4junkie

Forum Staff Member
Forum Moderator
TRS 20th Anniversary
Joined
Aug 19, 2001
Messages
10,589
Reaction score
375
Points
83
Location
So. Calif (SFV)
Vehicle Year
1990
Make / Model
Bronco II
Engine Type
2.9 V6
Engine Size
2.9L V6
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Tire Size
35x12.50R15
Yeah this is not normal.

Three possibilities most likely:

1.
Your steering gear box has too much slack in it.

2.
Your steering column rag joint has given up the ghost.

3.
Your steering linkage is not matched with your lift (subject matter in the link AlwaysFloored posted).


If #1 turns out to be the case, there is a meshload adjuster on the top of the steering box that might help to take up the slack, but if the box is very worn, this won't remove the slack entirely (in which case you'll need to replace it).
WARNING: Do not overtighten the adjuster, otherwise you'll bind up the box which (at best) can damage the box, or (at worst) cause you to lose control of the truck and lead to a collision.
Best way to make sure the box doesn't bind is to disconnect the steering linkage from the pitman arm... Loosen the jam nut and then tighten the inner screw just enough until you feel it bind slightly right as you rotate the steering across center, then back it off just enough to relieve the bind, and retighten the jam nut.

There should be some past threads on this subject if you put in the term "Meshload" into the forum's Search box.
 

kimcrwbr1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Messages
6,044
Reaction score
43
Points
48
Location
maplevalley WA
Vehicle Year
1983
Make / Model
ford
Engine Size
2.8l
Transmission
Automatic
Last edited:

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
Yeah this is not normal.

Three possibilities most likely:

1.
Your steering gear box has too much slack in it.

2.
Your steering column rag joint has given up the ghost.

3.
Your steering linkage is not matched with your lift (subject matter in the link AlwaysFloored posted).


If #1 turns out to be the case, there is a meshload adjuster on the top of the steering box that might help to take up the slack, but if the box is very worn, this won't remove the slack entirely (in which case you'll need to replace it).
WARNING: Do not overtighten the adjuster, otherwise you'll bind up the box which (at best) can damage the box, or (at worst) cause you to lose control of the truck and lead to a collision.
Best way to make sure the box doesn't bind is to disconnect the steering linkage from the pitman arm... Loosen the jam nut and then tighten the inner screw just enough until you feel it bind slightly right as you rotate the steering across center, then back it off just enough to relieve the bind, and retighten the jam nut.

There should be some past threads on this subject if you put in the term "Meshload" into the forum's Search box.

Number 1&2 I feel could be the problem possibly when I had it aligned it took very little to get it in straight the cams are a 2 1/2 degree. At best the lift only gave me 2" unfortunately I can't remember what it drove like before i did the lift.

Is there a definitive way to tell if my steering box is bad? I've adjusted it as per what I've read on here and nothing changes it.

What is and where is the rag joint?
 

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
Yeah this is not normal.

Three possibilities most likely:

1.
Your steering gear box has too much slack in it.

2.
Your steering column rag joint has given up the ghost.

3.
Your steering linkage is not matched with your lift (subject matter in the link AlwaysFloored posted).


If #1 turns out to be the case, there is a meshload adjuster on the top of the steering box that might help to take up the slack, but if the box is very worn, this won't remove the slack entirely (in which case you'll need to replace it).
WARNING: Do not overtighten the adjuster, otherwise you'll bind up the box which (at best) can damage the box, or (at worst) cause you to lose control of the truck and lead to a collision.
Best way to make sure the box doesn't bind is to disconnect the steering linkage from the pitman arm... Loosen the jam nut and then tighten the inner screw just enough until you feel it bind slightly right as you rotate the steering across center, then back it off just enough to relieve the bind, and retighten the jam nut.

There should be some past threads on this subject if you put in the term "Meshload" into the forum's Search box.
The ttb and tib front suspensions are really touchy if you lift without using all the proper brackets. Check the stickies at the top of the appropriate forum, there is some good info there.

http://www.therangerstation.com/Magazine/winter2008/steering_tech.htm

Even with the 2" you think I'd need brackets or longer radius arms?
 

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
What about radius arm bushings or any other bushings that could cause this? The truck has 199,000 miles in sure stuff is wore out.
 

bobbywalter

TRS Technical Staff
V8 Engine Swap
TRS Technical Advisor
TRS Banner 2012-2015
TRS 20th Anniversary
TRS Event Participant
Joined
Aug 9, 2007
Messages
22,145
Reaction score
2,665
Points
113
Location
woodhaven mi
Vehicle Year
1988
Make / Model
FORD mostly
Engine Type
V8
Engine Size
BIGGER
Transmission
Automatic
2WD / 4WD
4WD
Total Lift
sawzall?
Tire Size
33-44
My credo
it is easier to fix and understand than "her"
depending if the beams are over or under center, depends on what toe bias i use. over i toe out, under i toe in.


the radius arm bushings will do this as well.

and when lifted, i prefer heavier then specified caster....so just because it is within spec does not mean you will have optimal results with drive-ability.
 

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
depending if the beams are over or under center, depends on what toe bias i use. over i toe out, under i toe in.


the radius arm bushings will do this as well.

and when lifted, i prefer heavier then specified caster....so just because it is within spec does not mean you will have optimal results with drive-ability.

I'll talk to the guys who did the alignment on the truck and have them look at the radius arm bushings.
 

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
depending if the beams are over or under center, depends on what toe bias i use. over i toe out, under i toe in.


the radius arm bushings will do this as well.

and when lifted, i prefer heavier then specified caster....so just because it is within spec does not mean you will have optimal results with drive-ability.
Wow that's some good info I had a 3.5 degree on it before they swapped them out
 

alwaysFlOoReD

Forum Staff Member
Forum Moderator
TRS Banner 2012-2015
TRS 20th Anniversary
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
3,114
Points
113
Location
Calgary, Canada
Vehicle Year
'91, '80, '06
Make / Model
Ford, GMC,Dodge
Engine Size
4.0,4.0,5.7
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
4WD
The rag joint is what connects the steering box to the shaft of the steering column. Get under the hood and have someone turn the steering wheel slowly back and forth while you look at the shaft and pitman arm. They should turn at exactly the same time. If not then you can narrow it down by finding where the discrepancy is, the rag joint or the steering box, or both.

Sent from my XT1032 using Tapatalk
 

cw40342

New Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
Messages
41
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Vehicle Year
1997
Make / Model
Ford
Transmission
Automatic
The rag joint is what connects the steering box to the shaft of the steering column. Get under the hood and have someone turn the steering wheel slowly back and forth while you look at the shaft and pitman arm. They should turn at exactly the same time. If not then you can narrow it down by finding where the discrepancy is, the rag joint or the steering box, or both.

Sent from my XT1032 using Tapatalk

Sweet I'll get someone to one help and see if that's what's going on with it it would be nice to get this sorted driving me crazy!
 

Sponsored Ad


Sponsored Ad

Top