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Air volume, Electric turbo???

00dangerranger

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great stuff. So if i go a real turbo, since i'm driving a 1994 4.0 would i need a seperate computer to control everything, mtr,turbo,timing,etc. it seems everything i read says you can't tune this eec much and I havent found a CA shop close by that programs them. What about the $900 ebay kit junk or good starting point?
 


Gotta_gofast

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If your air to fuel ratio is optimal and your timing doesn't advance enough to cause detonation, you should be able to run 5-6 lbs of boost without touching the engine's rotating assembly.

As for getting the correct amount of fuel into the engine while using the stock computer, there's a variety of tricks ranging from expensive and involving to cheap and risky. I've heard of everything from larger injectors and recalibrating the MAF sensor to purchasing a mega-squirt or sniper system.
 

anupaum

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Oh my! Shouldn't we have a "hair dryer" sticky in this forum? Get a turbo! You'll be far happier!
 

BowTech99

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Ebay kit, no. Junk.

50hp dry shot, no. You'll be filling bottles constantly. and 50hp will leave you craving more.

Just do a remote mount turbo set-up. Bigger injectors an such, and have it tuned. Look into SCT, thats who i use and i swear by them
 

Sevensecondsuv

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...My question is? is there a converstion from foot lbs of thrust to Boost psi.?...
Well thrust is a function of air flow rate, air velocity, and enthalpy.

The relationship (what you're refering to as "conversion") between flow rate and boost (output pressure) would be given on the pump curve for the fan you reference. However, given that said fan is design to produce thrust on a model air plane, I highly doubt the manufacturer bothered having the testing done to establish a pump curve.

Without analyzing this idea, I have to go with my gut feeling that it's no where big enough and won't work. :icon_thumby:
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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Well thrust is a function of air flow rate, air velocity, and enthalpy.

The relationship (what you're refering to as "conversion") between flow rate and boost (output pressure) would be given on the pump curve for the fan you reference. However, given that said fan is design to produce thrust on a model air plane, I highly doubt the manufacturer bothered having the testing done to establish a pump curve.

Without analyzing this idea, I have to go with my gut feeling that it's no where big enough and won't work. :icon_thumby:
I googled enthalpy but I need the explanation dumbed down for me:dunno:
Thanks,
Richard
 

Sevensecondsuv

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Enthalpy is basically the internal energy of the fluid (in this case air) being moved by the fan.

If you can get your hands a fluid mechanics textbook it should have all the thrust equations somewhere near the end. Of course, you'll probably have to read the rest of the book to understand them...
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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Enthalpy is basically the internal energy of the fluid (in this case air) being moved by the fan.

If you can get your hands a fluid mechanics textbook it should have all the thrust equations somewhere near the end. Of course, you'll probably have to read the rest of the book to understand them...
Thanks for the quick reply. I think I'd have to read more than just the one book:D. Too many projects, not enough time:sad:
Richard
 

cammeddrz

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look up sts (squire turbo systems) for a more cost-effective approach
 

feellnfroggy

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So I saw somewhere in here the question, what is the CFM intake of an OHV 4.0. I didnt see an answer, Im not sure of the CFM however all motors run at 1 bar which is 17.4 lbs-ft of air. THis is normal atmospheric pressure I believe.
 

feellnfroggy

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If your air to fuel ratio is optimal and your timing doesn't advance enough to cause detonation, you should be able to run 5-6 lbs of boost without touching the engine's rotating assembly.

As for getting the correct amount of fuel into the engine while using the stock computer, there's a variety of tricks ranging from expensive and involving to cheap and risky. I've heard of everything from larger injectors and recalibrating the MAF sensor to purchasing a mega-squirt or sniper system.
If using the high grade octane he should be able to run upwards of 8-9 lbs of boost without messing with the stock internals. He will need a programmer to regualter air/fuel. But wont be too difficult, and he can Use the Maf sensor of a 5.0 mustang for the increased range of greater airflow.

Also he can add a SNOperformance water/meth system and the it will be a dramatically increased source of pretection from detonation. Theres not alot of supercharger/ turbo charger fans on our site, I would read up on some of the mustang sites for your turbo knowledge. Especially Mustangworld.com We have so many directions we focus on iwth 4 wheeling and engine swaps and mods but they focus only on goign faster most of them.
 

Sevensecondsuv

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So I saw somewhere in here the question, what is the CFM intake of an OHV 4.0. I didnt see an answer, Im not sure of the CFM however all motors run at 1 bar which is 17.4 lbs-ft of air. THis is normal atmospheric pressure I believe.
Ah.... you've got that a little mixed up...

First off, ft-lbs are the wrong units for pressure. Pressure is force per area.

Atmospheric pressure (at sea level) is equal to:

14.7 psia (pounds per square inch absolute)
0.0 psig (pounds per square inch gauge)
1.0 bara (bar absolute)
0.0 barg (bar gauge)
1.0 atma (atmosphere absolute)
0.0 atmg (atmosphere gauge)
101325 Paa (pascals absolute)
0.0 Pag (pascals gauge)
101.325 kPaa (kilo-pascals absolute)
0.0 kPag (kilo-pascals gauge)
101325 Newtons per square meter absolute
0.0 Newtons per square meter gauge

etc
etc
etc

The things you wind end up memorizing in engineering school :shok: :icon_confused:
 

Will

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And that was a weird response, though I'm, sure he transposed the 4 and the 7.

Atmospheric pressure and the volumetric efficiency of an engine are seperate issues.
 

Yellowsplash

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Dont forget...
760 mmHg (Torr)
29.92 inHg

And figuring out what amount of boost an engine "should" be able to handle is not something that can calculated via some internet calculator. Detonation is what kills engines, not "boost".

Fuel, air fuel ratio, timing, combustion chamber design, piston design, turbo size, intercooler size and efficiency, atmospheric conditions such as air temp, elevation, all factor in...

Atmospheric pressure is 14.7 psi at sea level and is considered absolute zero when considering positive boost. All others held constant, a vehicle in Denver CO will experience much less atmospheric pressure and will run alot worse than a vehicle crusing around the beach at sea level.
 
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