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A/C System questions

rumblecloud

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When I replaced the heads on my 4.0, I pulled the compressor and the lines to get at the heads. Near as I can remember, I didn't plug the Orificeseseses. So...does that mean the system needs to be evac'd and I need to replace the Evap., condensor, orifice tube, etc., etc?
And is there a way to test the compressor? I've read here that you can jump the compressor. Is that as simple as running a jumper to the ...where? It isn't cycling now and adding 134a would prolly be a waste.

I'm gearing up for this job next and Rock has a complete set fro under $300, so it isn't as bad as what I thought it might be. I just need to confirm the numbers/type of compressor I have - which is gonna be a little difficult since the label looks to be unreadable.

Thanks for any advice. I've been in the tech section and there are two really good references there.

Thanks
r
 


85_Ranger4x4

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Break it down and replace all the orings, a kit is cheap.

So is a new orifice tube.

Probably best to put a new drier in it too. Then flush everything out, add oil as recommended and evac/recharge.
 

RumPunch

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If the system was working before the only thing that should NEED replacement after opening the system to air(moisture) are the orings and the receiver dryer, although not a bad time to replace shrader valve and pressure switches since system is open. As far as "testing" the compressor, yes if there is oil and freon in it(did it lay upside down etc with ports open, drip any fluid out etc etc when removed?) I would not jump battery voltage to it until there is oil/freon in the system. Once necessary parts are replaced reconnected then you need to pull a vacuum on the system and verify hold for 5-15 minutes. All manufacturers state different times. Just make sure it isn't leaking. If it is a can of freon with dye is often your cheapest and fastest route to find the leak. If all is ok the. At this point both high and low side valves should still be closed and a vacuum present in the system. This will help pull at least a can of freon in usually some times 2. Then I'd feel safe jumping the compressor and finish filling low side to spec.
 

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O-rings... accumulator... office tube... flush everything. Great time to inspect the rest... bent/smashed fins on condenser... oily residue at connections... etc. You can actually test the compressor by just jumping power and ground to the compressor clutch coil... drive belt removed... and ensure clutch engages. You can also rotate compressor by hand at this point and ensure compressor turns free and doesn't "feel" rough or binding.

Adding oil is tricky... you don't want to add to much. Did you lose any when the compressor was removed? You can also remove the compressor... drain the oil... and add new oil to spec. You should also add the specified amount of oil to the new accumulator.

The system will need to be evactuated... pulled under vacuum. This will remove air and boil out any moisture in there. If it holds vacuum... fill the system to spec.
 

Eddo Rogue

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I resurrected my ac a few years ago. Got one summer out if it, then my cheapo compressor crapped out. Replaced it with a better quality unit, but forgot to change the accumulator/orifice tube the second time around. Now it works, but doesn't blow very cold like it did before. I would replace everything. I will be going back through mine again for next summer.
 

rumblecloud

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When you all did yours, I assume you did the work yourself....How difficult was it? Did you borrow the tools or buy them?

It doesn't look to be that difficult, just time consuming. I'm inclined to do the work myself because it's something I would like to learn about, but the other option is installing all the components and then taking it to a shop to have them do the rest. I'm sure the cost will make me change my mind plus I won't know the quality of the work they did.
 

Shran

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I did replaced the entire system in both my stepside truck and the 92 Explorer. Truck was easy and vacuumed down fine the first try and it's still working two years later. Explorer was a pain in the ass, it worked fine before but the condenser was half folded over/plugged up and causing air flow issues. I tried to cheap out and replace bits and pieces and fought leaks, ended up replacing everything. Working fine now.

If everything goes according to plan all you really need is a vacuum pump, manifold gauge set and either a can tap or one of those cheapo filler hoses that screws onto a can. That's what I use, it has a very basic gauge that shows low side pressure so you can keep an eye on that. I don't charge through the manifold although most people probably do. As far as the vacuum pump goes, the one that Horrible Freight sells that hooks up to your air compressor is an excellent budget option, it's like $25.

As far as oil goes, Gump is right that it is tricky. Your compressor will not hold the full oil charge so you should pour some in the accumulator as well. Then if you vacuum it multiple times you may find that the oil has migrated elsewhere! I did that and it pulled most of the oil out of the compressor to who knows where and when I discovered that the compressor was bad, I had to guess how much oil to add to it. Sometimes you can spin the thing for hours and nothing will come out, then it just magically appears days later. I have heard from a couple mechanics I trust that you can go way over on oil in Ford systems without any ill effects but I would try to avoid that if possible.
 

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You should do the work yourself... nothing to hard about it. Some shops might squawk about it being repaired (it's gravy money) already... but you could probably find a place to evacuate the system and charge it up. Ask some buddies if they have the tools they could loan. A HVAC friend would be ideal. You might even be able to rent from the parts store or rental company.

You could also just pick up a couple A/C tools and have them in your tool box. I haven't had much luck with a couple of the air operated vacuum pumps I've used... perhaps having my own Robinair pump spoiled me a little. I'm sure they have gotten better... they are inexpensive in comparison. Just remember they take considerable air to operate... or at least that's what I remember.
 

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Ha, they do require a lot of air. My 60 gallon compressor runs constantly when using it. I do have a really nice JB Industries 7cfm vacuum pump but sometimes I just want to pull a quick vacuum without putting oil in the JB. Both have their place I think.
 

rumblecloud

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You should do the work yourself... nothing to hard about it. Some shops might squawk about it being repaired (it's gravy money) already... but you could probably find a place to evacuate the system and charge it up. Ask some buddies if they have the tools they could loan. A HVAC friend would be ideal. You might even be able to rent from the parts store or rental company.
When I started this whole charade by pulling the heads, I had no knowledge of what I was doing -. so thanks to a lot of help from you folks, a couple of years later and a steering gear, ball joints, shocks, springs, cruise control, etc, etc, later, I still don't know what I'm doing but it was a lot of fun. This AC thing won't be any different.

I've checked around with the local AZ and they do offer the tools needed to do the job, but I love tools and I would have to justify the extra cost. HF offers a manifold set for 134a for about $65 and a pomp for about $125. RA has an AC kit with most of the goodies for around $300-something. It doesn't include the hoses but those are available locally.

To quote Jon Snow, "Winter is coming."

I think I'm gonna have to sneak up on this one :p

I'll keep posting progress here.
 

rumblecloud

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A couple of questions:
On Rock Auto, in looking through the compressor offerings, they go through a lot of effort explaining that:
"Certain vehicles came with multiple compressor styles. You can only replace your current compressor with the same style compressor. "
On AutoZone, they offer no such warning even though both sites say this part fits your vehicle.
Why is that?

Crap...I forgot the other question :unsure: ...ohhh

Other than some sort of tag or stamp on the compressor (neither of which I can find), how do I ID my compressor?

Thanks
r

EDIT: I did find this on the casing:


Compressor Label.png
If you look close it has an FS 10 designation. Would that be the ID -- I'm hoping
 
Last edited:

Eddo Rogue

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When you all did yours, I assume you did the work yourself....How difficult was it? Did you borrow the tools or buy them?

It doesn't look to be that difficult, just time consuming. I'm inclined to do the work myself because it's something I would like to learn about, but the other option is installing all the components and then taking it to a shop to have them do the rest. I'm sure the cost will make me change my mind plus I won't know the quality of the work they did.
I had an ace up my sleeve in the form of an hvac buddy. He had a badass vacuum pump, which I think made the difference. Also he had the gauges and tanks, did all teh freon stuff for me. Also he had a nitrogen tank and pressure tested it first. Besides that I did it with all basic tools. I got the thingy for the ac disconnects, thats about it.

It actually wasn't that hard, more patience than challenge.
 

rumblecloud

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Most Condensers I see for replacement are much like a radiator in appearance in that they are thin, flat and look kinda large.
Mine is quite the opposite: thick and looks to be about half the size of the replacements I see.

I can explain away the size differences by the way the lines are run (single rows vs double rows). But I can't figure out what differences it may make in installation.

Then again, I could be totally mistaking this thing as my Condenser when it is actually something else altogether:

20220824_175200.jpg

The black thingy on the left
 

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rumblecloud

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What's the worst that could happen?
Well duh. Guess I don't need to replace that, then (smh)
 

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