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94 Oil Pan Gasket.


Darascal101

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U.S. Military - Veteran
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Location
Walker, LA
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Ford Ranger 3.0
Engine Type
3.0 V6
Transmission
Automatic
2WD / 4WD
2WD
My credo
If I can't do it...find someone to teach me
So I have fallen into a never ending rabbit hole while tracking down a/some coolant leaks. I found that the timing cover was leaking so I broke the front of the engine down started cleaning things up only to realize the oil pan gasket is WAY beyond saving. I live in an apartment complex so removing the engine or/and transmission is not a option. Has anyone successfully replace the oil pan with the engine still in the truck? If so how? Any help is appreciated. I thought using Mega Black would be a good option but after reinstalling the timing cover quickly realized that wasn't going to work. Specks are 1992 2wd 3.0 147818 miles. Also I am wondering if anyone can confirm the number of bolts in the timing cover to the block
 


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Deiimos

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Ohio
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2001
Make / Model
Ford Ranger XLT
Engine Type
3.0 V6
Transmission
Automatic
2WD / 4WD
2WD
Take what I post as not properly done, nor recommended, just what I did.

Mine is a 2001, not sure what differences that may have, or if this is even possible for that year.

I wasn’t able to pull the engine and needed my oil pan gasket swapped (developed a bad leak, bad enough I could not drive it). I unbolted the engine from the two engine mounts, unbolted the transmission at it's crossmember (two bolts or nuts easy to get to), then jacked up the engine as high as I could get it without destroying anything (block of wood between the jack and transmission closer to the engine side of it). This gave me a few inches tilting the pan slightly, but not enough to get the pan out. What I ended up doing was removing the old gasket best I could (I think it came out mostly in one piece so was not a big problem for me, but I may have cut it to aid in removal and minimize any chunks falling into the pan), then sneaking a flexible gasket in and under the oil pickup tube, then on to the oil pan. So I stuck the gasket down into the pan and snuck it under the oil pickup, then fished it up onto the pan flange, this wasn’t easy. Note there is hardly any room to do this, and be mindful of gasket orientation. Once there I bolted it up. The point is I did not remove the engine, or transmission, they remained bolted together, just lifted up a bit. And yes I put some wood blocks under the engine mounts so it didn’t come down on my hands / arms, never trust the jack!).

When jacking it up keep an eye everywhere to not pinch / smash anything (this was a few years ago and I don't recall every detail, I was in a hurry to get it done, and also watch the power steering hoses, as I recall one popped off as I was jacking which made a mess and slowed the entire process cleaning up. Again I don't recall what all or anything else I had to disconnect, wasn't much, but keep that in mind so you don't cause more problems / damage.

Not easy at all and getting the gasket seated under the timing cover was a real pain and I never could get it perfect in the front, stuck out a little bit, but it didn’t leak. Not sure if this is much less work than removing trans and lifting engine, but I didn't have anything to lift an engine accept floor jacks, so this was the route I took. I was prepared to go buy an engine hoist of some sort if I had to though.

I did this a few years ago separate from the timing cover and it’s been holding.

Yes I know this is not the proper way to do it, I can't even recommend attempting it, but when you need the truck and minimal equipment for pulling an engine and the job is too expensive to pay someone else… This took me many hours though. Hopefully others with more experience offer their input. If I had to do it again I would seriously consider pulling the engine to actually get the pan out, but I guess my mindset is it didn't hurt to give it a try to sneak the gasket in, and if need be, I'd go buy the engine hoist to have done it more proper.

If you can pay someone to do it, that might be your best option, maybe have it towed somewhere or perhaps find a mobile mechanic.
 

Guanfy

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Location
Crawfordville, Florida
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Mazda B3000
Engine Type
3.0 V6
Transmission
Manual
2WD / 4WD
2WD
Total Lift
Stock
Total Drop
Stock
Tire Size
15in
+1 for what Deiimos did. I did the same to fix a pan gasket leak. If you remove the engine mounts from the frame you can get just enough lift that you can move the pan around, but not get it out. Cut the old gasket so you can slide it out. The new improved one should be metal core so it's bendable and a bit flexible. Carefully thread the gasket around the oil pan, being careful around the oil pickup and the baffle plate and you can get it in position. It is an enormous pain in the ass, but it does avoid an engine out. The correct way to do this is an engine out.
 

Sid_from_Rowlett

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Texas
Vehicle Year
1994
Make / Model
Mazda B3000
Transmission
Manual
So I have fallen into a never ending rabbit hole while tracking down a/some coolant leaks. I found that the timing cover was leaking so I broke the front of the engine down started cleaning things up only to realize the oil pan gasket is WAY beyond saving. I live in an apartment complex so removing the engine or/and transmission is not a option. Has anyone successfully replace the oil pan with the engine still in the truck? If so how? Any help is appreciated. I thought using Mega Black would be a good option but after reinstalling the timing cover quickly realized that wasn't going to work. Specks are 1992 2wd 3.0 147818 miles. Also I am wondering if anyone can confirm the number of bolts in the timing cover to the block
On a 3.0, I've used a hoist (from the top) to support the motor while removing the motor mounts and loosening the tranny mount. I recommend draining your radiator and disconnecting the upper and lower hoses. I have an electric rad fan, but if you have a mechanical fan, pull back the shroud. You'll get a few inches of clearance, enough to drop the pan and pull it away. If you've ever suspected your oil pump is weak, this is a great opportunity to replace it. Overall, a dirty job, have fun.
 


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