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86 2.0 duraspark/asian carb question

RangerDange

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Hey guys, so I have been doing a lot of research but would like some confirmation. So I have an 86 ranger with a duraspark ignition and stock asian carb. I'm currently in the process of replacing all the front oil seals, valve cover and oil pan gasket. Since I basically have the truck torn apart I would like to clean it up a bit. Basically I want to remove all the vacuum lines and unnecessary wires.

My plan is to keep the EGR only and vacuum for distributor timing advance. Also plan on disconnecting the idle valve on the bottom of the carb. I have no brake booster so don't need a vacuum line there. Would that basically be all I need?

After researching carb swaps I am concerned that the truck wont run right with the idle control disconnected. Will I be able to tune it to run ok? Will it affect the operation of the electric choke? I will be doing a 2 bbl carb swap in the future but would rather hold off right now if I can get the truck to run well with the asian carb without idle control connected.

Also, does anyone know where I can get an adapter plate for my intake if I do decide to get a different carb? I'm thinking ill go with the weber.
 


RangerDange

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Ok so I found a weber 32/36 carb and intake combo online for $180 which I think ill pick up on saturday. I figure that way I will have an easier time deleting vacuum lines and wires. Is this a decent deal? Ill post pics of them after I pick them up. Does anyone know if ill be able to keep the EGR system with an aftermarket intake and carb?

In the mean time here is a picture of my truck and the engine tear down so far. I'm waiting on the gasket kit to get here on Wednesday before I attempt to remove the oil pan. If anyone has advise on removing the pan that would be great.






here is a crappy pic of the intake and carb I will be replacing
 

JamesD

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Running a carter 1b on my 86 Ranger bought a sealed rebuilt one online for $140.) Still in the paint progress so I really don't know what the performance will be? Anyway I have had experience with the weber 32/36. Weber makes some great carburetors. Although they are usually set up to run without emissions. Also if not jetted right they can have some issues setting up right out of the box. Unless you hit about 4500 rpms only one of the weber's barrels open the second one opens at higher rpms. The 38/38 open at the same time giving more HP. Of course this is with a fine tuned and modified engine.

The weber will keep the engine running all day long. You might have to lower the fuel psi a bit.
 

JamesD

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Oh, BTW if you want to part with some of your A/C guts? Please let me know my ranger has dealer installed A/C parts. Hard to find replacement parts for it. I would like to get my A/C working again.
 

RangerDange

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yea I saw they are rated for like 3psi so I might get a pressure regulator.

And what AC parts? Im pretty much ok with getting rid of everything ac related.
 

Mark_88

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Nice little Ranger...on the outside...lol

That engine reminds me of my first 2.0 Ranger...and I can understand your wanting to dump the carb/intake. I thought you were posting pics of the new carb and intake but I know what they look like so...

I too would dump the A/C and PS if you have it...put in a manual steering gearbox since those Rangers don't need much power to steer them...Armstrong Steering is better...:)

If you were closer I have an intake and carb plus an alternator that I just bought new before I blew the engine...and some advice...make sure those bracket bolts stay tight because those brackets can snap and they are getting harder to find...

Anyway...keep us posted as to how the new carb and intake work out...the Weber is OK...and definitely less vac lines...not sure if you will see any HP improvements unless you are doing head work too...a nice cam and some porting can go a long way to wake those engines up...
 

RangerDange

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I haven't updated in a few weeks...sorry. I decided to pull the motor because it seemed easiest to replace the oil pan gasket that way. Right now I have my new manifold and carb bolted in place and I replaced all the front seals, rear main, oil pan gasket, valve cover gasket, rear trans seal, Pinion seal, timing belt and clutch. Figured if im pulling the motor might as well go all out.

I'm not going to pull the head because I don't plan on doing any head work. I did have to torch the bottom exhaust manifold bolts pretty good to get them off:icon_welder: and ended up braking the flange on my manifold removing one them:dunno:
So right now I'm waiting for my new header to get here.

Here are some pics for you guys. Ill have more later this weekend with better details.

Here is my motor and trans After I made the decision to pull it.
 

RangerDange

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Mark_88 I might dump the AC I haven't decided yet. I don't have ps which is nice and thanks for the heads up on the alternator bracket, I used it as a place the attach the chain when I removed the motor ooops. I will deff be more careful with that so I don't break it.
 

Mark_88

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Mark_88 I might dump the AC I haven't decided yet. I don't have ps which is nice and thanks for the heads up on the alternator bracket, I used it as a place the attach the chain when I removed the motor ooops. I will deff be more careful with that so I don't break it.
Good pics...that one shows the yellow arrow pointing to the engine on the left...that is an air pump on that side...I think...

Yes, lol, careful if it is on the driver/intake side the bracket may be a bit different (stronger) on the 2.3 but not meant for that type of force.

Thanks for the update though...nice looking intake...similar to mine but not exactly...that front opening is for the water passage...do you have the parts to seal that off? You could use a plate to block it off but there is an inlet for the coolant to flow through the intake to keep it cooler...helps with fuel economy.

Good work though...worth the effort and the head can be done at any time later if you want to pep it up a bit...just a few hours to pull and replace.
 

tomw

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The coolant flowed through the intake is generally to heat up the manifold to help fuel evaporate and mix with the incoming air. If you want 'cold driveability', and live in a cold climate, you might want to reconsider blocking the coolant passages as it will affect fuel economy in the wrong way if not put to use. The hose setup on my old truck has a small diameter tube T-ed into the heater core hoses, leading around the back of the cylinder head, and plumbed into the base of the intake. I *think* there's a passage from the intake coolant area that connects to the block coolant passages to allow through flow from the heater hose connection. I have never investigated further, so ???
tom

I just went back & looked at the pic of the new manifold. It has a 'chamber' for coolant, the squareish hole on the side below the carb base mount point. Should be a plate that bolts on, with a fitting for a hose to attach so the chamber can be filled with coolant. You can see that the coolant would contact the bottom of the intake, and thus help fuel evap & mix, and avoid fuel 'pooling' in the bottom of the intake. At least that's what I think it is designed to do. The manifold source should have the proper parts to connect.
 
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RangerDange

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So I got every thing pretty much finished. I ended up tracing the gasket for the coolant chamber on the back of the manifold onto a piece of sheet metal and cut it out. I just sandwiched that with a new gasket between the chamber and manifold to block it off.

I still need to get a fuel pressure regulator for the weber. I was looking at the mr gasket regulator on amazon but it had mixed reviews. I think ill end up buying a holley one unless you guys have a better option:icon_confused: The holley requires buying fittings separate which is kinda a bummer.

This was just before I glued the valve cover on for good. You can see where the chamber on the back of the intake is, the one I blocked off. You can also see where the timing belt cover plug was supposed to go before I broke it out:yahoo:

All back together with the clutch installed.

new header:icon_thumby:
The hose wraped around the front is to remind me to install the pcv and block off the heater hose that was running into the intake.
 

Mark_88

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Good job!

Are you using a stock fuel pump or something else? I bought a low pressure electric fuel pump because the block I put in didn't have a hole for the manual pump. The one I bought was rated at 4-7 psi so it was perfect for a carb application.

Bought it at a NAPA parts store for $50 and it lasted for five years...which was better than some of the manual pumps lasted. I actually still have a new manual pump sitting in my storage bin that I never used...probably still works and I salvaged the electric pump from my old engine...figured I could use it for something...still works great.
 

tomw

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The fuel pump on a 74 Pinto 2.3 should bolt in place ... and was designed to be used together with the Holley/Weber. No regulator needed. I think.
Nice looking truck. I think I would have considered going with a complete swap of engine & control systems from a 2.3 with EFI rather than doing the carb stuff.
FWIW, back when, a Pinto with 4-speed, and a 2.3 would get maybe 23mpg on a good day. Topped out at 26, even with its more aero design than a Ranger pickup. I can get 25-26 easily, and if I paid a bit more attention, could do better. I can get higher - 27-29 on the highway, going the same speed as the Pinto went... In short, if there was EFI and 5-speeds for Pinto, they would have gotten over 30 mpg... with a Holley/Weber, not happening. Siblings, as I remember, sure had a herd of Pintos... Mustangs and Capris.
tom
 

RangerDange

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My original plan was to use the stock mechanical pump and a pressure regulator because the weber only needs like 2-3.5 lbs. But a lower pressure pump is always an option. Tomw I agree EFI would be better for both economy and power but I really like my slow 2.0 Its been reliable and its simple.

Next time I pull it out will probably be for a rebuild. For now, I'm curious to see how long she can survive.
 

Mark_88

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Typically, according to the last mechanic I talked to about this, the needle in the carbs (all carbs according to him) can work up to 5 PSI of pressure...over that you are pushing the limits of the design. If you are certain the carb you are using will only handle that pressure then a regulator would be needed even with the stock pump.

Not sure what the stock mechanical pump puts out but it is more in tune with what the carbs will work with.

I've only blown out the needle once on my Motorcraft 5200 carb and that was mostly due to my tinkering with the float bowl level...setting it too high...or it may just have fallen out because of the way I put it back together...

If you've worked on these before then you would be aware of precautions needed to ensure a good fit...and not destroy things...like not turning the air/fuel mixture screws too hard at full in because you will destroy the fit...and all that.

I'm sure others could give you pointers on that if you need them...I often did things before reading (or watching youtube) resulting in a few damaged parts...lol

There is actually a very good rebuild video on Youtube for carburetors...I watched it a few years ago and was really impressed with the details the guy went through...I can't find the link and I'm sure I saved it...but easy to find...it was only a half hour video but there were others.
 

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