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80's Ranger 4x4 for the Trails


eightynine4x4

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Inner fender should come out fairly easily, I have at least one of mine out once a year minimum. A couple screws to hold the fender to the inner fender and then a couple bolts to mount the plastic inner fender to the inner support structure of the front clip. Things can mount on it from above (you have an air filter over there etc) and I don't know how they mount on your era of truck.
Yeah I’m figuring at least one thing is mounted through the top but hopefully that’s not a headache.
I’m grabbing a new manifold soon but before that will attempt to do the six deadly bolts. I have a feeling this will be beneficial to the cabin exhaust odors/fumes in the end. But I am not excited about these bolts.
 


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eightynine4x4

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i made a bunch of these flanges out of 3/8" stainless steel. i can ship one to whoever wants one.
After reinstalling the old one and now having some lack of confidence in it, I’d appreciate picking one up off you! I’m not sure if 3/8” is exact size as old one but I have had quite the struggle getting it into proper flush placement around the pipe since the oil filter mount is rubbing right up against the flange on far side. It sits a bit wonky, not perfectly. I have some exhaust squeaking out right at that spot now but am concerned about tightening it down too tight and somehow bending the Y pipe end due to imperfect flange placement. Let me know if a set it still available! I only need it for one side of the truck.
thanks!
 

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eightynine4x4

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I’m trying to suss out a fuel leak since the engine startup is labored and I think the fuel pressure may be low. New filter, so maybe there’s a crack in a line or near the tank. I can once in a while smell a bit of fuel by drivers side, in particular after the truck was sitting for a bit after driving.
But in the midst of searching I noticed some completely cut line of some sort. Anyone know what this is?

59265
 

Roert42

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I’m trying to suss out a fuel leak since the engine startup is labored and I think the fuel pressure may be low. New filter, so maybe there’s a crack in a line or near the tank. I can once in a while smell a bit of fuel by drivers side, in particular after the truck was sitting for a bit after driving.
But in the midst of searching I noticed some completely cut line of some sort. Anyone know what this is?

View attachment 59265

Looks like someone spliced two pieces of brake lines together. Probably needed to replace part of it, without replacing the whole thing. The pipe on the left looks like copper nickle alloy brake line, and the one on the right looks like regular steel brake line.
 

eightynine4x4

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Looks like someone spliced two pieces of brake lines together. Probably needed to replace part of it, without replacing the whole thing. The pipe on the left looks like copper nickle alloy brake line, and the one on the right looks like regular steel brake line.
Thanks! Hhmmm. I’ll have to look into that.
But I was referring to the black hose above it that looks completely cut and dangling...
Parking brake?
 

Roert42

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Thanks! Hhmmm. I’ll have to look into that.
But I was referring to the black hose above it that looks completely cut and dangling...
Parking brake?
I wouldn't worry about the brake line.

The black tube could be the axle breather tube?
 

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I wouldn't worry about the brake line.

The black tube could be the axle breather tube?
If there is fuel lines near it it is not the factory one, it basically just clips on the frame above the rear axle.

My t-case vent clipped in with the shift linkage from the factory.

If you are smelling fuel check out the fuel tank venting, there should be a small hard plastic line running upfront to the charcoal canister.
 

eightynine4x4

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If there is fuel lines near it it is not the factory one, it basically just clips on the frame above the rear axle.

My t-case vent clipped in with the shift linkage from the factory.

If you are smelling fuel check out the fuel tank venting, there should be a small hard plastic line running upfront to the charcoal canister.
Approximately where does the venting line meet the tank? Hard to find it. Maybe I need to lift the bed off again and this’ll be easy. I’ll be doing this soon to do some more body work anyways. Bolts are fresh.

And would a leak in that vent line impact the fuel pressure ?
My rough guess here is that once the engine is running the amount of leak doesn’t have an impact much yet and also that after the engine is stopped and sits for a while the pressure dissipates too much for a normal startup which is why cycling the key to ACCS to run the pump a few times seems to help generate the pressure again.
 

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On top of the tank, mine is kind of in the middle towards the back IIRC. Different generations and cab/bed configurations though.
 

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I’m trying to suss out a fuel leak since the engine startup is labored and I think the fuel pressure may be low. New filter, so maybe there’s a crack in a line or near the tank. I can once in a while smell a bit of fuel by drivers side, in particular after the truck was sitting for a bit after driving.
But in the midst of searching I noticed some completely cut line of some sort. Anyone know what this is?

View attachment 59265
I'm not sure where the rubber hose goes... this is a comment on the brake line.

The compression fitting used to connect the brake lines should be considered an emergency temporary fix and not a permanent one. You won't find any service manual directing you to repair a brake line this way. The correct way would be to flare the lines and use a union.

Those compression fittings can fail... probably when you need the brakes the most.

Be safe out there...
 

eightynine4x4

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I'm not sure where the rubber hose goes... this is a comment on the brake line.

The compression fitting used to connect the brake lines should be considered an emergency temporary fix and not a permanent one. You won't find any service manual directing you to repair a brake line this way. The correct way would be to flare the lines and use a union.

Those compression fittings can fail... probably when you need the brakes the most.

Be safe out there...
THANK YOU.
I will pick up a flaring kit and get to work. Probably will keep the truck parked until that's finished. I would never have noticed this or thought to question it since i've never worked on brake lines. Is it likely that this was a leak spot that someone patched? Or maybe they ran a whole new line but connected it the easy way. I should check out the rest of the lines and see if anything else has this type of connector.

Gonna get to work on the startup as well. Yesterday, upon paying attention to this, the fuel pump actually didn't fire up with the key the first go, then it worked the second and third times. So maybe it's the pump about to fail, or maybe it's the relay/control of the pump. Will be properly cleaning the electrical contacts inside spark plug connectors just to eliminate that. Already changed the plugs recently and should have done it then. When i did the manifold, i did pull one there just out of precaution and it looked healthy to me so that's good. The factor that confuses me the most is that i'm smelling a LOT of fuel smell when the starter has to spin for a few seconds before the engine turns over. To me that means unburnt fueled, meaning the fuel isn't the issue and that the engine isn't getting spark strongly to kick in. But other signs point to it being a fuel delivery issue, such as the faint smell of fuel once in a while near the drivers side when the truck is off. It could be both issues, naturally.

Here's something else i've been thinking about... a gradual engine flush. I don't want to hit the engine hard with a full dose engine flush such as liqui moly, since it could plug up the oil pump/screen with actual chunks of debris. However, i also don't want to completely ignore the idea of flushing the engine. I did an oil change recently, then a couple weeks later (maybe a hundred miles of local driving) i drained some out to make space for an additive, and that oil that i drained out was JET black sludge. It's amazing the engine is performing as well as it is, considering how thick it is inside. I'm wondering if there is a compromise, such as draining fully, then adding some super cheap oil and a 1/4 dose of flush additive, doing the procedure, draining, then doing that all over again literally 4 times in a row, then adding a good batch of oil for keeps. Maybe this will reduce the chances of plugging something up? I've also considered just ignoring additive completely and doing 3 or 4 oil changes rapidly, such as within the span of two weeks. I just don't know if that's a total waste of time and oil, and if the blackness will remain just as bad in the end and a solvent is needed to do this. Another idea would be using Shell Rotella-T 15-40 and doing a couple rapid changes. I think that oil supposedly helps to clean things a little bit?
 


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