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2035

Uncle Gump

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In California by 2035... all new vehicle sales will be zero emissions vehicle. They say several other states plan to follow their lead.
 


Uncle Gump

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They have a bunch of work to do to make that a reality...
 

dvdswan

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I saw that. WA governor wants to follow suit. I don't see it happening in the next 15 years. I know companies are working on recycling the batteries from EVs which will be a huge profit for some company in the near future if they can 100% recycle the batteries so no part ends up in the landfill.

I won't happen in our lifetime, but all the jobs that are going to be lost from gas stations closing is not going to be balanced out by recycling batteries.
 

ericbphoto

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It's not practical. This is the most ridiculous "pie in the sky" dream so far. It's unbelievable how far out of touch with reality those people are.
 

85_Ranger4x4

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:icon_confused:


Another angle to speed things along...

 

RonD

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It will make our old Rangers worth a lot more :)
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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Give me a break... ICE vehicles arent going to be taken away. But I agree with going away from carbon fuels. The Earth has a limited supply...and eventually we will run out of oil and natural gas. Well, not really run out so much, as run out of easily accessible, relatively cheap carbon fuels. And without companies being forced by government to look for other fuels they never would until its too late.
 

Bill

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That's what they say, and it's easy to say. However, there are numerous problems to work out before that will happen, and it's not going to be the grid that's the problem. The problems that need to be solved are installing charging stations. A lot of people don't understand the current requirements. They think you can run an extension cord from the 20 amp 120 volt outlet in their garage to charge their car. Well, they can, but that's a very slow charge. If they have access to the standard 30 amp 240 volt outlet that is used by dryers, that's a fair improvement. However, they aren't going to have "fast" charging capabilities and they probable are going to be making choices between the laundry and charging the car. A fast charger can require a 100 amp or greater circuit which will have to be installed, and in most cases, wiring run from the back of the house to the front. There's a good chance an additional breaker box will have to be installed alongside the metered box. This isn't going to be too much of a problem for newer homes, but there are older homes where service hasn't been upgraded and still have 30 -60 amp service. This will involve the utility. An upgraded drop is the responsibility of the utility in California (up to 200 amps, I think), but the cost of a new breaker box is the responsibility of the owner. I can't image what the cost will be in some parts of the country.

Then there's the issue with large apartment complexes where tenants park in a large parking lot. Installing chargers for these tenants could involve digging up the parking lot.

Range is going to be a problem. Most of the inexpensive EVs have a Range of about 225 miles when the battery is new. That's fine for the people who do nothing but commute to an from work, but it means a trip from Sacramento to the Los Angeles area is going to require a stop about halfway to recharge the battery. The range will likely improve by 2035, but people driving long distances are still going to have a long stop to recharge the battery. The only workaround for this is battery exchange stations, but I foresee a problem with proprietary battery connectors or proprietary something else if a standard isn't mandated for all vehicles.

And then there is the issue with the things I do, like taking off into the middle of nowhere for a week. Somehow I don't think there's going to be charging stations anywhere near these places in the near future, or 2035. The only workaround for this is hybrid vehicles.
 

85_Ranger4x4

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Give me a break... ICE vehicles arent going to be taken away. But I agree with going away from carbon fuels. The Earth has a limited supply...and eventually we will run out of oil and natural gas. Well, not really run out so much, as run out of easily accessible, relatively cheap carbon fuels. And without companies being forced by government to look for other fuels they never would until its too late.
Thats kinda the getcha... take away coal and natural gas and we doing have juice for electric cars either.

Solar and wind and hydro sound cool... can only do so much of that too though and they environmental impacts too.

Otherwise most other "fuels" are pretty much on the back burner. They can make gas from algae, manure, waste etc too if they wanted to.

IF WE ARE ALLOWED TO KEEP THEM :pissedoff:
Keeping them is a non issue.

Screwing with the oil industry to effect pricing to sideline them is another.

Because if you can't afford gas the only logical way for the average schmo to get to work is to go buy a new electric car and turn an electrician loose in his garage to wire up a charging station (or two)

If I had a ton of money with my VERY savvy business sense... I would put up a charging station in town. The way this stuff is getting crammed down our throats I think it could be a good thing to get on in. As an added plus I would have the only charging station within 30 miles of my town, and the next one is 30 miles farther yet.

Then the little voice in my head says that if it was such a good thing somebody else actually smart enough to have the money to do it would have already done it by now.
 

Bill

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Give me a break... ICE vehicles arent going to be taken away. But I agree with going away from carbon fuels. The Earth has a limited supply...and eventually we will run out of oil and natural gas. Well, not really run out so much, as run out of easily accessible, relatively cheap carbon fuels. And without companies being forced by government to look for other fuels they never would until its too late.
It isn't the supply that is the problem. It's the carbon that is the problem.
 

Bill

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1990RangerinSK

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That's what they say, and it's easy to say. However, there are numerous problems to work out before that will happen, and it's not going to be the grid that's the problem. The problems that need to be solved are installing charging stations. A lot of people don't understand the current requirements. They think you can run an extension cord from the 20 amp 120 volt outlet in their garage to charge their car. Well, they can, but that's a very slow charge. If they have access to the standard 30 amp 240 volt outlet that is used by dryers, that's a fair improvement. However, they aren't going to have "fast" charging capabilities and they probable are going to be making choices between the laundry and charging the car. A fast charger can require a 100 amp or greater circuit which will have to be installed, and in most cases, wiring run from the back of the house to the front. There's a good chance an additional breaker box will have to be installed alongside the metered box. This isn't going to be too much of a problem for newer homes, but there are older homes where service hasn't been upgraded and still have 30 -60 amp service. This will involve the utility. An upgraded drop is the responsibility of the utility in California (up to 200 amps, I think), but the cost of a new breaker box is the responsibility of the owner. I can't image what the cost will be in some parts of the country.

Then there's the issue with large apartment complexes where tenants park in a large parking lot. Installing chargers for these tenants could involve digging up the parking lot.

Range is going to be a problem. Most of the inexpensive EVs have a Range of about 225 miles when the battery is new. That's fine for the people who do nothing but commute to an from work, but it means a trip from Sacramento to the Los Angeles area is going to require a stop about halfway to recharge the battery. The range will likely improve by 2035, but people driving long distances are still going to have a long stop to recharge the battery. The only workaround for this is battery exchange stations, but I foresee a problem with proprietary battery connectors or proprietary something else if a standard isn't mandated for all vehicles.

And then there is the issue with the things I do, like taking off into the middle of nowhere for a week. Somehow I don't think there's going to be charging stations anywhere near these places in the near future, or 2035. The only workaround for this is hybrid vehicles.
It seems to me that range has increased quite a bit in the last five years. In the last ten, I think (don't quote me on this), in fact, that it's doubled. So, in another 15 years, with a current typical range of about 300 miles, in 15 years we might hit 750.

What I'd love to see manufacturers do is this: on a FWD car, the rear wheels are just along for the ride. Why not hook them up to a generator. Say, maybe, that the generator could generate 75%. So, for every mile you drive, you get .75 miles. At 300 miles range, that would increase range to at least 525 miles.
 

alwaysFlOoReD

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It seems to me that range has increased quite a bit in the last five years. In the last ten, I think (don't quote me on this), in fact, that it's doubled. So, in another 15 years, with a current typical range of about 300 miles, in 15 years we might hit 750.

What I'd love to see manufacturers do is this: on a FWD car, the rear wheels are just along for the ride. Why not hook them up to a generator. Say, maybe, that the generator could generate 75%. So, for every mile you drive, you get .75 miles. At 300 miles range, that would increase range to at least 525 miles.
I dont thinkit works like that. There is no free energy. The front would have to work harder to pull the back if the back is generating energy. Using the braking system to generate energy is possible and being done.
 

1990RangerinSK

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I dont thinkit works like that. There is no free energy. The front would have to work harder to pull the back if the back is generating energy. Using the braking system to generate energy is possible and being done.
Hmm. Didn't I account for that, in the fact that you generate 75% of what you use? You wouldn't get infinite range. If you have a generation rate of .75, a 300 mile range battery ends up with a range of 1200 miles.
 

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