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2.8 fuel bleeding

Sean's84

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2.8l
Transmission
Automatic
My 84 work beast has been giving me issues, so a few weeks back I finally drained the old cruddy ancient fuel out if it and pulled the original tank out. I had originally just wanted to replace the fuel gauge sender (which predictably was corroded to almost nothing) but after seeing the interior of the tank full of rust I bought a new steel tank and replaced the whole thing.

I only had part of the day to work on it so did not get to bleeding the air from the fuel line. I was also tired of laying on tarp covered gravel.

This will be my first time doing this fuel bleed to the old boy so figured I would check here for any advice before I go back to the project this weekend. I did replace the fuel filter the same day as the tank. I've got a couple manuals but they don't always give the right amount of detail...

thanks guys!
 


RonD

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Take fuel line from the gas tank off the engines fuel pump

Assuming there is gasoline in the tank, lol.
The more the better

Get a damp towel/rag and a piece of garden hose

Put end of hose in gas tank's filler(gas cap opening), wrap damp towel around it to make a seal.
Blow into the hose
Your lungs can generate about 2psi pressure, this is enough to start a siphon over the top of the tank and down to the filter and then to the fuel pump.

Don't use an air compressor for this, you can blow off fittings with too much pressure

If any of the fuel line is rubber hose then you can lightly squeeze it with visegrips to stop the flow while putting the fuel line back on the fuel pump, you won't lose the siphon


The mechanical fuel pump can't pump air, so its very hard for it to start the siphon over the top of the tank.

You can use the above method with fuel pump connected, and it could work, it would work for sure if you did it while someone cranked the engine.


Another method is to remove fuel line at the carb, use a funnel and try to get fuel to run down the line, to Prime the pump.
Then add some fuel to carb
Try to start engine, if it gets enough run time it can start the siphon
 

Sean's84

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Bronco II
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2.8l
Transmission
Automatic
Perfect, thanks for those suggestion RonD!

I now have a course of action for my next repair on this thing. Will try to remember to post up my results.
 

LoneRanger3O2

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Thanks for the suggestions....gonna need this info as i plan on changing fuel filter, lines, and possibly to an electric pump on my 84....as well as rebuild the carb. Definitely gonna need this.
 

Sean's84

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Bronco II
Engine Size
2.8l
Transmission
Automatic
the old boy lives again!

I began with a bit of fuel in the carb, and the truck would try to start, then die once the fuel was used up. At least I knew it wanted to run...
I disconnected the fuel line at the filter and it was dry.

So I used my handy GenTap fuel siphon (the same one I got to drain all the old fuel from the original tank before I removed it) and was able to use the larger siphon line in the kit to press fit onto the steel fuel line. I then reversed the siphon so that I was pushing fuel into the line from a jerry can until the line was full to the pump. Reconnected the line to the filter and carb and tried to start it. I had to do this twice, but it allowed the engine to run long enough for the pump to pull some new fuel into the line and Vrooom! it fired up and settled into a nice idle. :yahoo:

It was like the sound of victory!

And it is a great feeling knowing that I've got a shiny new tank without dents or rust under the big skidplate now.

next up will be finishing off the fuel system with a carb rebuild and a new fuel pump so it will pass smog in CA. Then brakes and power steering overhauls......but for now I am just so happy to be able to move the truck around and have it be a useful tool again instead of a boat anchor.

thanks RangerStation!
 

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