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2.8 Forged Pistons

Dsetz

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PetroleumJunkie412

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My credo
Give 'yer balls a tug. Fight me.
...which means they'll fit the 2.9?

Any sign of forged rods yet?
 

Dsetz

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The 2.9 bore is 3mm larger.
Looks like the 2.9 and 3.0 share bore specs.

It APPEARS rods between 2.8 and 2.9 are the same. I haven't looked for them or found them. Its probably a bad sign that the Euro engine companies harden stock rods.
Although the Euro cologne folk claim the rod bolts are the limiting factor to ~250 hp.
 

Dsetz

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Nope bad info, 2.8 is 3.66" and 2.9 is 3.7" which are 1 mm different. Not sure what the specs on those linked pistons are but they claim they are custom made. Might be able to accou t for the difference or get an overbore set.
Burton appears to charge 2x as much for 94mm pistons.

There are rods available for $600+ it appears. But then you'd need a forged crank!
Maybe consider just hardening crank and rods? Has to be waaaay cheaper.
 

Dsetz

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Dsetz

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Last edited:

bigro 007

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Nope bad info, 2.8 is 3.66" and 2.9 is 3.7" which are 1 mm different. Not sure what the specs on those linked pistons are but they claim they are custom made. Might be able to accou t for the difference or get an overbore set.
Burton appears to charge 2x as much for 94mm pistons.

There are rods available for $600+ it appears. But then you'd need a forged crank!
Maybe consider just hardening crank and rods? Has to be waaaay cheaper.
bolth engine share the same bore please get the fact straigh for people who are not aware with these engine
 

franklin2

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I am a little new to the cologne engine family. But I have driven a stock 1986 2.9 with a 5 speed for about 8 years, and engine had loads of power. I often wondered why someone would want to swap in a v8, it ran that good.

Now I am running a 1984 2.8. Same trans, I actually swapped it in. It has the same gearing also. It's pretty sick. I see all this stuff to hop up the 2.8, but I keep asking myself why would I do that? Why would I not start out with the 2.9 which ran so good stock, and hop it up? How much money would you have to spend on a 2.8 to get to run like a stock 2.9? I like the 2.8 because it has a carb and is tuneable somewhat. That's the one thing I did not like about the 2.9 was the fuel injection system. When it ran good it ran good. When it didn't, it was a nightmare to troubleshoot.
 

PetroleumJunkie412

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My credo
Give 'yer balls a tug. Fight me.
I am a little new to the cologne engine family. But I have driven a stock 1986 2.9 with a 5 speed for about 8 years, and engine had loads of power. I often wondered why someone would want to swap in a v8, it ran that good.

Now I am running a 1984 2.8. Same trans, I actually swapped it in. It has the same gearing also. It's pretty sick. I see all this stuff to hop up the 2.8, but I keep asking myself why would I do that? Why would I not start out with the 2.9 which ran so good stock, and hop it up? How much money would you have to spend on a 2.8 to get to run like a stock 2.9? I like the 2.8 because it has a carb and is tuneable somewhat. That's the one thing I did not like about the 2.9 was the fuel injection system. When it ran good it ran good. When it didn't, it was a nightmare to troubleshoot.
Your eec iv was a good efi computer in its day. By now, it's capacitors are on its last legs, and the binaries that it is written in are effective, but difficult to modify.

Carburetors are last century and a TERRIBLE way to govern an engine. The best carbs on earth do not hold a candle to 'good' efi.

Learn to tune efi. It's not hard. You have experts here that are willing to help.

If this nerd can do it, anyone can.



 

franklin2

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I was reading your write up on your truck hoping to run across your megasquirt info thanks for posting it above. I have been debating that route for awhile, insterested in reading how you did it. The EECIV is very difficult to troubleshoot sometimes and unless you have a breakout box, no streaming data from any of the sensors. Of course with the breakout box you are reading voltages directly from the sensors.
 

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