1994 2.3 rwd with 265 75r15


mhmitszach

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Long time reader, had my ranger for almost a year now.

1993 2.3 rwd with 3.43 axle stock tire size is 195 70 r 14.

14s suck and tires are a pain to find.

So I got the 1994 4x4s for $200 with 265 75 r 15 already mounted. Would definitely get smaller tires if I ever wear through these. I drive less than 5k a year.

Running them now...

Just curious how crazy my gear ratio is? I'm super new to working on vehicles and everything about gear ratios is greek to me.

Could anyone explain my setup to me and your thoughts?

Thanks so much!

Zach

EDIT: It is a 1993. Ignore my title! Sorry.
 
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Here is a nice calcultor: http://www.therangerstation.com/tech_library/Gear_Tire_RatioChange.shtml

Basically the gear ratios, as we use them area short hand form. So what you really have is probably 3.45 gears, or 3.45 to 1. So the drive shaft will spin a little less than 3 1/2 times to each full rotation of the axle shaft (and consequently the wheel). The higher the number the lower the gearing (a little counter-intuitive, but it is what it is). The higher the gearing (low number) the harder it is for the engine to get things rolling. Think of it like a lever. A long lever makes things easy to move, and short one makes it harder. A bigger number is a longer lever. But you can get it too long and then you spend all day moving your lever to barely move your load.


So your current setup is the same as having the stock tires with a 2.78 ratio. To return to the factory performance you would want 4.10 or 4.11 gears. To pick up a little performance you could go to 4.56.

Here is a chart where you pick your tire size and gear ratio find the intersection and it will show you how they will interact.

http://www.therangerstation.com/how-to_pages/gear_ratio_tire_size_chart.shtml
 

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Just curious - where are you located? I have a 4.10 axle ready to pull from my '99 that might work for you.
 

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Awesome that actually makes sense.

So based on that chart, I should actually get good highway mileage and I'm still in "range" so my setup isn't entirely garbage.

I'm in Seattle, WA...

I saw a 4.10 rear axle for $100 on craigslist recently.

Is upgrading the 7,8 to a 8,8 4.10 as simple as removing and reinstalling a new axle?

I mean, there isn't any sort of adapter or new drive shaft needed is there?

Thanks so much for the info!
 

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Where you fall in the range you need to ask yourself what kind of driving you are going to do. If you are doing mostly highway cruising then you are ok. If you do mostly city, or a nearly even mix, you should change the gears.

7.5 to 8.8 on your year is mostly bolt-in. You might have to do something with the brake lines as the 7.5 and 8.8 have different fittings at the wheel cylinders. It should be as simple as a pair of line adapter fittings though.
 

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https://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/pts/d/ford-88-axle-410-limited-slip/6486185447.html

Seems like a good price. Looking on car-part it looks like most junkyards want about $300.

I don't know if I really need to do this but it sure is fun trying to setup a short box 4 banger with all the better stock parts! So far just got the 15 inch wheels.

I've already replaced the 2.3. New radiator, thermostat, water pump, battery, starter, clutch,flywheel, front shocks and front wheel bearings.
 

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4.10 would be a good ratio for tires sized between 215/75R15 - 235/75R15 with your 2.3L. If you eventually plan to get tires within that size, I agree, get the 4.10 axle and just toss it under there.

If you intend to stay with 265/75R15 (nearly same as 31x10.50R15), then you may want to think about a swap to 4.56 gears.

Nice looking truck, BTW. :icon_thumby:
 

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Well just been looking around on car part to get an idea on price... Looks like if I want one, they're easily available for $275-350.

However... seems like a few options come up for $100-200 if I keep my eyes open.


$190
2002 Rear Axle Assembly Mazda Pickup Not Rotary B2500
MAZDA B-3000 8.8 RING GEAR, 9 BRAKES (4X2), 4.10 RATIO
151,987 A $WW955

Any reason a mazda rear axle wouldn't work? This seems a good amount cheaper.
 

4x4junkie

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No differences I'm aware of between '94-'09 Mazda B-series axles and Ranger axles.
 

mhmitszach

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No differences I'm aware of between '94-'09 Mazda B-series axles and Ranger axles.
Mine is a 93.

Is it worth getting a 7.5 4.10 for under $200?

Most 8.8s at junkyards look to be at least $300.

What other benefits would upgrading to the 8.8 offer me other than better gearing?
 
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4x4junkie

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94-'09 B-Series axles are exactly same as '93-'09 Ranger axles.

1994 is the year Mazda began rebadging Rangers as their B-series (a '93 or earlier B-series OTOH is an entirely different truck actually built by Mazda themselves).


With a 2.3L in front of it, an 8.8" isn't really going to offer you much over a 7.5". Ratios from 3.08-4.56 are widely available for both axles (4.56 being aftermarket stuff). The 8.8" does allow you a couple more steps down to 5.13:1 (also aftermarket), along with more locker options, but you'd need to be running 35" tires to utilize 5.13s effectively.
 
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mhmitszach

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94-'09 B-Series axles are exactly same as '93-'09 Ranger axles.

1994 is the year Mazda began rebadging Rangers as their B-series (a '93 or earlier B-series OTOH is an entirely different truck actually built by Mazda themselves).


With a 2.3L in front of it, an 8.8" isn't really going to offer you much over a 7.5". Ratios from 3.08-4.56 are widely available for both axles (4.56 being aftermarket stuff). The 8.8" does allow you a couple more steps down to 5.13:1 (also aftermarket), along with more locker options, but you'd need to be running 35" tires to utilize 5.13s effectively.
That's cool, there are so many options for parts! The swap to a 7.5 inch 4.10 geared rear end would be the budget move to maximize the swap to 15 inch rims. It really comes down to what is the best price/distance on car-part.

I wish I had realized that swapping to 15s was going to affect the mpg and gearing so much... But thats why I bought this truck, to learn.

NOTE for all future readers/ tire swap size 14 to 15 inch

Stock 2.3 with 3.45 gearing is a dog when you run 265/75r15. Better get going fast up a hill if you hope to make it in 3rd. Seattle city traffic is all 1st and 2nd. I've got the gas half throttle just to maintain 3rd. Guessing I went from 20 mpg to below 15 mpg.

Driver tire side rubs on the inner plastic wheel well when turned / cut all the way. I would rather be running a size smaller. Although, I think it looks pretty cool with the big ass tires.
 

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Found a 7.5 inch 4.10 gear rear axle with 4x4 leaf spring blocks and ubolts for $75 on craigslist.

Gonna lift the front end with welded washer coil spacers to match the back end lift.

Does anyone know if the stock shocks will work with coil spacers in the front? I just replaced them with napa mid level brand so Im trying to be cheap and keep them but I'm thinking I probably need to match the back which are going to be 4x4...

Any suggestions on a rear shocks/shocks in general?

This is a daily driver I'm trying to get setup "clean". This is basically it when it comes to modifying the truck. I considered not lifting and just switching to 225 tires to keep it truly stock but just not likely to have come from the factory on an xl shortbody trim. But thats boring lol so Im just gonna do the most simple lift that is easy to remove and gives me more clearance for the bigger tires. Everything else here on out is cleaning it up and restoring.

Stock parts
2.3l 5spd shortbox 93
7.5 inch 4.10 gear
265/75r15 (biggest stock size)
4x4 stock rear leaf blocks/ubolts

modified
coil spacer front end lift
 
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4x4junkie

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Your front shocks will likely work with a spacer lift, but not very well. You'll probably have an inch or two of downtravel at most in the suspension, which will cause the suspension to top out and jerk the truck back down with a clunk after you've gone over a speed hump or other dip in the road.

A temporary stop-gap measure that can help is to space the shocks downward some at the top stud. I've seen stud extender kits available for this, though anything up to one inch you probably can do just by sticking some washers or another nut underneath the shock bushing. Only caveat is you'll need to use a locknut & Loctite to keep the nut in place afterward, as you will no longer be able to crank the nut all the way down 'till it stops without crushing the bushings (a closed-end (cap) nut might work also, you could then tighten it until it contacts the end of the shock stud, which would keep it in place the same).
 


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