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1993 Ford Ranger XLT 3.0 V6 RWD rear right brake overheating


MarcusDeMaaijer

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Sep 28, 2014
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Age
54
Location
Curacao
Vehicle Year
1993
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Size
3.0
Transmission
Automatic
1993 Ford Ranger XLT 3.0 V6 RWD rear right brake was leaking so badly that I had to refill one bottle each time I drove. After replacement of brake cylinder the leak stopped, but after driving I noticed right away an awful smell and then discovered that the brake was touching and causing overheating of the metal parts and the center part of the wheel.

Also the brake has a spongy feel to it and when depressed it makes a gushy sound as if air is escaping

The mechanic says I need to replace the booster.

My question to you all is if you think that replacing the booster will reduce break locking and prevent rear right brake overheating?

I know everything about wild animal rescue but very little about my Ford Ranger so I could really use some advice since I live on a small island near South America and good mechanics down here are scarce.
 


Rock Auto 5% Discount Code: F9A1A579ACFAD1: October 1st, 2021

wizkid00104

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Oct 15, 2007
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Location
West Newton/Penn Hills, PA
Vehicle Year
1994/2002
Make / Model
Ford
Engine Size
2.3L/5.4L
Transmission
Manual
I've had this problem with mine several times. The emergency brake cables on these trucks like to sieze up. I replaced every brake part before realizing that was the problem. The cables sieze, then you put new shoes on, then the heat up and wear quickly.

If you are doing this yourself, here are a few things to keep in mind:
1. Do yourself a favor and replace both rear cables (left and right)
2. If the shoes are worn weird, replace them. They are pretty cheap for these trucks.
3. If you replace the shoes, replace the hardware (springs and retainers). They are also very cheap.
4. If there is a big lip inside the drum brakes, find a location that cuts brake rotors and drums and have them resurfaced. Or just replace them.
5. Take the self adjuster screws apart, grease the end cap, and put anti-seize on the threads. This will make sure the brake adjusts and works reliably.
6.Use your e brake. Using the brake helps prevents the cables from seizing as easily. Feel free to grease the cables where the go into the sheathing and do this from time to time if you live in the northern states that have rock salt.

Hope this helps.
 


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