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1991 Ranger no start


rusty ol ranger

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Its a 4wd so its either a 2.9 or 4.0.

If it is a 2.9 and you need to swap ignition modules buy the 5 dollar ignition module tool, its a real headache saver.
 


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andremajic

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Good stuff. I'm not sure if you own an inline spark tester, but for about 6 bucks it's really convenient to have in your tool box to see if spark is getting to the plug. I just pull my plugs at the coils and look for the spark, but there's more of a chance of getting shocked by doing it that way.

Andy
 

Mokume

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Have you found the problem(s) yet?
There's another area you need to consider as well, compression, in addition to spark and fuel.
Check each required condition before moving on to the next, makes no difference if the engine is in a different "platform".
Internal combustion, gas fueled engines need all 3 conditions to start and run...including your lawnmower, chainsaw, weed eater, outboard motor etc.
The V6 in your '91 is no different.
 

Mokume

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Good stuff. I'm not sure if you own an inline spark tester, but for about 6 bucks it's really convenient to have in your tool box to see if spark is getting to the plug. I just pull my plugs at the coils and look for the spark, but there's more of a chance of getting shocked by doing it that way.

Andy
Would you believe I once met a human spark analyzer once?
Sometime in the mid seventies a buddy of mine and I were trying to figure out why a slant-six in an ancient Valiant had a dead miss. We did a cyl. balance test by pulling s/plug wires one at a time and found the offending cylinder. The car was probably the "deluxe" model because it had the "toilet seat" trunk lid...
Along comes my buddies neighbor, an old time retired mechanic, with the engine running he pulls off the dead cylinders plug wire and sticks his finger in the end!
We watched in amazement (and horror) as the muscles in his arm spasmed, he replaced the wire to the plug and moved on to the next 5 cylinders, repeating the process.
When he was done, he proclaimed that spark was not the problem, all 6 "felt" the same.
Turns out it had a burnt valve...
 

esrbtwo1

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I did get the truck running. I apologize for not posting sooner. It was actually a little bizarre. First thing I did was just give everything a good once over visually to make sure nothing was obviously wrong, such as a rats nest in the engine bay. I put a new battery in it, and sprayed some ether into the intake. It immediately fired up and ran for a couple seconds, so I was pretty sure it was fuel related. I turned the key to try and hear the fuel pump, which I did not. However my hearing isn't the greatest so not hearing it didn't necessarily mean anything. So I recruited my nephew as my helper. The fuel pump was not coming on. I managed to trace it to the relay which was dead as a door nail. I pulled the old one out and noticed it was a little corroded but not terribly so. So I cleaned it up and still nothing. I put in the new relay I brought with me and still got nothing. After fiddling with it for a while I came to the conclusion I got a bad relay out of the box. I took out the new relay put the old one back in and was going to run to the parts store to exchange it for another. As I was getting ready to go my grandfather walked out and asked how it was coming, and my nephew decided to show him the truck wouldn't start. Turned the key and it fired right up. No idea why that relay decided to start working again. But it did, and it made it the 3 and half hour trip home with no issue. I couldn't be happier with this truck and how simple it turned out to be to get going. I went ahead and got another relay I am keeping in the glove box since I don't know if it's going to start acting up again. Thank you again everyone for all the help. I am still amazed at all the people who chimed in on this issue.
 
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alwaysFlOoReD

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Thanks for posting the fix.
 

esrbtwo1

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Would you believe I once met a human spark analyzer once?
Sometime in the mid seventies a buddy of mine and I were trying to figure out why a slant-six in an ancient Valiant had a dead miss. We did a cyl. balance test by pulling s/plug wires one at a time and found the offending cylinder. The car was probably the "deluxe" model because it had the "toilet seat" trunk lid...
Along comes my buddies neighbor, an old time retired mechanic, with the engine running he pulls off the dead cylinders plug wire and sticks his finger in the end!
We watched in amazement (and horror) as the muscles in his arm spasmed, he replaced the wire to the plug and moved on to the next 5 cylinders, repeating the process.
When he was done, he proclaimed that spark was not the problem, all 6 "felt" the same.
Turns out it had a burnt valve...

Actually while I was working on the truck, I went ahead and changed the spark plugs on this one, since the ones in it were original to the truck and I already had new ones with me. As I was doing this my grandfather was telling me about how in his youth, in the days of the Model A he said it was common place among him and the guys to grab a hold of a spark plug as a test of manliness to see who could hold on the longest lol.
 
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Mokume

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I did get the truck running. I apologize for not posting sooner. It was actually a little bizarre. First thing I did was just give everything a good once over visually to make sure nothing was obviously wrong, such as a rats nest in the engine bay. I put a new battery in it, and sprayed some ether into the intake. It immediately fired up and ran for a couple seconds, so I was pretty sure it was fuel related. I turned the key to try and hear the fuel pump, which I did not. However my hearing isn't the greatest so not hearing it didn't necessarily mean anything. So I recruited my nephew as my helper. The fuel pump was not coming on. I managed to trace it to the relay which was dead as a door nail. I pulled the old one out and noticed it was a little corroded but not terribly so. So I cleaned it up and still nothing. I put in the new relay I brought with me and still got nothing. After fiddling with it for a while I came to the conclusion I got a bad relay out of the box. I took out the new relay put the old one back in and was going to run to the parts store to exchange it for another. As I was getting ready to go my grandfather walked out and asked how it was coming, and my nephew decided to show him the truck wouldn't start. Turned the key and it fired right up. No idea why that relay decided to start working again. But it did, and it made it the 3 and half hour trip home with no issue. I couldn't be happier with this truck and how simple it turned out to be to get going. I went ahead and got another relay I am keeping in the glove box since I don't know if it's going to start acting up again. Thank you again everyone for all the help. I am still amazed at all the people who chimed in on this issue.
Glad you found it bud, post pics of it when you can.
Would you believe there is a certain species? of ants here in Hawaii which has an affinity for the sealing compound used for relays? Evidently these critters find Ford and Chrysler relays particularly appealing...
 

Josh B

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I did get the truck running. I apologize for not posting sooner. It was actually a little bizarre. First thing I did was just give everything a good once over visually to make sure nothing was obviously wrong, such as a rats nest in the engine bay. I put a new battery in it, and sprayed some ether into the intake. It immediately fired up and ran for a couple seconds, so I was pretty sure it was fuel related. I turned the key to try and hear the fuel pump, which I did not. However my hearing isn't the greatest so not hearing it didn't necessarily mean anything. So I recruited my nephew as my helper. The fuel pump was not coming on. I managed to trace it to the relay which was dead as a door nail. I pulled the old one out and noticed it was a little corroded but not terribly so. So I cleaned it up and still nothing. I put in the new relay I brought with me and still got nothing. After fiddling with it for a while I came to the conclusion I got a bad relay out of the box. I took out the new relay put the old one back in and was going to run to the parts store to exchange it for another. As I was getting ready to go my grandfather walked out and asked how it was coming, and my nephew decided to show him the truck wouldn't start. Turned the key and it fired right up. No idea why that relay decided to start working again. But it did, and it made it the 3 and half hour trip home with no issue. I couldn't be happier with this truck and how simple it turned out to be to get going. I went ahead and got another relay I am keeping in the glove box since I don't know if it's going to start acting up again. Thank you again everyone for all the help. I am still amazed at all the people who chimed in on this issue.
I think possibly the relay ground or connectors had lost contact somewhere at some time over the years it set up, and merely the fact of you pulling the connectors and anchors and putting them back regained the connection it needed
 

Josh B

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These are most of the parts that will keep your truck from running
Nice post man, it actually deserves its own thread.
One especially I wonder, what is that L shape one to the right of , and below of, the throttle body and alternator?
 
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Mokume

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Nice post man, it actually deserves its own thread.
One especially I wonder, what is that L shape one to the right of , and below of, the throttle body and alternator?
Looks to be the PCV valve and hose.
 

RobbieD

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I'm glad to hear that you got your "new" truck home. Would love to see pics of it.
 

Josh B

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91stranger

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When you saw corrosion on the pump relay that means the other half is probably corroded too. Sometimes it never hurts to get a knife or small screwdriver and clean up the base of the relay panel to get some good shiny metal so you KNOW it is making a good connection. A little common sense goes a long way with older vehicles. Wouldn't hurt to do a good cleaning on all the connectors if it's been sitting a while.
 


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