Recent content by J_J_DePre


  1. Ranger for Short Commutes and Weekend Errands

    I would only consider a 4×4 Ranger with the manual-transfer case and manual-locking hubs along with a manual transmission and XL trim with manual locks and windows. I have also resided in Pennsylvania for all of my life, and I have considerable experience driving RWD vehicles in the snow...
  2. Ranger for Short Commutes and Weekend Errands

    All three of the examples have clean tire wells, cab corners, and rocker panels; all would and have passed inspection as well. The 2.3 and 4.0 are especially immaculate, and the 3.0 is very clean as well aside from a dent in the passenger-side fender and a small crack in the grille, which is...
  3. Ranger for Short Commutes and Weekend Errands

    I am looking to purchase a Ranger and have chosen not to pursue a Duratec because of the extensive use of plastics in the engine compartment that are more susceptible to warping and degradation from heat and pressure, and I have also noted the inherent difficulty of replacing the valves on the...
  4. 1996 2.3 I4, 4×4 Ranger

    Ron, this particular example has a five-speed, manual transmission to which you alluded, a manual-transfer case (floor lever), manual-locking hubs (front wheels), manual-window cranks, a bench seat, and XL trim; it is a rather basic, albeit inexpensive and very fuel-efficient truck. Moreover...
  5. 1996 2.3 I4, 4×4 Ranger

    I just purchased a 1996 Ford Ranger XL Regular Cab with a 2.3 I4 mated to a 5-speed, manual transmission and a 4×4 with a manual-transfer case and manual-locking hubs. I know they are exceptionally rare, as I was only able to locate four examples in a search query factoring a 500-mile radius. I...
  6. 1996 2.3 I4 4×4

    I just purchased a 1996 Ford Ranger XL Regular Cab with a 2.3 I4 mated to a 5-speed, manual transmission and a 4×4 with a manual-transfer case and manual-locking hubs. I know they are exceptionally rare, as I was only able to locate four examples in a search query factoring a 500-mile radius. I...
  7. Which Ranger should I buy?

    Rusty: I have a 2003 F-250 Super Duty (6.8 V10, ZF6 Manual, 4x4, XL Super Cab) as my work truck and primary/daily vehicle; whereas my colleague just purchased a 2018 Silverado 1500 (5.3 V8, Auto, 4x4) with the cylinder-deactivation and auto-start/stop features. I drove his truck to a job site...
  8. Which Ranger should I buy?

    I purchased the 1990 Ranger (2.9 V6, 5-speed, 4x4) as a secondary vehicle for local errands and a 1993 F-350 (7.5 V8, 5-speed, 4x4) as a tertiary vehicle principally for plowing my and my father's driveway.
  9. Which Ranger should I buy?

    Rusty, the power numbers are thus: 1990 Ford Ranger Regular Cab (2.9 V6): 140 Horsepower, 170 ft/lbs Torque 1996 Ford Ranger Regular Cab (2.3 I4): 112 Horsepower, 135 ft/lbs Torque
  10. Which Ranger should I buy?

    Uncle Gump:
  11. Which Ranger should I buy?

    Uncle Gump: He employed hood pins because the hood became misaligned after the accident, and it would not catch the latch to close properly.
  12. Which Ranger should I buy?

    Uncle Gump: The owner of the 1996 Ranger said during the winter he struck a tree at approximately 35 miles per hour, causing damage to the bumper, grill, and left-frame horn; the bumper and grill were not yet replaced, and he said he used a porta-power to reset the left-frame horn.
  13. Which Ranger should I buy?

    Saddle Tramp: *No one has, thus far, commented upon the rarity of the 2.3 I4, 4x4 Ranger whose production ceased after the 1997-model year. **I have a 2003 Ford F-250 Super Duty (Super Cab) with a 6.8 Triton V10 mated to a ZF6-manual transmission and 4x4-drivetrain with a manual-transfer case...
  14. Which Ranger should I buy?

    1996 Ford Ranger Regular Cab 2.3 I4 5-Speed, Standard/Manual Transmission 4x4 with Manual-Locking Hubs and Manual-Transfer Case 231,836 Miles $600 Needs Heater Core and Serpentine Belt 1990 Ford Ranger Regular Cab 2.9 V6 5-Speed, Standard/Manual Transmission 4x4 with Manual-Locking Hubs and...


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