Amp draw


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I have a 2004 Ranger manual speed transmission that I want to add a hydrogen generator to. When I did this to my Buick my generator drew too many amps and I was blowing out my alternators and destroying batteries. How do I find out how many amps my truck is drawing before I put the generator in so I know whether or not I need to put a bigger alternator in it?
 


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Dirtman

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If you have to put a bigger alternator in to run the generator doesn't it cancel out the insignificant benefit of the hydrogen generator? :icon_confused:
 

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The generator is a hydrogen generator. It helps improve fuel mileage and adds a bit of get up and go (when installed and working properly).
 

ericbphoto

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He understood that. The point is that if you have to increase the size of your alternator that much to run the hydrogen generator, that requires more horsepower from the engine to spin the bigger alternator for the increased electrical load. Is the hydrogen generator going to save enough fuel/money to overcome that?

I did some quick research just now since I had never heard of this. One engineer reported that the hydrogen generator itself (if sized sufficiently to generate a significant amount of hydrogen) would require about 850 amps. At 12 volts, that converts to about 13.67 horsepower just to run the hydrogen generator.

I realize that I didn't do a thorough job of researching it. But if you are serious, I encourage you to be thorough in your research before spending a lot of money on it. I'd hate to see you waste a bunch of time and money and possibly mess up a vehicle.
 


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